Posts Tagged ‘Ubuntu’

Canonical gives developers a preview of a dual-booting Ubuntu and Android future

Choice, friends, is good. Nobody likes being limited to one thing, when instead you could be picking from a plethora, or at least a pair of options. And it looks like Ubuntu is on track to deliver on its promise to deliver a duo of operating systems …

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Ubuntu desktop and mobile icons redesigned, united at last

Canonical’s been working for years to turn Ubuntu into a universal OS for whatever sized screen you use, be it of the television, desktop or mobile variety. Recently, the company showed off the next step in this evolution: unified icon designs for mobile and desktop Ubuntu implementations. In keeping with current UI trends, the new icons have flatter, more stylized appearance when compared to the old desktop iconography. System tiles are less colorful and more reserved in appearance, while apps and folders have been punched up with a flashier look to set them apart visually. Of course, the new icons won’t actually make their way into a Ubuntu for awhile, as the goal is to get them into the 14.04 release for mobile (13.10 is the current version). Should you want more background on the production of the new icons, there’s an hour-long video discussing it after the break. Don’t forget the popcorn.

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Source: OMG! Ubuntu!

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Ubuntu desktop and mobile icons redesigned, united at last

Canonical’s been working for years to turn Ubuntu into a universal OS for whatever sized screen you use, be it of the television, desktop or mobile variety. Recently, the company showed off the next step in this evolution: unified icon designs for mobile and desktop Ubuntu implementations. In keeping with current UI trends, the new icons have flatter, more stylized appearance when compared to the old desktop iconography. System tiles are less colorful and more reserved in appearance, while apps and folders have been punched up with a flashier look to set them apart visually. Of course, the new icons won’t actually make their way into a Ubuntu for awhile, as the goal is to get them into the 14.04 release for mobile (13.10 is the current version). Should you want more background on the production of the new icons, there’s an hour-long video discussing it after the break. Don’t forget the popcorn.

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Source: OMG! Ubuntu!

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Ubuntu desktop and mobile icons redesigned, united at last

Canonical’s been working for years to turn Ubuntu into a universal OS for whatever sized screen you use, be it of the television, desktop or mobile variety. Recently, the company showed off the next step in this evolution: unified icon designs for mobile and desktop Ubuntu implementations. In keeping with current UI trends, the new icons have flatter, more stylized appearance when compared to the old desktop iconography. System tiles are less colorful and more reserved in appearance, while apps and folders have been punched up with a flashier look to set them apart visually. Of course, the new icons won’t actually make their way into a Ubuntu for awhile, as the goal is to get them into the 14.04 release for mobile (13.10 is the current version). Should you want more background on the production of the new icons, there’s an hour-long video discussing it after the break. Don’t forget the popcorn.

Filed under: ,

Comments

Source: OMG! Ubuntu!

Related Posts:

Ubuntu desktop and mobile icons redesigned, united at last

Canonical’s been working for years to turn Ubuntu into a universal OS for whatever sized screen you use, be it of the television, desktop or mobile variety. Recently, the company showed off the next step in this evolution: unified icon designs for mobile and desktop Ubuntu implementations. In keeping with current UI trends, the new icons have flatter, more stylized appearance when compared to the old desktop iconography. System tiles are less colorful and more reserved in appearance, while apps and folders have been punched up with a flashier look to set them apart visually. Of course, the new icons won’t actually make their way into a Ubuntu for awhile, as the goal is to get them into the 14.04 release for mobile (13.10 is the current version). Should you want more background on the production of the new icons, there’s an hour-long video discussing it after the break. Don’t forget the popcorn.

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Source: OMG! Ubuntu!

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This Week On The TechCrunch Gadgets Podcast: Ubuntu, Omate, Digitizer And A Gold iPhone?

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The Ubuntu Edge may have been the most successful crowdfunding campaign in history, but that doesn’t mean it made its goal. Meanwhile, yet another smartwatch joined the fray this week, coaxing John’s money out of his wallet by being just a tad “smarter” than the rest. Makerbot released a scanner this week called the Digitizer, which lets you scan objects to then print them, but we’re not sure we’re down with the high price tag. And last, but certainly not least, we all pretty much agree that a gold iPhone will make its way into the world come September 10.

We discuss all this and more on the latest episode of the TC Gadgets podcast, featuring John Biggs, Matt Burns, Jordan Crook, Darrell Etherington, Natasha Lomas and Romain Dillet.

Enjoy!

We invite you to enjoy our weekly podcasts every Friday at 3pm Eastern and noon Pacific.

Click here to download an MP3 of this show.
You can subscribe to the show via RSS.
Subscribe in iTunes

Intro Music by Rick Barr.

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Ubuntu Edge Smartphone Fails To Hit Ambitious $32M Crowdfunding Target

Ubuntu Edge Indiegogo

Trying to raise $ 32 million via crowdfunding always looked overly ambitious. And indeed it has proved to be so. Canonical’s Ubuntu Edge Indiegogo campaign to build a smartphone designed for converged computing has fallen considerably short of its target, ending with the fixed funding project receiving nothing at all — which, when you’ve got pledges worth around $ 12 million, has got to hurt. The campaign ran from July 22 to August 21.

The Edge, which promised to be both a high end Android and/or Ubuntu-powered smartphone and also an Ubuntu-powered desktop replacement, never looked like it would climb its own crowdfunding Everest, as Canonical was forced to keep coming up with new tricks to try to eke out more backers. The price of the device was lowered, dropping from $ 830 to $ 695, plus additional price tiers were added. It even offered backers the ability to vote on the next model’s specs if the project hit its target. Which sounds like a nice carrot — but not a $ 32 million carrot.

The largest sum raised via crowdfunding to date remains the $ 10.2 million garned by the Pebble smartwatch (via Kickstarter) — a project which had a far more modest $ 100,000 goal. If Canonical had plumped for a more modest funding target it too could be taking home multiple millions of dollars right now. Albeit, the cost of building a high end smartphone is of course hugely higher than building a smartphone accessory like Pebble — as Canonical noted:

We’ve set such a high crowdfunding target for a good reason. Between design, certification and manufacture, the costs of building a new phone are huge — but the more we produce, the lower the final cost of each handset. Setting such an ambitious target means a more competitive price per device.

It’s all about scale. To offer the final product at a competitive price we need to produce enough volume to bring the unit costs down. At the same time, we want to be selecting parts that are not yet proven for multi-million-unit production. This is the balance we found. A lower funding target might seem more likely to succeed, but the individual perk amounts would have to be significantly higher. We believe this funding target and these perk levels give us the best chance of success.

In the event Canonical raised just over a third of their overly ambitious funding target, and generated plenty of publicity trying. Which may ultimately have been mostly what the campaign was about. We’ve reached out to the company to ask what their plans are post-Indiegogo unfunding and will update this story with any response. Their project page also notes: “If we don’t reach our target then we will focus only on commercially available handsets and there will not be an Ubuntu Edge. All contributions will be fully refunded.”

The Edge received around 27,500 publicly listed backers, including Bloomberg which pledged $ 80,000 for 100 Edge devices — the sole backer at the top tier enterprise pledge level.

The project raises some interesting questions about the limits of crowdfunding for funding complex hardware projects. Many more modest hardware projects do very well on crowdfunding platforms but there is clearly a funding sweet spot considerably far south of the multi-millions Canonical was hoping to raise (suggesting Elon Musk probably shouldn’t bother trying to crowdfund a $ 6 billion Hyperloop). At the Edge funding level, investor/VC backing appears to be the only game in town.

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Ubuntu Edge raises record-breaking $10 million, enters Guinness Book of Almost

Ubuntu Edge

$ 10,311,220. It isn’t sufficient to greenlight Canonical’s innovative hybrid smartphone, but it is just enough to beat the sum raised by the Pebble smartwatch and thereby steal the crowdfunding record. Well, sort of, at least. It depends on whether the amount pledged is all that matters, regardless of whether the project actually comes to fruition — as happened with both the Pebble on Kickstarter and Indiegogo’s previous record holder, the Scanadu Scout. More importantly though, Ubuntu Edge may have reached the point where it’ll have a second chance even if it doesn’t achieve the required backing of $ 32 million: Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth told the BBC that some manufacturers have noticed the all the hubbub and have come “out of the woodwork” to discuss taking the Android / Ubuntu concept forward, such that August 21st may not prove to be a terminal deadline.

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This Week On The TC Gadgets Podcast: Ubuntu Edge, Nexus Rumors, Beddit And Trace Tracker

ubuntupodcast

The Ubuntu Edge may be the future of the smartphone, but does it have a future? Nexus rumors abound for the next generation of Google’s vanilla tablets and smartphones. Meanwhile, startups are hitting up Indiegogo with new quantified self devices, including sleep-tracking sheet Beddit and extreme sports tracker Trace.

We discuss all this and more on this week’s episode of the TechCrunch Gadgets Podcast, featuring John Biggs, Jordan Crook, Darrell Etherington and Romain Dillet.

We also invite you to check out our new DroidCast which airs every Wednesday.

Enjoy!

We invite you to enjoy our weekly podcasts every Friday at 3pm Eastern and noon Pacific.

Click here to download an MP3 of this show.
You can subscribe to the show via RSS.
Subscribe in iTunes

Intro Music by Rick Barr.

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Ubuntu Edge Gets Its First Major Corporate Backer In Bloomberg, But Funding Still Off Needed Pace

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The Ubuntu Edge is an audacious attempt to crowdsource the next smartphone advancement. Canonical, the company behind the Edge and Ubuntu itself is seeking an exorbitant $ 32 million to make it happen, and gave itself only a month to raise those funds. Now, Bloomberg LP has come forward as its first major corporate backer, with a lump $ 80,000 contribution in exchange for 100 Ubuntu Edge devices and enterprise workshops and technical support.

Bloomberg is the first backer at the “Enterprise 100″ campaign backer level, and that’s good news for the Ubuntu Edge, and would smash the initial targets of most hardware crowdfunding campaigns out there on its own, but the Ubuntu Edge isn’t just another crowdfunding campaign. That $ 32 million goal is looking mighty distant, having added only $ 1 million or thereabouts in the past week of its campaign, as noted by The Verge. A single $ 80,000 injection definitely helps things, but it doesn’t put the project on pace to reach $ 32 million by the end of the month, even if Bloomberg or other corporate backers were to plug $ 80,000 into the project daily on top of the current pace.

In fact, even being generous and projecting that Canonical manages to nab an even $ 10 million by this evening (unlikely), that gives it two weeks to raise an additional $ 24 million, which works out to $ 1.7 million per day. That’s a lot, and given that it earned $ 1 million in the past week altogether, not a very realistic expectation.

Bloomberg says in a statement that it’s excited about Canonical’s vision of converged computing with the Edge in particular. ”Ubuntu’s goal to offer a single-device solution for enterprise convergence and mobility is an exciting prospect and one that complements our vision for open development on the mobile platform,” says Bloomberg LP’s Head of Web Architecture Justin Erenkrantz in an official release detailing the news, noting that cross-platform, seamless performance is a chief goal of Bloomberg’s in terms of what it provides for its clients.

Canonical better have some considerable Hail Mary plays up its sleeve if it hopes to make that goal, and LastPass Premium bundled subscriptions and Bloomberg support, nice as they both are, just aren’t going to cut it. We’ll have to see if Canonical’s ambitious vision in this case ends up being an utter daydream, or if there’s some kind of buzzer-beating offensive play left in place to get funding back on track.

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