Posts Tagged ‘recalls’

Tesla formally recalls more than 29,000 Model S wall charging adapters

Tesla may argue that it’s being proactive by replacing Model S wall charging adapters, but that still constitutes a recall by most anyone’s definition. Accordingly, the company has sent a letter (PDF) to the NHTSA announcing a voluntary recall of the …

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Fraunhofer develops extra-small 1Gbps infrared transceiver, recalls our PDA glory days

Fraunhofer develops extrasmall 1Gbps infrared transceiver, recalls our PDA glory days

Our 1997-era selves would pass away with envy right about now. Fraunhofer has actually developed a brand-new generation of infrared transceiver that could transfer information at 1Gbps, or well above anything that our vintage PDAs can manage. While the rate is nothing brand-new by itself– we saw such rates in 2010 Penn State experiments– it’s the size that makes the difference. The laser diode and processing are reliable sufficient to fit into a little module whose transceiver is as big as a “kid’s fingernail.” In idea, the improvement makes infrared once more viable for mobile device syncing, with space to expand: also the existing modern technology can scale to 3Gbps, lead specialist Frank Deicke says, and it could leap to 10Gbps with enough work. Along with the usual refinements, most of the difficulty in getting production equipment rests in persuading the Infrared Data Association to follow Deicke’s work as a standard. If that ever before comes to pass, we may simply break out our PalmPilot’s infrared adapter to try it for old time’s sake.

Filed under: , , Engadget on Fri, 05 Oct 2012 01:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for usage of feeds. Permalink Gizmag|Fraunhofer |. Email this|Remarks

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HP feels the heat, recalls 1040 and 1050 fax machines

HP feels the heat, recalls 1040 and 1050 fax machines

Hey, office workers — listen up. You know that cheap, god-forsaken fax machine that you’ve come to loathe something fierce? Well, if it’s an HP unit, go ahead and peep the model number on the front — don’t worry, we’ll wait. If it says either 1040 or 1050, in addition to being a pain in the ass to operate (like all fax machines are), there’s also a small chance the cursed thing could catch on fire. Of the 1.1 million units sold between 2004 and 2011, only seven documented cases have (literally) gone up in flames, but the risk has instigated a voluntary recall for both models. If you’re among the affected owners, go ahead and unplug the machine from its power source, then give HP a call at (888) 654-9296 to get a rebate. Also, be forewarned that while it’s illegal to sell a recalled product, we’ve found scads of these units currently for sale on eBay. Like the previously recalled HP products, that’s one smokin’ hot deal we’re inclined to skip.

HP feels the heat, recalls 1040 and 1050 fax machines originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 03 Feb 2012 14:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Five Years Later, Apple Recalls The First Generation iPod Nano

burning-flames-yellow-fire

In a move that demonstrates an incredible amount of either customer care or procrastination, Apple has issued a recall for the first generation iPod Nano. Not the one you use as a watch, not the fat one, and not the round one. The original (and in my opinion, the best). Turns out it has a rare overheating problem, by which these warnings usually mean explosion problem.

Only a single battery supplier has actually been implicated, and the few hot devices were only available between September 2005 and January 2006. So if you gave or received a Nano during the 2005 holiday season, better find it before it burns your house down.

Find your serial number using this step by step guide:

Put that sequence into Apple’s handy checker here, and if it’s one of the bad batch yet somehow miraculously has not melted in the last five years (the chance of overheating/catastrophic explosion “increases as the battery ages”), Apple will issue you a replacement. After six weeks.

In other news, Apple still has original iPod Nanos to issue as replacements. Very clever — or have they known about this the whole time?

[via SlashGear]



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Over Melting Danger: Sony Recalls 1.6 Million BRAVIA TVs

Sony-Bravia

Second bad news for Sony today: Following the hack attempts at three of their networks, the company today announced [JP] that it will recall a total of 1.6 million BRAVIA LCD TV sets sold in Japan and other regions. The problem is a backlight component inside the TVs that could overheat and make the upper casing melt.

The eight TVs in question were sold after 2007. Here are the model numbers: KDL-40D3400, KDL-40D3500, KDL-40D3550, KDL-40D3660, KDL-40V3000, KDL-40W3000, KDL-40X3000 and KDL-40X3500.

A Sony spokeswoman told Bloomberg that a total of eleven incidents were reported in Japan since 2008. In this country, Sony started selling five of the TVs affected by the recall in September 2007 (using the model numbers KDL-40X5000/40X5050/40W5000/40V5000/40V3000).

Just 189,000 of the BRAVIAs were sold within Japan, meaning most of the users affected by the recall are probably located in the US and Europe. Sony claims that outside no incidents outside Japan were reported so far but urges owners everywhere to stop using the TVs in question and to immediately contact the company.



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Apple recalls a few Verizon iPad 2s, citing connectivity issues

Several 9to5Mac readers noticed a rather peculiar phenomenon this last week — their freshly-ordered Verizon iPad 2 units shipped all the way from China just fine, only to boomerang back to sender right before delivery time. Now, Reuters has the official word: Apple’s recalling an “extremely small number” of Verizon iPad 2s which were flashed with a duplicate MEID code. Should they have been delivered, users would probably have found themselves unable to connect to 3G, or booted off before long, as Verizon reportedly can only have one device with that unique identifier on the network at once. We’re not sure whether to applaud, but it’s good to see manufacturers taking responsibility for their hardware before it hits shelves.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in]

Apple recalls a few Verizon iPad 2s, citing connectivity issues originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 11 Jun 2011 18:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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HP Issues Another Round Of Notebook Battery Recalls

Remember back last year when HP recalled overheating and exploding batteries? No? Here’s our coverage. Apparently a series somehow escaped the net and now HP is recalling another 162,000 notebook batteries. These batteries were included on laptops sold between July 2007 and May 2008, which according to the CPSC, “can overheat and rupture, posing fire and burn hazards to consumers.” Yeah, it’s best to protect your baby making region and ensure your notebook isn’t packing a time bomb. [CPSC via itnews]



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RIM recalls at least 900 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks, here are the serial numbers

We found the BlackBerry PlayBook to be a pretty solid piece of hardware, but it seems there was a problem batch — an inside source tells us that nearly 1,000 faulty tablets were shipped to Staples, and now they’re being recalled. We’re hoping that Staples (and any other affected retailers) will reach out to customers and inform them of the problem right away, but just in case that doesn’t happen, we’ve compiled a searchable spreadsheet of all 935 alleged serial numbers for you to check against your own. Find it right after the break.

Continue reading RIM recalls at least 900 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks, here are the serial numbers

RIM recalls at least 900 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks, here are the serial numbers originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 14 May 2011 21:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

A problem requiring a “silicon fix” is bad news in the chipset business, and sadly that’s what Intel is announcing. Its new Intel 6 Series chipset, Cougar Point, has been found to have a flaw, something to do with the SATA controller. Intel is indicating that the ports can “degrade over time,” leading to poor i/o performance down the road. All shipments have been stopped and a fix has been implemented for new deliveries, but it sounds like recalls will be starting soon for those with this ticking time bomb silicon within. It isn’t a critical problem right now, though, so if you own a Sandy Bridge Core i5 or Core i7 system keep computing with confidence while looking for a recall notice, but it is bad news for Intel’s bottom line: the company is advising a $ 300 million hit to revenue.

[Thanks, Matt]

Continue reading Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning

Intel finds Sandy Bridge chipset design flaw, shipments stopped and recalls beginning originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 31 Jan 2011 10:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tesla recalls 439 Roadster 2.0 and 2.5 electric cars due to fire hazard

Tesla Motors is pretty proud of the fact that it decided to recall 439 Roadster 2.0 and 2.5 vehicles after a single one saw “a short, smoke and possible fire behind the right front headlamp,” but a fire hazard in every one of 439 shipping products isn’t exactly a ratio to be boasting about. At any rate, nearly a third of its 1,300 vehicles sold are affected by the recall, which “involves the 12v low voltage auxiliary cable from a redundant back up system that provides power to various systems, including the headlamps, taillights, turn signals and hazard lights, and airbags in the unlikely event the primary 12V power fails or drops below a minimum threshold value.” The repair involves checking the routing of the 12V low voltage auxiliary cable and installing a protective sleeve over it, and it should take around an hour to complete. Unless, of course, you’re the Tesla owner residing on the north shore of Kauai. Yeah, we’re talking to you… Mr. Guy with “TESLA” on his Hawaii plate.

[Thanks, Jim]

Continue reading Tesla recalls 439 Roadster 2.0 and 2.5 electric cars due to fire hazard

Tesla recalls 439 Roadster 2.0 and 2.5 electric cars due to fire hazard originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 04 Oct 2010 18:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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