Google Docs version tracking makes collaboration easier

Since adopting the G Suite moniker in September, Google has been steadily beefing up Docs, Sheets, and Slides. Whereas, in the past its updates have targeted select sets of users (like one-tap citations for researchers) its latest crop of tools are all-encompassing. And, they’re all about tracking changes on collaborative docs — even from mobile devices.

Google seems to be fond of rebrands, because starting today “revision history” is dubbed “version history.” This is the place where you can track your team’s changes. The new title also brings with it the ability to assign custom names to versions of a doc, sheet, or slide. That way you can keep on top of things by maintaining a historical record of your squad’s progress. It can also be used to indicate that a doc is actually final (as in completed).

If you’re someone that likes to review documents on the go, Google has you covered. Now, you can suggest edits to a doc from an iPhone or Android handset, and an iPad. Just click the three dots menu at the bottom right of your screen, turn on the “suggest changes” toggle, and input your thoughts in the new “suggestion mode.”

Docs is also receiving a couple of quick-action prompts, including a new preview option that scrubs out comments and suggested edits to show a clean version of your draft. Or, you can skip the review stage altogether by instantly accepting or rejecting all changes. Both options can be accessed via the tools drop-down menu.

Rounding out the updates are a bunch of new templates and add-ons for businesses. And, G Suite is also integrating Google Cloud Search (which uses machine learning to find relevant info from across Google’s productivity apps) for business and enterprise customers.

Source: Google Blog

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Latest version of iOS solves iPhone 6’s shutdown issues

Some iPhone 6 and 6s devices have been randomly shutting down over the past several months. iOS 10.2.1 was designed to fix the issue, and Apple says it has successfully solved the problem for most people who’ve already installed it. Cupertino told TechCrunch that 10.2.1, which has already been downloaded by roughly half of all iOS users, has led to an 80 percent reduction of unexpected shutdowns in iPhone 6s and 70 percent reduction in iPhone 6. TC says the affected phones unexpectedly shut down due to sudden spikes of activity in older iOS versions that cause older batteries to malfunction.

A spokesperson told the publication:

“With iOS 10.2.1, Apple made improvements to reduce occurrences of unexpected shutdowns that a small number of users were experiencing with their iPhone. iOS 10.2.1 already has over 50% of active iOS devices upgraded and the diagnostic data we’ve received from upgraders shows that for this small percentage of users experiencing the issue, we’re seeing a more than 80% reduction in iPhone 6s and over 70% reduction on iPhone 6 of devices unexpectedly shutting down.”

Apple also told TechCrunch that it has given the older iPhones the ability to restart without needing to be plugged in. Before the fix came out, people had no choice but to plug in their phones whenever an unexpected shutdown happens. In addition, the tech titan will roll out another feature in the next few days. If the latest version of iOS deems your battery to be too old and worn down, you’ll see a notice in settings telling you that “your battery needs service.”

Apple didn’t give an advice on what to do if version 10.2.1 doesn’t fix the problem for you. But if you’ve been experiencing the same issue, try installing the platform update first before getting your battery replaced.

Source: TechCrunch

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