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Posts Tagged ‘tale’

CGI VFX Animated Short HD: “iDiots” – A tale by Big Lazy Robot VFX

CGI VFX Animated Short HD:

Watch this funny and creative CGI VFX animated short film by the talented team at Big Lazy Robot VFX BLR! For more detailed information please see the inform…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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Distro Issue 105: The tale of the amazing multi-colored e-paper display

Distro Issue 105 The tale of the amazing multicolored epaper display

Once upon a time, the possibility of a color e-reader seemed a reality just around the bend. As the sun set on the 2000s, though, prototypes and the potential for multi-hued e-paper devices seemed to disappear. In this issue of our weekly, Sean Buckley examines the events surrounding the once bright future of the tech and why we’re still e-reading in black-and-white. As far as reviews go, we offer up our detailed analysis of the TiVo Roamio Pro, OLPC XO Tablet and Motorola Droid Ultra. Eyes-On peeks at Blue Microphone’s latest, Weekly Stat examines the broadband build-up and Recommended Reading profiles Marissa Mayer. The weekend is finally here, and there’s plenty to peruse, so go on cozy up with a fresh copy via the usual download spots.

Distro Issue 105 PDF
Distro in the iTunes App Store
Distro in the Google Play Store

Distro in the Windows Store
Distro APK (for sideloading)
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Source: iTunes, Google Play, Windows Store

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A tale of two cities: destroying Sims’ lives in the pursuit of oil

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When architecture critic Justin Davidson began playing Sim City, he had long for a building an utopia. A lifetime of experience had given Davidson a concept of how to craft his dream city, but he quickly discovered Digital Arts’ city-building simulation was limiting. Not able to recreate a “chaotically useful” city like New York, he found himself paying attention to the game’s rules, marking out sets of industrial, commercial, and domestic areas, looking to fatten his budget plan and expand the populace. If a home does not work out? Knock it down and build another. Had to construct a new roadway? Bulldoze some homes and get it done.

Davidson soon found economic prosperity by partnering with his 15-year-old son, the owner of another virtual …

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Tale Of The Tape: Chromebook Pixel Vs. Surface Pro Vs. MacBook Air

cbp

Google hasn ’ t constantly been understood for making spectacular hardware, however today ’ s statement of the Chromebook Pixel — probably one of the best-looking notebooks ever made, if absolutely nothing else — means that could not be the case.

Still, you can ’ t be criticized for being cautious of shelling out a suitable portion of money on Google ’ s first venture into notebooks, not to mention a Chromebook of all things, so below ’ s an initial look at exactly how the Chromebook Pixel bundles up against 2 popular rivals in the computing area: the stock version of Apple ’ s 13-inch MacBook Air and Microsoft ’ s Surface Pro.

\* Note that we compared the base MBA and the surface Pro with upgraded storage space, to establish a better baseline in regards to comparing more similar price points and spec load-outs. Versus the 13-inch MacBook Air Compared with the base 13-inch

MacBook Air, Google ’ s Pixel has a great deal of resemblances. It ’ s priced around the exact same, however in fact is available in as more expensive that the OS X ultraportable, at $ 1299 and $ 1449 for choices with Wi-Fi only, and Wi-Fi + LTE networking. Exactly what does the Pixel offer to validate the added expense? It does have a denser display, with 239 ppi on an almost 13-inch display. Which display is touch sensitive, which isn ’ t something Apple could claim. But until now, it hasn ’ t displayed much about how touch may deal with ChromeOS, though it has actually supposedly been “ optimized ” for finger-based input. An additional location where the Chromebook Pixel falls short of its competitors is

in local storage space. 32GB on the Wi-Fi model and 64GB on the LTE version is small compared to the MacBook Air, which is already pushing it with 128GB. LTE is nice to have, but, with the frequency of hotspots and modems, arguably less important than more offline-accessible storage space. The Chromebook Pixel is very much intended at the exact same market as the MacBook Air, with Google

worrying that it ’ s an upscale device. But regardless of what looks to be a stunning screen, this shows up with a much more experimental, touch-enabled variation of an OS that has yet to show itself with general consumers, suggesting that the reasons to choose Google ’ s brave new laptop computer over the Air possibly aren ’ t as obvious as Google would ’ ve hoped. Versus the 128GB Area Pro I can ’ t assistance however consider the Chromebook Pixel in relation to something like the Area Pro, another premium computing gadget from a business that has actually historically avoided making its own pcs. Given, the differences in execution in between the two are rather staggering, however it ’ s hard not to look at both devices as fresh steps into a market significantly driven by book hardware. The Pixel certainly has the Surface Pro beat when it comes to sheer screen size and resolution (it has a 12.85 ″ display going for 2560 x 1700, contrasted

to the Pro ’ s 10.6 ″ panel going for 1920 x 1080), but the Area Pro seems to sport better touch support with its included stylus and Wacom digitizer. It ’ s too early to state whether or not one device has a conclusive benefit of the various other since of their apparently comparable processors (though the Pixel could possibly squeak by due to the fact that of its a little quicker chipset), however we ’ ll go back to that once we get our hands on an evaluation unit. Again, the Pixel could fail with its paltry 32GB of internal storage space (though individuals who spring for the LTE model will have around 64GB to play with). Sure, having a terabyte of cloud storage is orderly, but those in demand of genuine speed will like the Pro ’ s SSDs and memory card slot. The other big question mark here is Chrome OS itself. The Chromebook is an extremely good-looking little equipment that seems to have some horse power under the hood to boot, however I ’ m curious whether or not individuals will select to plunk down up-wards of $ 1299 for a computer that exists outside of the two entrenched environments that have actually dominated consumer computing. Windows 8 isn ’ t a beaming star yet either, but it ’ s far from a company ’ s side job. In the end … While the Air and Surface Pro have their share of benefits, it ’ s still a little prematurely to compose the Chromebook Pixel off entirely. It might just be the right computer at the correct time to give Chrome OS the boost it actually

requires, but for now Google

has to make a much better case for why people should spend $ 1299 on a computer that depends upon the cloud rather of, you know, anything else.

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Tale Of The Tape: Chromebook Pixel Vs. Surface Pro Vs. MacBook Air

cbp

Google hasn’t always been known for making breathtaking hardware, but today’s announcement of the Chromebook Pixel — arguably one of the best-looking laptops ever made, if nothing else — means that may no longer be the case.

Still, you can’t be blamed for being wary of shelling out a decent chunk of money on Google’s first foray into laptops, let alone a Chromebook of all things, so here’s a preliminary look at how the Chromebook Pixel stacks up against two prominent rivals in the computing space: the stock version of Apple’s 13-inch MacBook Air and Microsoft’s Surface Pro.

*Note that we compared the base MBA and the surface Pro with upgraded storage, to establish a better baseline in terms of comparing more similar price points and spec load-outs. 

Versus the 13-inch MacBook Air

Compared to the base 13-inch MacBook Air, Google’s Pixel has a lot of similarities. It’s priced around the same, but actually comes in as more expensive that the OS X ultraportable, at $ 1299 and $ 1449 for options with Wi-Fi only, and Wi-Fi + LTE networking. What does the Pixel offer to justify the extra cost? It does have a denser display, with 239 ppi on a nearly 13-inch display. And that screen is touch sensitive, which isn’t something Apple can claim. But until now, it hasn’t shown off much about how touch might work with ChromeOS, though it has reportedly been “optimized” for finger-based input.

Another place where the Chromebook Pixel falls short of its competition is in local storage. 32GB on the Wi-Fi model and 64GB on the LTE version is tiny compared to the MacBook Air, which is already pushing it with 128GB. LTE is nice to have, but, with the prevalence of hotspots and modems, arguably less important than more offline-accessible storage space.

The Chromebook Pixel is very much aimed at the same market as the MacBook Air, with Google stressing that it’s an upscale device. But despite what looks to be a beautiful screen, this arrives with an even more experimental, touch-enabled version of an OS that has yet to prove itself with general consumers, meaning that the reasons to opt for Google’s brave new laptop over the Air perhaps aren’t as apparent as Google would’ve hoped.

Versus the 128GB Surface Pro

I can’t help but think about the Chromebook Pixel in relation to something like the Surface Pro, another premium computing device from a company that has historically shied away from making its own computers. Granted, the differences in execution between the two are pretty staggering, but it’s hard not to look at both devices as fresh steps into a market increasingly driven by novel hardware.

The Pixel certainly has the Surface Pro beat when it comes to sheer screen size and resolution (it has a 12.85″ display running at 2560 x 1700, compared to the Pro’s 10.6″ panel running at 1920 x 1080), but the Surface Pro seems to sport better touch support with its included stylus and Wacom digitizer. It’s too early to say whether or not one device has a definitive advantage of the other because of their seemingly similar processors (though the Pixel could squeak by because of its slightly quicker chipset), but we’ll return to that once we get our hands on a review unit.

Again, the Pixel may fall flat with its paltry 32GB of internal storage (though folks who spring for the LTE model will have around 64GB to play with). Sure, having a terabyte of cloud storage is neat, but those in need of real speed will prefer the Pro’s SSDs and memory card slot.

The other big question mark here is Chrome OS itself. The Chromebook is a very handsome little machine that seems to have some horsepower under the hood to boot, but I’m curious whether or not people will choose to plunk down upwards of $ 1299 for a computer that exists outside of the two entrenched environments that have dominated consumer computing. Windows 8 isn’t a shining star yet either, but it’s far from a company’s side project.

In the end…

While the Air and Surface Pro have their share of advantages, it’s still a little too early to write the Chromebook Pixel off completely. It may just be the right computer at the right time to give Chrome OS the boost it really needs, but for now Google needs to make a better case for why people should spend $ 1299 on a computer that hinges on the cloud instead of, you know, anything else.

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‘How I hacked Hollywood,’ a cautionary tale

Scarlet Johansson (credit GQ.com)

Four years ago, Chris Chaney was jobless, depressed, and browsing the web when he fell upon a compromising photo of Miley Cyrus, which would dramatically alter the course of his life. The photo raised questions for Chaney; who stole this picture, how did he do it, and how hard could it be for him to do the same?

Fast forward three years. Chaney is laying in bed, his body speckled with red lasers from the guns of the federal agents that surrounded him. Now a prolific Hollywood hacker, his antics had got him noticed by the wrong crowd. So how exactly did a man that didn’t know an ounce of code, and had only owned a computer for a few years, gain access to celebrities’ private emails and photographs? With a lot of time, and very little…

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The Tale Of A Wolfram Research Co-founder And His Beloved “Periodic Table Table” [Video]

ignobel-periodicd-470-0209

Out of the annals of history comes this doozy. A man known by the name of Theodore Gray is a co-founder of Wolfram Research, best known as the creator of Wolfram Alpha, the two-year-old computational answer engine, which Siri uses for 25 percent of her mobile searches.

Along with Stephen Wolfram, Gray helped develop Mathematica, the computational software used in technical computing that makes Wolfram Alpha, among other things, tick. He is an author, polymath, and, it seems, an amateur Chemist — or should I say, element collector. Yes, as the story goes, about 10 years ago, he built and created his own wooden “periodic table table” (presumably on company time), complete with compartments underneath in which Gray collects samples of the periodic table’s elements. This feat of carpentry, Rams-ian design, and wizardry won him an “Ig Nobel Prize” in Chemistry back in 2002.

Yesterday, a new video, or rather episode of “Bytesize Science,” emerged on YouTube wherein Gray discusses the tale behind his periodic table table. The video has been being passed around, and was tipped to us (thanks to Kirk Zamieroski). We thought it was worth sharing, based on pure awesomeness, the high quality kitsch, and DIY mastery. Luckily no radioactive elements made it into the table — or at least we didn’t spot any lead. No one was hurt in the making of the table, as far as we know, other than perhaps Schrodinger’s cat?

As the video’s uploader points out, Gray has gone on to win less Ig Nobel awards, becoming the 2011 winner of the ACS Grady Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public, and the periodic table table is a “testament” to his love for chemistry — and his compulsive eBay purchasing habits.

We hope you enjoy.

(Check out Theodore Gray’s website here.)

Image credit: Popular Mechanics



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inPulse and WIMM One: the tale of two smartwatches (video)

inPulse and WIMM One: the tale of two smartwatches (video)

We’re no strangers to watches here at Engadget, but smartwatches — tiny wearable computers capable of running apps with SDKs to match — are still a rare breed. The best known examples are probably Fossil’s Meta Watch, Allerta’s inPulse Smartwatch and WIMM Labs’ WIMM One, all of which are primarily targeted at developers. We recently had the opportunity to spend some quality time with both the inPulse (over the holidays) and the WIMM One (during CES), and despite some similarities, each smartwatch takes a completely different approach to running apps on your wrist. While neither product is quite ready for prime time, both show promise as “fourth screen” devices, even for those of us who don’t normally wear a watch. So go ahead — hit the break and find out how these wearable computers stack up.

Continue reading inPulse and WIMM One: the tale of two smartwatches (video)

inPulse and WIMM One: the tale of two smartwatches (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 07 Feb 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Avengers: A True Tale Of Bad Customer Service

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With all this talk of 360-degree customer service and Zappos ninjas who help babies out of burning buildings while taking orders for clogs, it’s nice to remember that for every heartwarming tale of customer satisfaction there is a dude like Paul Christoforo.

The tale begins with a controller accessory. It’s called the Avonger en-kontrol (my misspelling) and it’s some kind of octopus that helps you press more buttons on your game controller. We wrote it up in February 2011 so you can check it out there. A quick web search will bring up the actual product. I’m not about to give them any Google Juice.

Plenty of people pre-ordered and waited patiently for the devices to ship. One customer, Dave, emailed the company with a question:

From: Dave
To: Ocean Marketing
Dec 16, 2011, at 1:34 PM

I ordered 2 of the upcoming PS3 controllers (invoice xxxxxxxxx—Nov 3, 2011). Any chance of getting an update of when these items will ship? I’m not really happy about being forced to pay upfront then have the advertised date of “Early December” be completely missed without any sort of update on availability. I really need one of them for a X-mas present as well. Anyways, looking forward to finally using one of these bad boys. Thanks and happy holidays.

-Dave

The “marketing guru” Paul Christoforo (who runs SEO expert site OceanMarketing (amazing, right?)) eventually gets into a heated Internet exchange with Dave (read it all on Penny Arcade when it comes back up) and ends his tirade with this gem of social media marketing done right (warning, NSFW language):

From: Ocean Marketing
To: Dave
Dec 26, 2011 2:19 PM

LOL Thanks for the Free PR I know the Editor N Chief of Kotaku , IGN , Engadget I’ll be meeting them at CES .The noise complaint was for people high up on the food chain in a corporate world of real estate you have no clue about. Thanks for the Rice Rocket Compliment too love me some motorcycle . Send that over to Engadget you look like a complete moron swearing and sending your customer service complaints to a magazine as if they will post it or even pay attention do you think you’re the first or the last what are they going to do demand us to tell you were your shipment is or ask for a refund on your behalf … Really … Welcome to the Internet ? Son Im 38 I wwebsite as on the internet when you were a sperm in your daddys balls and before it was the internet, thanks for the welcome to message wurd up. Grow up you look like a complete child bro. I Don’t have my controller so im gonna cry to the world … Really ?? Hey take that free time and do something more productive. All you had to do was check the like everyone else , people have inquired but you’re the douchiest of them all J

To all our pre-order customers looking for information on the status of their orders after a busy couple of months The PS3 Avengers are on their way from our Manufacturing plant overseas. We are aware that everyone is anticipating having their Avengers under their Christmas Tree and were doing our best to get these orders shipped out as fast as possible. We appreciate you as loyal customers and for supporting our company. Customers will start receiving their products this week before Christmas and After Christmas and into the New Year. As a token of our appreciation we are offering all our pre-order customers and new customers 10$ off your next order with us just enter Avenger1001 at Checkout. Thank you and Happy Holidays!

Oh and FYI When a street date gets pushed by a publisher on a video game you pre ordered do you cry to them too ?

You just got told bitch … welcome to the real internet check kotaku in 2 weeks when they are reviewing free PS3 Avengers we send them as well as G4 and all the other majors hell yeah , don’t forget to check Amazon, gamestop.com, play n trade , Myers , Frys and a ton of other local stores coming your way you think you speak for billions son your just a kid you speak for yourself no one cares what you think that’s why were growing and moving 20-50 thousand controllers a month. We do value our customers but sometimes we get children like you we just have to put you in the corner with your im stupid hat on. See you at CES , E3 , Pax East ….? Oh wait you have to ask mom and pa dukes your not an industry professional and you have no money on snap you just got told.

If you tl;dred that, here is one of the pertinent points:

Son Im 38 I wwebsite as on the internet when you were a sperm in your daddys balls and before it was the internet, thanks for the welcome to message wurd up.

This is the 38-year-old marketing manager and LinkedIn User (and presumably president of a company that is apparently trying to make a living selling marketing accessories) responding to a customer. I doubt this strategy is in the Amazon CSR handbook.

The fact that I’m writing about this feeds directly into Christoforo’s sense that any PR is good PR, but I assure you that’s not the case. Battles against Internet tag teams that involve Kotaku, SomethingAwful, and Reddit rarely end well and products built (or marketed) by petulant 38-year-old former real estate salesmen rarely, if ever, ship. It’s easy to build a buzz on the Internet, and it’s just as easy to kill it in a few keystrokes. Wurd up.



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Nokia Lumia 800 vs. Nokia N9: the tale of the tape

Sure, they might look the same, but are they actually the same? Inside that smooth, shapely polycarbonate shell lies internals that are actually significantly different between these two. How different? Well, the guy on the left, the newly-unveiled Lumia 800, has a 1.4GHz Qualcomm processor paired with 512MB of RAM and 16GB of storage. The guy on the right? That’s the ill-fated N9, and it packs a 1GHz TI OMAP chip with 1GB of RAM and up to 64GB of storage. Inside the chart below lies the information you need, and the deltas you crave.

Continue reading Nokia Lumia 800 vs. Nokia N9: the tale of the tape

Nokia Lumia 800 vs. Nokia N9: the tale of the tape originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 26 Oct 2011 08:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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