Posts Tagged ‘sensors’

Simplisafe Adds New Sensors, Services To Their DIY Home Security System

With competitors like Canary and Nest coming quickly behind, Simplisafe, a small, Boston-based security company, is pulling out the stops. After updating their software and mobile interface late last year they’ve updated their hardware and added a glass break sensor, one of the least expensive in the industry, to their arsenal of hardware. Read More

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Simplisafe Adds New Sensors, Services To Their DIY Home Security System

With competitors like Canary and Nest coming quickly behind, Simplisafe, a small, Boston-based security company, is pulling out the stops. After updating their software and mobile interface late last year they’ve updated their hardware and added a glass break sensor, one of the least expensive in the industry, to their arsenal of hardware. Read More

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The Dash Builds Wearable Fitness Sensors Into The Headphones You’re Using Anyway

the-dash-

We’re finally starting to see some real consolidation around wearable tech, and Kickstarter project The Dash is a great example of that trend in action. It’s a pair of Bluetooth in-ear headphones that also offer up performance tracking via in-built health and body sensors. With passive noise cancellation, pass-through audio transparency when you need it, and an ear bone transduction microphone, these really do seem like gadgets that take existing gadget real estate (everyone uses headphones at some point) and make the most out of it.

the-dash-The Dash gets rid of wires entirely, offering instead a pair of completely discrete earbuds that can work with a connected smartphone, or completely on their own via an internal 4GB of storage for loading up your own songs directly. That would probably be enough to recommend them to athletes and active users who want to get the cables out of the way, but The Dash also has an ear bone mic that eliminates background interference, and it acts as a fully fledged activity tracker, with built-in heart rate, oxygen saturation and energy-expenditure monitoring.

You can also control playback from the on-device touch sensitive surface, as well as turn off passive audio noise cancellation to fully hear your surroundings, which is handy if you’re running in a busy city. The left bud controls your activity monitoring (you can get audio updates on your current measured stats), while the right one manages audio controls, including audio volume and playlist selection.

the-dashDash creator Bragi, which is based in Munich, wants to turn the gadget into a broadly focused platform, however, with an SDK for third-party developers that allows them to reimagine what it can offer users. They see it as a communication device for emergency responders, for instance, or as an in-ear translation device for communicating in foreign languages, or as one part of a larger overall sensor system for use in medicine.

It’s easy to see why The Dash has raised over $ 250,000 of its $ 260,000 goal already, given the starting price of $ 199 for new backers for pre-order pledges. If it works as advertised, the gadget will replace a number of different devices in one convenient, comfortable package. The team has a great pedigree; CEO Nikolaj Hviid is a former design chief at Harman, and so has experience building consumer products for the mass market.

The anticipated delivery date for The Dash is October,2014, which means we don’t have long to wait to see if these really can deliver on their apparent potential. It’s not quite One Wearable To Rule Them All, but it’s getting there, and that’s welcome news for consumers overwhelmed with niche products that offer relatively little in the way of lasting value.

Related Posts:

The Dash Builds Wearable Fitness Sensors Into The Headphones You’re Using Anyway

the-dash-

We’re finally starting to see some real consolidation around wearable tech, and Kickstarter project The Dash is a great example of that trend in action. It’s a pair of Bluetooth in-ear headphones that also offer up performance tracking via in-built health and body sensors. With passive noise cancellation, pass-through audio transparency when you need it, and an ear bone transduction microphone, these really do seem like gadgets that take existing gadget real estate (everyone uses headphones at some point) and make the most out of it.

the-dash-The Dash gets rid of wires entirely, offering instead a pair of completely discrete earbuds that can work with a connected smartphone, or completely on their own via an internal 4GB of storage for loading up your own songs directly. That would probably be enough to recommend them to athletes and active users who want to get the cables out of the way, but The Dash also has an ear bone mic that eliminates background interference, and it acts as a fully fledged activity tracker, with built-in heart rate, oxygen saturation and energy-expenditure monitoring.

You can also control playback from the on-device touch sensitive surface, as well as turn off passive audio noise cancellation to fully hear your surroundings, which is handy if you’re running in a busy city. The left bud controls your activity monitoring (you can get audio updates on your current measured stats), while the right one manages audio controls, including audio volume and playlist selection.

the-dashDash creator Bragi, which is based in Munich, wants to turn the gadget into a broadly focused platform, however, with an SDK for third-party developers that allows them to reimagine what it can offer users. They see it as a communication device for emergency responders, for instance, or as an in-ear translation device for communicating in foreign languages, or as one part of a larger overall sensor system for use in medicine.

It’s easy to see why The Dash has raised over $ 250,000 of its $ 260,000 goal already, given the starting price of $ 199 for new backers for pre-order pledges. If it works as advertised, the gadget will replace a number of different devices in one convenient, comfortable package. The team has a great pedigree; CEO Nikolaj Hviid is a former design chief at Harman, and so has experience building consumer products for the mass market.

The anticipated delivery date for The Dash is October,2014, which means we don’t have long to wait to see if these really can deliver on their apparent potential. It’s not quite One Wearable To Rule Them All, but it’s getting there, and that’s welcome news for consumers overwhelmed with niche products that offer relatively little in the way of lasting value.

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Google’s 5 Bets on the Future: Robots and Sensors

Jan.14 (Bloomberg) — Google just announced its latest takeover: A .2 billion deal to purchase Nest, a company specializing in thermostats and smoke detec…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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iPhone Rumors: Curved Screens And More Precise Touch Sensors

The next generations of iPhones could incorporate screens with curved edges and touch sensors capable of tracking different levels of pressure.

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Apple Reportedly Developing Large Curved Screen iPhones For Late 2014, Better Touchscreen Sensors

iPhone-New

Apple is said to be working on two curved display iPhone models for the “second half of next year,” according to a source speaking to Bloomberg, with a likely released planned for the third quarter, and building better touchscreen sensors that introduce fine pressure sensitivity for later devices to be introduced after that.

These new iPhones for 2014 would come in 4.7 and 5.5-inch flavors, according to the report, meaning that Apple would be introducing not one, but two different models at the same time, in theory. We’ve seen reports of Apple working on different models of large-screen devices in the past, including one from the Wall Street Journal that suggests it’s been working on different tests of devices with screen sizes between 4.8 and 6 inches. This is the first time we’ve really heard firm information about a possible release date for said devices, from a source as generally reliable as Bloomberg. A Japanese iOS rumor site claimed a September launch for a large-screen iPhone late in October, however, and two reliable analyst sources predict a 4.7-inch iPhone 6 bound for stores in late 2014.

Apple also introduced precedent for doing two models of new iPhone at once this year with the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c, so the idea that it could do so again in the future makes some sense. But two new larger-screened devices at once does seem like a stretch – thought if Apple retained an iPhone 5c as its third, budget device and added two more to the mid-tier and high-end range, that might allow it to do so without adding crazy complexity to its product lineup.

The sensor developments are potentially more interesting to those who find the current screen size of the iPhone adequate; true pressure sensitivity (currently, some crude extent of that is possible via the iPhone’s accelerometer) would make drawing and handwriting applications on the iPhone and iPad much, much better. Apple could sell the devices as professional-level artistic devices if it introduces those kinds of features, in addition to just making things better for everyday users who want to jot notes and doodle, for example, or perform minor photo touch-ups.

It’s very early days to make any kind of judgement about the likely accuracy of these claims, but the source gives it some weight. Apple’s iPhone joining the ranks of bigger-screened devices definitely makes sense as a next move for the lineup, but curved glass manufacturing also seems quite expensive at this point for Apple to be considering launching two new devices with that feature at once.

Via 9to5Mac. Photo courtesy MyVoucherCodes.co.uk.

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do new kinect sensors for 360 will work on xbox 360 arcade console?

Question by : do new kinect sensors for 360 will work on xbox 360 arcade console?
I have heard that the new device is coming for xbox 360. will the new kinect sensors will work on previous xbox 360 arcade console?

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Science Nation – Home Sensors Enable Seniors to Live Independently

Science Nation - Home Sensors Enable Seniors to Live Independently

People are living longer, and they desire to live as independently as possible in their senior years. But, independent lifestyles come with risks, such as de…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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By Wrapping Sensors In A Plushie, “Teddy The Guardian” Aims To Sell Medical Tech For Kids

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In only a few months, the founders of IDerma, a medical technology start-up based out of Zagreb, Croatia, have developed and launched what they’re marketing as medical sensor technology for children. But unlike the sleek Scanadu Scout, this one takes the form of a teddy bear.

The product is called Teddy the Guardian, a plushie installed with sensors that measure heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and temperature, and then relay that data via Bluetooth to a parent’s phone. The sensors are scattered around the bear’s body; pressing a finger to the bear’s paw, for instance, takes heart rate and oxygen levels.

The idea behind disguising medical tech as a lovable toy is to provide parents and pediatricians more accurate, consistent data points. When a child is stressed out about going to the doctor, his or her vital signs will be skewed. Taking data points when the child is in a neutral emotional state can give doctors a wealth of good information to compare against when something is wrong.

Of course, the bear is just as much a tool for keeping parents attuned to their child’s general well-being as it is a medical device. IDerma co-founder Josipa Majić said that for busy parents who don’t have as much time to connect with their kids, the data can show when their child’s day has been particularly stressful or problematic.

Later versions of Teddy will be equipped with sensors specific to different medical conditions, Majić said. Blood sugar level measurements for diabetic children, for instance.

While the United States and Europe comprise Teddy the Guardian’s primary markets, China and India are also of interest. The increase in disposable income in rapidly developing countries has resulted in more money spent on a family’s first-born child, Majić said.

“We see the mommy community in the developing world as the quite the disrupters. They spend at least some time, up to 8 hours a day, on their cell phones and smartphones. 90 and even 91% [of their time] in China. In India, they believe tech makes them a better mom.”

Teddy the Guardian has already cleared its biggest hurdle: getting FDA approval on the medical technology. Although IDerma has its own sensors, Majić said they opted to outsource sensor development to another healthcare company, the name of which she declined to give.

The reason is simply because going through FDA and CE approval processes are expensive — too much so for a start-up. To get the green light, a company needs a very competent legal team, Majić said, which most cannot afford.

“These regulations are really start-up unfriendly. I would even say hostile,” she said.

It is difficult for U.S.-based start-ups to get approved by the FDA, she said, not to mention those from Central or Eastern Europe. In Europe, each country has its own legal specifications, which requires an even bigger legal team.

The company is currently bootstrapped, funded by IDerma’s past projects. Majić said they were considering either launching a crowdfunding campaign or applying to accelerators in London and Silicon Valley. They have, however, begun taking pre-orders and are talking with several multinational companies.

Outside of health trackers like Jawbone Up, Scanadu is the main competition in the world of medical tricorders for consumers, though Teddy the Guardian occupies a distinct space in its focus on pediatrics. Having FDA approval on the sensors is a leg up, meaning Teddy may be able to get out on the market before competing medical devices proliferate too much.

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