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Posts Tagged ‘that’s’

Xperia Z3 is coming to T-Mobile, but that’s just the beginning of Sony’s US adventure

Exactly a month ago, in the maelstrom of news coming out of IFA in Berlin, T-Mobile quietly disclosed what might have been expected by many: it’ll offer Sony’s next flagship smartphone, the Xperia Z3, in the US later this fall. T-Mobile has been the only major American carrier to embrace Sony’s Xperia family in recent times, however that relationship is now intensifying and should be followed by others soon as well. Whereas earlier Sony flagship handsets would take many months to reach the US market after their European debut, the timeline for the Z3 on T-Mobile suggests it is pretty much imminent. Moreover, when queried about the Xperia Z3 Compact — the handset I judged to be that little bit better than the Z3 — T-Mobile slyly asks its…

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That’s not a celebrity you’re following on Twitter, it’s an assistant

Adam Levine tweeted from an iPhone mere days after promoting Samsung’s Galaxy Note 4. Except, he probably didn’t. While we laugh at the hypocrisy of Levine selling one phone and using another, we miss the larger hypocrisy: that the person running @adamlevine probably isn’t Adam Levine, but his iPhone-using assistant.

In the past couple years, some celebrities have parlayed their fame and social media accounts into micro-media companies. Their handles are self-contained streams of self-promotion, brand management, and empty aphorisms. Like most media companies, they’re designed to court advertisers and business partners. They’re designed to make money.

Of course, the actual celebrities are too rich, too busy, or too indifferent to…

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That’s Too Many: Dog Has Surgery To Remove The 43.5 Socks He Ate

sock-eating-dog.jpg At least it wasn’t underwear. These are the results from a 3-year old Great Dane’s stomach surgery after his owner’s noticed he appeared sick. The vet removed an astonishing 43.5 socks. How the f*** the dog’s owners didn’t notice they were completely out of socks is beyond me.

The 3-year-old Great Dane was miserable and retching when its owners rushed him to a northwest Portland emergency animal hospital. X-rays showed a stomach full of “a large quantity of foreign material.” Nearly two hours of surgery later, Dr. Ashley Magee had the answer — the dog had consumed 43 ½ socks. DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital spokeswoman Shawna Harch said it’s perhaps the strangest case in the hospital’s history, The Oregonian reported.

I dunno, maybe you should start feeding him dog food instead of socks. I mean, I’m no dog whisperer, but I’m pretty sure that’s what you’re supposed to do. Besides, eating socks? That doesn’t sound like a very smart dog. When reached for comment, my dog informed me she would never bang another dog so stupid. Although she seems totally fine with the dog down the street that’s always eating dead worms off the sidewalk, so she worries me. Thanks to Cheryl, who informed me her dog tore the wire out of one of her bras once.

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Meet The Robot That’s Trying To Seduce Women On OkCupid

Girls Who Date Computers is one disillusioned New Yorker’s quest to expose the banality of online dating. Does it go too far?

girlswhodatecomputers.tumblr.com

When Schuyler Hunt moved from Boston to New York for a job four months ago, he did what a lot of young Big Apple transplants do: He signed up for OkCupid. The 28-year-old quickly found online dating in New York to be entirely different from his experiences in Boston and Richmond, Va.

“I'd never seen anything like it,” Hunt said. “As a nerdy guy, I was not used to getting inundated with requests. Everyone I talked to said that it's hard to find a guy here, and that the female market is really saturated.”

Instead of being overjoyed, Hunt was overwhelmed and slightly discouraged. It seemed to him that the women messaging him weren't so much interested in him as in not being alone. He wasn't even sure if they were paying attention to his written responses.

“I was thinking: They don't care,” said Hunt. “They just want somebody.”

Hunt had recently seen the Spike Jonze film Her, about a lonely single man in the near future who falls in love with a dulcet-voiced operating system, and he started to form an idea. Could he create a bot, of sorts, that could convincingly do the work of a man on OkCupid? And what would that say about the state of online dating in New York?

In early July, Hunt, who works as a creative technologist at the ad firm Translation, started his project. Using photographs of a friend to start the profile, Hunt wrote “bland, average answers” and responded to the site's hundreds of yes-no question prompts randomly. The idea was to create a profile that was intentionally vague, one that didn't give potential matches much of a clue to his personality. In fact, the only signs of life on the profile were cheeky references to an interest in artificial intelligence and robotics.

Messages started pouring in to the fake man's mailbox. Hunt took each one and submitted it to Cleverbot, the artificial intelligence-powered web chatbot that has passed the Turing test, the famous human-fooling standard for AI articulated by the British computer scientist Alan Turing. Hunt fed Chatbot's responses back into OkCupid, and kept the conversations going on as long as possible.

girlswhodatecomputers.tumblr.com

The results were startling — at times hilarious, at times poignant — and Hunt, who had been uploading them to a private Tumblr, told his bosses, including Steve Stoute, the record executive. They encouraged Hunt not just to keep going, but to make his project public.

Hunt collected the conversations at Girls Who Date Computers, which he describes on the site as “A fake OkCupid profile … created to see if anyone could ever talk to and fall in love with www.cleverbot.com.” The conversations tend to follow a few scripts. In one, Cleverbot produces an enticingly enigmatic answer to a generic greeting (Girl: “How's it going?” Cleverbot: “Good. I'm almost finished.”) and Hunt's interlocutor plays along for awhile, sometimes for a dozen or more messages. In another, Cleverbot produces an incredibly off-putting response (Woman: “Drinks are great for me. Ever around Union Square on a weekday after 6pm, we should meet up.” Cleverbot: “Can you not be boring?”) and the conversation ends abruptly. In every case, the conversations eventually hit a point at which Cleverbot's coy uncanniness ends the exchange.

Girls Who Date Computers arrives just as the debate over user experimentation, on OkCupid specifically and on social networks in general, swells. Last month, after users and web privacy advocates excoriated Facebook for showing different people different News Feed content as part of a broader experiment on emotional states, OkCupid's co-founder Christian Rudder forcefully defended the role of experimentation on users as a necessary practice in the evolution of websites in general, including his own.


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Meet The Robot That’s Trying To Seduce Women On OkCupid

Girls Who Date Computers is one disillusioned New Yorker’s quest to expose the banality of online dating. Does it go too far?

girlswhodatecomputers.tumblr.com

When Schuyler Hunt moved from Boston to New York for a job four months ago, he did what a lot of young Big Apple transplants do: He signed up for OkCupid. The 28-year-old quickly found online dating in New York to be entirely different from his experiences in Boston and Richmond, Va.

“I'd never seen anything like it,” Hunt said. “As a nerdy guy, I was not used to getting inundated with requests. Everyone I talked to said that it's hard to find a guy here, and that the female market is really saturated.”

Instead of being overjoyed, Hunt was overwhelmed and slightly discouraged. It seemed to him that the women messaging him weren't so much interested in him as in not being alone. He wasn't even sure if they were paying attention to his written responses.

“I was thinking: They don't care,” said Hunt. “They just want somebody.”

Hunt had recently seen the Spike Jonze film Her, about a lonely single man in the near future who falls in love with a dulcet-voiced operating system, and he started to form an idea. Could he create a bot, of sorts, that could convincingly do the work of a man on OkCupid? And what would that say about the state of online dating in New York?

In early July, Hunt, who works as a creative technologist at the Jay Z-funded ad firm Translation, started his project. Using photographs of a friend to start the profile, Hunt wrote “bland, average answers” and responded to the site's hundreds of yes-no question prompts randomly. The idea was to create a profile that was intentionally vague, one that didn't give potential matches much of a clue to his personality. In fact, the only signs of life on the profile were cheeky references to an interest in artificial intelligence and robotics.

Messages started pouring in to the fake man's mailbox. Hunt took each one and submitted it to Cleverbot, the artificial intelligence-powered web chatbot that has passed the Turing test, the famous human-fooling standard for AI articulated by the British computer scientist Alan Turing. Hunt fed Chatbot's responses back into OkCupid, and kept the conversations going on as long as possible.

girlswhodatecomputers.tumblr.com

The results were startling — at times hilarious, at times poignant — and Hunt, who had been uploading them to a private Tumblr, told his bosses, including Steve Stoute, the record executive. They encouraged Hunt not just to keep going, but to make his project public.

Hunt collected the conversations at Girls Who Date Computers, which he describes on the site as “A fake OkCupid profile … created to see if anyone could ever talk to and fall in love with www.cleverbot.com.” The conversations tend to follow a few scripts. In one, Cleverbot produces an enticingly enigmatic answer to a generic greeting (Girl: “How's it going?” Cleverbot: “Good. I'm almost finished.”) and Hunt's interlocutor plays along for awhile, sometimes for a dozen or more messages. In another, Cleverbot produces an incredibly off-putting response (Woman: “Drinks are great for me. Ever around Union Square on a weekday after 6pm, we should meet up.” Cleverbot: “Can you not be boring?”) and the conversation ends abruptly. In every case, the conversations eventually hit a point at which Cleverbot's coy uncanniness ends the exchange.

Girls Who Date Computers arrives just as the debate over user experimentation, on OkCupid specifically and on social networks in general, swells. Last month, after users and web privacy advocates excoriated Facebook for showing different people different News Feed content as part of a broader experiment on emotional states, OkCupid's co-founder Christian Rudder forcefully defended the role of experimentation on users as a necessary practice in the evolution of websites in general, including his own.


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That’s So Kirk | Robot Chicken | Adult Swim

The Prime Directive is a one-way ticket to Jerkville. Watch Full Episodes: http://asw.im/8c5OHS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/AdultSwimSubscribe About Robot Chick…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Wearables Attack! Huawei Announces A Fitness Band That’s Also A Bluetooth Headset

huawei-talkband-b1-mwc-2014

Your fitness band got into my bluetooth headset! No, your bluetooth headset got into my fitness band! Stop! You’re both right!

In what I suspect will be a minor blip in the interstitial wearable world, China’s Huawei has announced a Bluetooth sports band complete with pedometer and calorie counter called the TalkBand B1. Why is it called the TalkBand? You can remove the 1.4-inch flexible OLED-fronted lozenge of electronics on the top and stick it into your ear, making it a Bluetooth headset.

The B1 works like any standard fitness band and pairs via NFC. However, because it can also act as a headset you could feasibly go for a run and take a call simultaneously, a boon to cardio-aware machers on the go. I doubt we’ll ever see this thing stateside so you’ll simply have to savor the strange idea of something you sweat all over going directly into your earhole.

via Engadget

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Wearables Attack! Huawei Announces A Fitness Band That’s Also A Bluetooth Headset

huawei-talkband-b1-mwc-2014

Your fitness band got into my bluetooth headset! No, your bluetooth headset got into my fitness band! Stop! You’re both right!

In what I suspect will be a minor blip in the interstitial wearable world, China’s Huawei has announced a Bluetooth sports band complete with pedometer and calorie counter called the TalkBand B1. Why is it called the TalkBand? You can remove the 1.4-inch flexible OLED-fronted lozenge of electronics on the top and stick it into your ear, making it a Bluetooth headset.

The B1 works like any standard fitness band and pairs via NFC. However, because it can also act as a headset you could feasibly go for a run and take a call simultaneously, a boon to cardio-aware machers on the go. I doubt we’ll ever see this thing stateside so you’ll simply have to savor the strange idea of something you sweat all over going directly into your earhole.

via Engadget

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Wearables Attack! Huawei Announces A Fitness Band That’s Also A Bluetooth Headset

huawei-talkband-b1-mwc-2014

Your fitness band got into my bluetooth headset! No, your bluetooth headset got into my fitness band! Stop! You’re both right!

In what I suspect will be a minor blip in the interstitial wearable world, China’s Huawei has announced a Bluetooth sports band complete with pedometer and calorie counter called the TalkBand B1. Why is it called the TalkBand? You can remove the 1.4-inch flexible OLED-fronted lozenge of electronics on the top and stick it into your ear, making it a Bluetooth headset.

The B1 works like any standard fitness band and pairs via NFC. However, because it can also act as a headset you could feasibly go for a run and take a call simultaneously, a boon to cardio-aware machers on the go. I doubt we’ll ever see this thing stateside so you’ll simply have to savor the strange idea of something you sweat all over going directly into your earhole.

via Engadget

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LG Confirms Its G Pro 2 Flagship Phablet, Yet Another Phone That’s Mostly Screen

LG G Pro 2

Say hello to the G Pro 2, LG’s new flagship smartphone — leaked aplenty up to now but officially confirmed today by the mobile maker. The Android 4.4 KitKat powered 4G quad-core device packs a Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 2.26 GHz processor, 3GB of memory and a 13MP rear camera with an optical image stabilization feature to support better snapping.

It’s (yet) another high end smartphone that’s practically all screen, with LG inflating the size of the pane vs last year’s model — bumping it up from the 5.5 inches of the Optimus G Pro to a 5.9 inch full HD pane.

That screen is clasped on two sides by an extra slim bezel of just 3.3mm, with LG touting “an industry-leading screen-to-frame ratio of 77.2 percent”, showing how marginal form factor design parameters have become if makers are shouting about squeezing more screen onto the slab.

Definitions of how large a screen a smartphone must have to qualify for ‘phablet’ status vary — and are likely themselves moving goal posts as more and more smartphones get bigger — but according to Juniper Research at least 5.6 inches are required. By that definition LG has upgraded the G Pro from big smartphone to proper phablet with today’s sequel.

(The G Pro 2 is not close to the biggest phablet on the market. Sony, for instance, outted a 6.4 inch whopper last year — with its Xperia Z Ultra – a phone so big the company also makes a Bluetooth companion accessory for, y’know, actually making/receiving calls.)

Aside from its big screen — which does not feature a bend, as LG’s recent curvacious foray, the LG G Flex, does — the G Pro 2 sports the same rear key controls the company stuck on last year’s G2.  A key placement that’s either wildcard genius or the worst idea in smartphone design history, depending on your view. Just don’t press the phone down on a table and hope it stays powered on.

The most notable other addition to LG’s new flagship is an unlocking feature called Knock Code, that lets users devise their own sequence of touchscreen taps (aka a ‘knock pattern’) to unlock the device. Which is presumably another reason for LG to beef up the screen size — so users have enough space to get a-knockin’. (Another feature that makes use of the big pane is a dual-browser mode.)

LG says anything from two to eight taps can be used to form this knock pattern, on any portion of the screen. And it reckons the tech supports 86,367 ‘knock’ combinations.

With Apple adding its biometric TouchID system to its flagship iPhone 5s home key, so users can unlock their phone with their fingerprint, rival smartphone makers are clearly stretching themselves to come up with security differentiators of their own.

Elsewhere, the LG G Pro 2 lavishes care and attention on the camera and photo smarts of the device, with anti-shake functionality and larger and more sensitive sensors front and rear.

Other image capture features include 4K ultra HD video recording; an 120fps HD video recording feature that supports slow-motion editing; a ‘magic focus’ feature to select the depth of focus after a photo is taken — a la Lytro, presumably; improved flash for more natural shots/selfies; an up to 20 continuous shots burst mode; and a gallery collage feature for uploading multiple shots.

It’s not clear which markets outside LG’s stamping ground of South Korea the LG G Pro 2 will land in as yet, with LG saying global availability has not yet been determined. It will be showing off the handset at the Mobile World Congress tradeshow in Barcelona — where TC will be on hand to get hands on.

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LG_G_PRO_2_02 (1)

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