Posts Tagged ‘world’s’

Alien Isolation, Amazon Fire TV, Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, Rambo – GameSlean Weekly

In the news Alien: Isolation gets a release date, Amazon Fire TV comes out of nowhere, and Phil Spencer gets promoted to head of Xbox. Later in our reviews w…

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SONY XEL-1 – the world’s first OLED (organic light-emitting diode) TV

SONY XEL-1 – the world’s first OLED (organic light-emitting diode) TV Sony Japan: http://www.sony.jp/oel/products/XEL-1/ Sony United Kingdom: http://www.sony…

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Freescale makes the world’s smallest ARM controller chip even tinier

Apparently, Freescale didn’t think the diminutive Kinetis KL02 was tiny enough — it just unveiled the KL03, the new world’s smallest ARM microcontroller. At 1.6mm by 2mm, the Cortex-M0+ chip is 15 percent smaller than its ancestor. That’s miniscule…

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The World’s First Carbon Fiber 3D Printer Is Now Available To Order

carbonfiber

Just in case you have $ 4,999 lying around and have a hankering to print in carbon fiber, the Mark One 3D printer is now available for pre-order. When first announced last month, the Mark One was going to be available to order in March, but today is your lucky day.

Named aptly for its creator, Gregory Mark, who also owns Aeromotions, this desktop printer debuted at SolidWorks World 2014 in San Diego. After seeing the expense and time currently associated with carbon fiber manufacturing, Mark started down a path that eventually ended up at the Mark One.

“We took the idea of 3D printing, that process of laying things down strand by strand, and we used it as a manufacturing process to make composite parts,” he told Popular Mechanics. “We say it’s like regular 3D printers do the form — we do form and function.”

The printer can not only lay down carbon fiber, but also fiberglass, nylon and PLA. Of course, only one at a time. The printer employees some pretty nifty advancements, too, including a self-leveling printing bed that clicks into position before each print.

For a few dollars more, the company also offers a Mark One Developer Kit Pre-order that puts your order at the front of the line and includes a few extras, including more Kevlar and two extra beds.

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The World’s First Carbon Fiber 3D Printer Is Now Available To Order

carbonfiber

Just in case you have $ 4,999 lying around and have a hankering to print in carbon fiber, the Mark One 3D printer is now available for pre-order. When first announced last month, the Mark One was going to be available to order in March, but today is your lucky day.

Named aptly for its creator, Gregory Mark, who also owns Aeromotions, this desktop printer debuted at SolidWorks World 2014 in San Diego. After seeing the expense and time currently associated with carbon fiber manufacturing, Mark started down a path that eventually ended up at the Mark One.

“We took the idea of 3D printing, that process of laying things down strand by strand, and we used it as a manufacturing process to make composite parts,” he told Popular Mechanics. “We say it’s like regular 3D printers do the form — we do form and function.”

The printer can not only lay down carbon fiber, but also fiberglass, nylon and PLA. Of course, only one at a time. The printer employees some pretty nifty advancements, too, including a self-leveling printing bed that clicks into position before each print.

For a few dollars more, the company also offers a Mark One Developer Kit Pre-order that puts your order at the front of the line and includes a few extras, including more Kevlar and two extra beds.

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Watch how Criterion restores the world’s best movies

Only the best movies get rereleases from Criterion, but it often takes a lot of polishing, editing, and preservation to bring older selections into the beautiful condition that viewers expect. To see a bit of that restoration process, Gizmodo dropped by the Criterion offices in New York as it was beginning work on Alfred Hitchcock’s Foreign Correspondent. In a video, Criterion staff describe how they take a film from negatives to a digital print. In this case, its staff had everything they needed to produce a good release: “When you can get the original negative and it’s in good condition, you’re in great shape,” Lee Kline, a technical director for Criterion, tells Gizmodo.

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World’s most precise atomic clock will still be spot-on in 5 billion years

Most of us only pay attention to time when it’s causing headaches, but the same can’t be said of a team of researchers working out of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Led by National Institute of Standards and Technology fellow Jun Ye, they’ve …

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Meet Urb-E, The World’s Most Compact Electric Scooter

One of the more interesting discoveries at this year’s CES was the Urb-E e-vehicle, a super compact electric scooter that folds right up in a jiffy.

We interviewed co-founder Grant Delgatti and learned that the little guy is meant for commuters who need a little extra push for the last leg of their journey, whether it be the mile from the train station to the house or from the cheap parking lot down the street to the office.

The Urb-E can go twenty miles on a single charge, and has a max speed of 15 mph. I rode one around for a bit after the interview and while it takes some getting used to, it’s a whole lot of fun once you get the hang of it.

Even better, the Urb-E folds up to be about the size of a small suitcase, and can be rolled around like one, too.

In the final version, Urb-E will have a dock for you to charge your smartphone, as well as an app that can plug into the scooter and give back information on how much battery is left.

Delgatti hasn’t made final decisions on price point, but that will be announced soon when the company launches its Kickstarter campaign. He estimates it will go for about $ 1,500.

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Google Is Proud New Owner of World’s Fastest Robot

Google has confirmed its acquisition of Boston Dynamics, the maker of the world’s fastest-running robot. The acquisition marks Google’s eighth takeover of a …

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Gorgeous glass sculptures let you see into the world’s most deadly viruses

Viruses are usually depicted as ugly, scary, almost weapon-like blobs just waiting to meddle inside of your body, but Luke Jerram sees them as something different. There isn’t really a color to viruses after all — they’re smaller than the wavelength of visible light — and as mere smears when viewed under a microscope, there’s plenty of room left open when deciding how to illustrate them.

Since 2004, Jerram has been turning viruses and other pathogens into stunning glass sculptures that are just as eerie as they are beautiful as part of an ongoing series titled “Glass Microbiology.” He chooses some of the most feared and deadly subjects out there too, making chilling portraits of everything from HIV to malaria.

Of course, creating…

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