Posts Tagged ‘rolls’

Microsoft rolls out first Xbox One ad, highlights NFL features and Skype integration

Microsoft rolls out first Xbox One ad, highlights NFL features and Skype integration

Now that we know the release date for Microsoft’s Xbox One, it’s only natural for the company to start an ad campaign showcasing some features that are part of its next-generation console. Unlike what most would expect, however, the first video advertising the Xbox One isn’t touting one of its main purposes: gaming. Instead, this particular 31-second spot focuses heavily on the new Xbox’s integration with Skype and NFL-tailored features — some of which include watching games live, built-in Fantasy Football and having access to personalized highlights. Of course, this is only the beginning, so expect to catch an ad with casual gamers actors playing Titanfall or FIFA 14 in the not-so-distant future. Check out the video for yourself right past the jump.

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Source: Xbox (YouTube)

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LG G Pad 8.3 revealed ahead of IFA, rolls out globally in Q4

LG G Pad 83 revealed ahead of IFA

Following up on its initial tease from earlier this week, LG has officially revealed the G Pad 8.3 ahead of IFA. The slate’s positioned as the next step from its G2 smartphone, and the company claims it’s the first eight-inch tablet with a 1920 x 1200 WUXGA (Widescreen Ultra Extended Graphics Array) full HD screen. The device features a 4,600mAh battery, and runs Jelly Bean 4.2.2 atop a 1.7 GHz quad-core Snapdragon 600 processor aided by 2GB of RAM. Despite all that, it’s just 8.33m thick and weighs 338 grams. Software enhancements include QPair and QSlide — the former lets you receive messages and calls from JB-equipped Android phones on the G Pad itself, while the latter allows for three apps to run on-screen at once. What’s more, with KnockOn you simply tap the screen twice to wake it up. The G Pad 8.3 will be available globally beginning in Q4 in your choice of black or white with 16 GB of storage. No word on pricing just yet, but expect a hands-on once we catch it on the show floor.

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Sphero 2.0 rolls out at speeds ‘slightly slower than a Lamborghini’ (video)

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A robotic ball you control with your phone? What’s not to like? Well, we managed to find a few things when we took a look at the first generation back in 2011 — that’s what we do. Most of the criticisms of the original Sphero came down to pricing and the admittedly short list of things it could actually do at the time. Sure it was pretty great at driving feline friends completely nuts — but that alone wasn’t enough to justify the $ 130 price tag. Orbotix has made some improvements since then, and more importantly, the open API has given users a much fuller experience, with around 20 or so compatible titles currently available on the iPhone.

This month, the company is refreshing the device itself, with the simply titled Sphero 2.0. The particularly astute among you will no doubt notice that nothing has really changed here from an aesthetic standpoint. Nope, it’s the same white plastic ball with the cartoony Sphero mascot on one side and all of the fine print (FCC info, “Made in China,” etc.) on the other, with a series of interlinking, barely visible lines across its surface. There have been some hardware changes to the toy, but everything’s on the inside, namely brighter lights and faster speeds — as the company insists in its press material, it’s “only slightly slower than a Lamborghini.” Of course, scale’s important here.

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Garmin Rolls With The Punches Of Changing Navigation Game With Smartphone HUD For Cars

garmin-hud

Garmin built its empire on dedicated GPS devices, but those are obviously facing extinction in the face of smartphones that can replicate their function without requiring an expensive secondary hardware purchase. Today, Garmin announced a device that could help it capitalize on its changing role in the navigation ecosystem, while still allowing it to see hardware to consumers.

The Garmin HUD is just that, a heads-up-display that sits on your dash and projects a simple set of basic navigation data onto a transparent film affixed to your windshield. This replicates some features found in very expensive and well-appointed luxury cars, and it’s relatively inexpensive at $ 129.99.

Information displayed on the readout includes current speed, speed limit, an indicator to show when you turn next and the distance to said turn, as well as estimated arrival time. There’s no detailed map or points of interest, which is actually very good in that it will help keep drivers more focused on the road. It also shows yo upcoming traffic delays and traffic camera locations, and auto-adjusts for night and day. The smartphone HUD will work with any Bluetooth-capable smartphone running Android, iOS or Windows Phone 8 that can run Garmin’s StreetPilot and Navigon applications, and will arrive this summer for $ 129.99.

Garmin and others who make third-party smartphone apps that offer navigation services face an increasingly challenging market: Apple and Google both offer free software that does turn-by-turn navigation on mobile devices, either built-in or free, and offerings like Waze (which Google just acquired) really does a fantastic job of giving you all the bells and whistles for free, with a system that’s intelligent and adapts to changing traffic and road conditions in real time.

How do you differentiate as a dedicated navigation company? Offering your own accessory hardware is one very good way. The HUD from Garmin provides a real, tangible advantage to using Garmin’s paid apps over the free and easy competition. Until HUD projection becomes a built-in feature of every smartphone or in-car infotainment system, at least.

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Android updates, Netflix rolls out Max, and ‘The Terminator’: 90 Seconds on The Verge

I couldn’t believe it. After all the confusion, the deception… could this nasty turnabout be true? Was this the person that had been testing us all along?

“I… I don’t understand.”

The killer snorted. “Of couse not. Of course you don’t ‘understand.’ You don’t have the capacity. Do you know how simple it was to concoct this scenario? Oh, it should have been much harder. Much harder, indeed. But for you lot…”

The killer trailed off, then smiled. “For you it took all of 90 seconds to seal your fate.”

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Firefox gets a new logo, rolls out desktop and Android Beta updates

Firefox gets a new logo, rolls out Beta update that gives devs access to its Social API

Firefox is an ever evolving beast, and that includes both its friendly orange fox logo, and its Beta channel browser. Today Mozilla unveiled the fourth Firefox logo, a (slightly) less textured and glossy icon for its favored web browser — and if you’re . Meanwhile, the latest update for for Firefox Beta brings access to the company’s Social API and, consequently, Share buttons to the platform — so Facebook fanatics can have one-click sharing of images, articles, videos and links from the Firefox toolbar. The new Beta is also getting a Mixed Content Blocker that prevents HTTP (read: nonsecure) content from loading on HTTPS websites. Plus, there’s a new Network Monitor feature to let devs see how quickly individual page components load and optimizations for OS X 10.7 that enable its scrollbar style and and the scroll bounce behavior Apple fans love.

Oh, and for you mobile fans, the Android Beta was updated today, too. Now, it’s got an auto-hide Awesome Bar, a URL autocomplete function and an updated RSS feed reader that allows you to add feeds to with a long press on the aforementioned Awesome Bar. Pretty awesome, gents, now let’s get these Beta features into a full release, and it’ll be really awesome.

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Source: Mozilla Future Releases blog (1), (2), Mozilla about:pixels blog

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AMD rolls out Elite desktop APUs with Splashtop game streaming

AMD rolls out Elite desktop APUs with Splashtop game streaming

AMD has already shown what its mobile Richland APUs can do, and it’s now ready to reveal their desktop equivalents’ potential. The company’s new, full-power A6, A8 and A10 Elite processors are more evolutionary bumps than overhauls, but they still have a few clear advantages over last year’s Trinity chips. Along with a bump in Turbo Boosted frequencies to between 4.1GHz and 4.4GHz (3.5GHz to 4.1GHz normally), the updates ship with Radeon HD 8000 video and can handle speedier DDR3-2133 memory (on the A10). Wireless is just as important as it is with the firm’s newest mobile processors: the desktop Elites improve streaming games to other devices using Splashtop, with relatively little lag when modern AMD processors are on both ends.

As for performance? AMD didn’t have the luxury of comparing against Intel’s Haswell chips at the time it gave us benchmarks, but it did claim big gains over Ivy Bridge in both general-purpose computing and gaming. A 4.1GHz A10-6800K is up to 3.3 times faster in OpenCL than a 3.2GHz Core i5-3470, and games like Bioshock Infinite are playable at 1080p (if barely) where they’re unusable with the HD 3000 graphics of Intel’s CPU. Performance boosts over Trinity are a more modest eight to 21 percent, however. If you want to know how well the Elite line fares in the real world, it won’t take much effort to find out. AMD is shipping its processors this month, at very frugal prices that range from $ 69 to $ 142.

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Source: AMD

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Lenovo rolls out extra-compact ThinkCentre Edge 62z all-in-one for $549

Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 62z stuffs an all-in-one into a tiny space for $  549

Some of Lenovo’s pro customers can be very fussy: hospitals and schools want multiple computers in a small area, but without skimping on the usual features they’d expect from desktops. If any PC could resolve those contradictory demands, it might be the company’s new ThinkCentre Edge 62z. The extra-angular design purportedly fits a 18.5-inch all-in-one into a third of the space of a 20-inch display, all while carrying up to a Core i3 processor and a DVD burner. Whether or not you see the 62z as a feat of engineering, the design has some room to grow with up to 8GB of RAM and a 1TB hard drive. The price may be the real clincher for some customers — Lenovo expects this lower-tier ThinkCentre Edge to cost $ 549 when it reaches the US in May, which could squeeze it into a few more IT budgets.

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Via: Far East Gizmos

Source: Lenovo Singapore

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ZBoard rolls out the San Francisco Special for the hilly city by the bay (video)

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The men at ZBoard made quite the splash at SXSW Interactive earlier this week– riding an electric skateboard around the streets and conference halls of Austin will get you all kinds of attention, after all. Still, for all the love they got at the occasion, the startup decided to hold its most current announce until the kickoff of Expand– for an essential reason: this electric skateboard is a tribute to the hillsides and winding streets of the city by the bay. ZBoard’s San Francisco Special ups the game for the Kickstarted company, extending the board’s range to 20 freeway or 14 city miles. The wheels likewise got an upgrade to high-traction 110mm designs, while the braking system got a nice bump, as well.

Naturally, with along all those renovations comes a bit more weight– the currently large board now appears at 32 pounds. Those who were wishing for a lighter-weight solution akin to the Boosted Board will need to try to keep holding their breath– baseding upon the ZBoard’s creators, its area stated it wouldn’t mind adding a couple of pounds to increase variety, and as such, there’s a four-pound jump from the ZBoard Pro. But, you know, if all goes baseding upon strategy, you should not be carry this thing around too much. For when you do, however, there’s that padded handle.Com ments

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‘User friendly’ XBMC for Android build rolls out for set-top boxes and mobile devices

'User friendly' XBMC for Android build rolls out for settop boxes and mobile devices

If you’ve been waiting to attempt out XBMC on your Android, it appears now is the time. While beta and every night builds were currently offered, the team behind it has actually lastly readied a release it states is “end user friendly,” ready to run on a lot of any gadget. It achieves that accomplishment by offloading video player duties to another app, in this case MX Player, in order to get around XBMC’s absence of equipment support for numerous gadgets. After sideloading the 2 essential APKs we had the ability to get it up and running without any difficulty, tossing in add-ins and playing back in your area stored media without a problem. There’s a video to support the release (embedded after the break) but installing it yourself is probably the finest method to get a feel for its video, picture and audio playback abilities.

Gallery: XBMC for Android

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