Israeli company claims Apple copied its dual-camera tech

Whatever you think of your dual-camera iPhone, there’s one company that’s less than thrilled. Israeli startup Corephotonics is suing Apple for allegedly infringing on patented technology with the cameras in the iPhone 7 Plus and 8 Plus (it’s likely none too pleased about the iPhone X, for that matter). Corephotonics says it pitched Apple about a potential alliance, only to be shot down and see Apple implement dual cameras on its own. The plaintiff company even claims that Apple boasted it could infringe on patents without fear. Apple’s negotiator said it would take “years and millions of dollars” before the iPhone maker would have to pay if it did infringe, according to Corephotonics’ version of events.

We’ve asked Apple for comment and will let you know if it can provide its take on the situation.

The case may be more complicated than it seems at first. Apple has its own dual camera patents, so it’s clearly been exploring the idea. Corephotonics may need to show that Apple couldn’t have developed the iPhone’s dual cameras independently. Also, it may have to demonstrate that negotiations played out as described. There have been more than a few lawsuits where plaintiffs swore they’d informed tech giants about patents — Corephotonics’ detailed account of this is uncommon, but the court will likely want more tangible proof.

The one certainty is that this isn’t a fly-by-night lawsuit. Corephotonics got into dual camera technology relatively early, and it has worked with big-name partners like Samsung Electro-Mechanics and OmniVision. Whatever the truth, Apple can’t brush this off.

Source: Reuters

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The Galaxy S8 iris scanner can be hacked with aging tech

Biometrics are becoming our next de facto security measure, and they’re supposed to be a vast improvement on easily-forgotten and hackable passwords. Yet a point-and-shoot camera, laser printer and contact lens is all it took for German hacking group Chaos Computer Club to crack the Samsung Galaxy S8’s iris scanner. “By far [the] most expensive part of the iris biometry hack was the purchase of the Galaxy S8,” the group wrote on its website.

They pulled it off by taking a photo of the target from about five meters away, and printing a close-up of the eye on a laser printer — made by Samsung, no less. A regular contact lens was placed on top of the print to replicate the curve of an eyeball. When the print was held up to the smartphone, the S8 unlocked.

“The security risk to the user from iris recognition is even bigger than with fingerprints as we expose our irises a lot,” said Dirk Engling, spokesperson for the group, which previously hacked the iPhone 5S fingerprint sensor using photos of a glass surface. “Under some circumstances, a high-resolution picture from the internet is sufficient to capture an iris.”

Biometric security is taking off, particularly with the rise of mobile payments. Mastercard has rolled out “selfie pay” in Europe, while Australia has introduced facial recognition to replace passports in airports, and Chinese ride-share company Didi helps passengers verify their driver’s identity using face scanning.

Sci-fi has told us that iris scans are so accurate you’d need to cut out someone’s eyes to fool them. But the disappointing reality so far is that stuff a hacker could rummage for on Craigslist is probably good enough.

Source: Chaos Computer Club

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The 12 best tech gifts for fashionistas

Buying clothes and other apparel as gifts is always something of a risky proposition — and that’s doubly true if the person you’re shopping for prides herself on having good taste. Indeed, you might want to skip clothing altogether and focus on services your intended can use to do what they do best: be fabulous.

You might consider a gift card to Stitch Fix, where your friend will get a box of five items personalized to their tastes, with an option to return whatever they don’t like. Alternatively, there’s the Glam app for on-demand blowouts, manicures and makeup appointments, while Decorist offers online interior design consultations. If you’d still prefer to buy a physical gift, might we suggest headphones that look like a necklace, this sturdy-yet-stylish iPhone case or a fitness tracker that could pass for jewelry.

For our full list of recommendations in all categories, don’t forget to stop by our main Holiday Gift Guide hub.

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India wants the tech used to unlock the San Bernardino iPhone

Israeli forensics company Cellebrite helped the FBI access the contents of a suspect’s iPhone 5c following the shooting in San Bernardino last year. Now India is in talks to buy the company’s tech that will allow it to unlock phones and other devices. The Economic Times reports that India’s Forensic Science Laboratory (FSL) is purchasing the tool and should have it in hand within a month. What’s more, the FSL says India will be “a global hub for cases where law enforcement is unable to break into phones.” In other words, the India government will lend a hand to other countries that need to crack encrypted devices.

The Economic Times reports that the Indian government has already enlisted help from Cellebrite in “a few cases,” but now it will have the encryption cracking tech on hand to use as needed. Details are scarce on if the country will be the exclusive owner of the technology or under what circumstances it will make the resource available to other governments around the world. It’s also not a done deal yet, but FSL officials seem confident the government will complete the purchase soon. There’s no word on how much the transaction will cost, but the FBI paid Cellebrite over $ 1 million for its services in the San Bernardino case.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: The Economic Times

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SoftBank: Japan’s most interesting tech company

Japan and technology are often mentioned in the same breath. Bullet trains, robots, only-in-Japan phones that’ll never leave the island, digital pop-idols and so on. Tech legends like Sony, Nintendo, Panasonic, Sharp, Nikon, Canon, Toyota and more were born here, but most have had mixed fortunes in recent decades. Some missed out on (or were too late to) the smartphone boom, or suffered from declining point-and-shoot-camera sales. Others simply faced stronger competition from Korean and Chinese companies. Smartphones, wearables and VR have generally come from elsewhere. Japan’s reputation for getting the newest technology first doesn’t ring very true these days — in fact, those aforementioned tech giants have a reputation for being a risk-averse and slow to change. (Many, if not most companies still request that I fax over my RSVP for their press conferences and meetings. I kid you not.) Then there’s Softbank.

Softbank is now best known as one of Japan’s top three phone carriers, but at a time when Japan’s big tech firms are shrinking (or pairing off), it’s launched a humanoid robot, teamed up with Honda to make smarter cars and just bought out the company that designs the chips for most smartphones — including the iPhone.

But first, there’s Pepper. Years after Sony’s Aibo robot faded into obscurity and Honda’s Asimo walked, waved — and not much else — the idea of a personable home robot was replaced with faceless automated vacuum cleaners. Then SoftBank, with no history of robots, announced a large humanoid robot that would come to its phone shops — and even homes.

Early adopters and companies alike seemed to love it. Despite Pepper costing more than a high-end laptop, the first waves of the four-foot robot sold out in minutes. Japanese banks and companies like Nescafe and Pizza Hut all claimed one to help project their images of a futuristic company hiring android help. Pepper is far from perfect, but SoftBank managed to reinvigorate the robot dream in a country whose love for robots has never faltered — as well as inspiring a new generation of rivals. It’s an effort to restart the robot revolution. It’s still not the bot of our dreams, but it’s exciting, OK?

Last month SoftBank announced it’s buying ARM, the UK company responsible for the reference processor designs found in nearly all smartphones. Processors designed by the firm also power a lot of lightweight VR headsets, wearables and and myriad Internet of Things devices. It’s a powerful move for the company: Softbank is buying a major part of the tech supply chain, one that even Apple depends on for chip blueprints that it further develops.

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While Internet of Things is taking its time becoming a true revolution, SoftBank is well-placed to profit from it when it does. “ARM will be an excellent strategic fit within the SoftBank group as we invest to capture the very significant opportunities provided by the ‘Internet of Things,”‘ CEO Masayoshi Son said in a statement about the purchase. “This is one of the most important acquisitions we have ever made.”

In the same week as said “most important acquisition ever,” Son took to the stage with Honda’s CEO to announce a partnership aimed at developing cars that drivers can speak and interact with, channeling the same cloud-based processes found inside Pepper the robot. Details aren’t all that specific, but the companies say they’re looking into combining the technology so that cars could speak and interact with the driver, assess the driver’s emotions through vehicle sensors and cameras and offer support during long trips or while trying to park.

Perhaps even weirder: Honda and Softbank hope that by letting mobility products “grow up” while sharing various experiences with the owner, the user will form a stronger emotional attachment with the car. SoftBank talked a similar game before it launched Pepper, although we’re still waiting for a true reaction to our illogical human emotions.

Softbank isn’t new to Japan’s tech scene. Founded back in 1981, it’s changed and adapted what it sells and deals in. CEO Son started the company specializing as a software distributor and soon launched PC magazines at the start of the personal computing boom — a lucrative time to do so.

The company is also used to taking risks. After struggling for years to enter Japan’s carrier market, SoftBank acquired Vodafone Japan in 2006, and in 2008 it was the first (and only) phone operator in the country to offer the iPhone 3G — an exclusive it kept until 2011. Being the exclusive carrier for the iPhone sounds like common sense, but at the time it was surprisingly risky. Japan is the country of the “Galapagos” phones: flip-phones that had high-resolution cameras, TV tuners, GPS and music downloads for years before the iPhone arrived on the scene.

Apple’s (innovative but still new) PC-style Safari browser didn’t work with Japan’s already well-established mobile sites, and there weren’t even any emoji (gasp!). Phones with embedded NFC chips for contactless payments had already existed in Japan since 2004. To many Japanese phone users, it didn’t look quite as revolutionary as the rest of the world saw it.

History explained the rest: The iPhone was a huge success and helped SoftBank as a carrier gain a foothold in the Japan’s competitive phone market. Softbank’s long-running series of hugely popular TV ads ensure that everyone in Japan knows the company. The ads are weird, confident, funny — and now all the other native phone carriers are trying to copy the same magic for their own advertisements. Softbank-owned Sprint even tried to repurpose them in the US — even if it didn’t work out so well.

Softbank has so far struggled to turn around the American carrier, but it forms just one part of CEO Son’s bid to make Softbank a truly global organization. The company, primarily focused on Japan, also owns a substantial 28 percent share of China’s e-commerce giant Alibaba — it’s like Amazon, but way bigger. And of course, it now owns the UK-based ARM.

The gambles are paying off: SoftBank announced it increased profits 19 percent last quarter. And while the most recent moves may seem hugely disconnected, combining its moves into artificial intelligence (Pepper, autonomous cars) with ownership of ARM (and the chips it designs) Softbank could eventually be the company that truly makes internet of things a … thing.

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MasterCard is lending its mobile payment tech to banks

MasterCard is hoping to make in-store mobile payments — the ability to wave your phone at a terminal to buy something — more accessible. The company is teaming up with several banks, including Citi and Bank of America, to let customers pay for stuff using bank apps on their phones. Meaning, you won’t have to download a dedicated app.

This will be enabled through MasterCard’s Masterpass service, which is already available for in-app and online purchases, but now can be used in-stores. Consumers will be able to use it at over 5 million in-store locations in 77 countries. However, the feature will only be on Android phones that have built-in NFC chips. iPhone users will be left out because Apple doesn’t permit other companies to use its chip, which already powers a similar service in Apple Pay.

Tech giants like Google helped introduce the concept of mobile payments to the US a few years ago, and last year they accounted for $ 8.7 billion in sales. This will more than triple in 2016, according to leading media and commerce researcher eMarketer.

Mastercard believes that the ability to provide more information, like balances and rental car coverage, will give Masterpass a slight advantage over more established services like Android Pay. The company has also introduced a new logo to kickstart its shift towards mobile payments.

The rollout will start this month in the US, followed by Europe, Africa, and the Middle East later this year, and other areas in 2017.

Source: MasterCard

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