Posts Tagged ‘theremin’

Theremin Simulation Using Kinect Sensor

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Light Hum: a pure analog theremin that converts rays into electro-grooves (video)

Light Hum a pure analog 'theramin' instrument that converts light into electrogrooves

Who doesn’t love a good theremin spectacle? We Engadgeteers are aficionados of the touchless, variable capacitor musical instrument used in countless ’50s space films, so a project by student and designer Danne Woo definitely caught our eye. Woo, who appeared on one of our most popular Engadget shows ever, has built a light-sensing version of that instrument controlled by an AC sequencer. No computers are used in the all-analog device, which is played by moving sliders and dials that vary the intensity of eight lamps installed in front of the musician. The light is converted to varying-frequency sound via photocells, resistors and capacitors which feed a “kleebtronics sequencer” designed by Mark Kleback and Ezer Lichtenstein. To show what it could do, Danne performed a short concert at Glasslands in Brooklyn, bringing the “Good Vibrations” instrument to a whole ‘nother place — catch it in the video after the break.

Continue reading Light Hum: a pure analog theremin that converts rays into electro-grooves (video)

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Source: Danne Woo Blog (1), (2)

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Light Hum: a pure analog theremin that converts rays into electro-grooves (video)

Light Hum a pure analog 'theramin' instrument that converts light into electrogrooves

Who doesn’t love a good theremin spectacle? We Engadgeteers are aficionados of the touchless, variable capacitor musical instrument used in countless ’50s space films, so a project by student and designer Danne Woo definitely caught our eye. Woo, who appeared on one of our most popular Engadget shows ever, has built a light-sensing version of that instrument controlled by an AC sequencer. No computers are used in the all-analog device, which is played by moving sliders and dials that vary the intensity of eight lamps installed in front of the musician. The light is converted to varying-frequency sound via photocells, resistors and capacitors which feed a “kleebtronics sequencer” designed by Mark Kleback and Ezer Lichtenstein. To show what it could do, Danne performed a short concert at Glasslands in Brooklyn, bringing the “Good Vibrations” instrument to a whole ‘nother place — catch it in the video after the break.

Continue reading Light Hum: a pure analog theremin that converts rays into electro-grooves (video)

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Source: Danne Woo Blog (1), (2)

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23-foot-high theremin appears in Melbourne, begins to freak out passersby

It appeared out of nowhere. And it makes semi-disturbing, 50s era sci-fi movie sounds when you
approach it. Over in Melbourne, artist Robin Fox has installed a seven meter (23 foot) high theremin instrument. Like the classic theremin design, the user doesn’t have to physically touch it but just has to be within a certain range to activate it. Once initiated, you can expect to be aurally bombarded with retro movie sounds — a cacophony of rubber monsters beating each other within an inch of their lives. The theremin will be present on the waterfront for the next three months as part of Melbourne Music Week, and you can click on through to hear its sounds as well as wonder when the ghost of Vincent Price will be showing up in the near future.

Continue reading 23-foot-high theremin appears in Melbourne, begins to freak out passersby

23-foot-high theremin appears in Melbourne, begins to freak out passersby originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 25 Nov 2011 01:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink iO9  |  sourceABC Melbourne  | Email this | Comments

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DIY Mini IR Theremin: Weee-ooo-ooo!

This DIY Theremin project uses infrared sensors and visible light to create what amounts to clever little audio projector. The closer your hand is to the light source the higher the tone and with a little practice you, too, can create the jarring, objectionable sound of the theremin in your own home or jail cell.

The full specs and ingredients are below, so get cracking. It requires some breadboarding and an understanding of microcontrollers, but you can probably handle it.

Project Page



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Kinect theremin is just too late for the ‘Day the Earth Stood Still’ remake soundtrack (video)

Kinect theremin is here, too late for the awful 'Day the Earth Stood Still' remake soundtrack (video)

The sound of the original theremin frightened audiences of spooky and science fictiony movies in the ’50s and ’60s, and while this digital replication is perhaps a little less chilling it’s also a lot less physical. It’s the so-called Therenect from Martin Kaltenbrunner, created using the Open Frameworks and OpenKinect libraries. To play just hold your hands up, allow the software to detect them, and then let the digital falsetto flow, as Martin kindly demonstrates for you below.

Continue reading Kinect theremin is just too late for the ‘Day the Earth Stood Still’ remake soundtrack (video)

Kinect theremin is just too late for the ‘Day the Earth Stood Still’ remake soundtrack (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Dec 2010 01:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Create Digital Music  |  sourceTherenect (vimeo)  | Email this | Comments
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