Posts Tagged ‘quantum’

New LG Quantum C900 16GB AT&T Smartphone Windows 7, QWERTY Cell Phone t2

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HEAD CASE DESIGNS MEDIEVAL ARMOURY HARD BACK CASE COVER FOR HTC WINDOWS PHONE 8X
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NSA wants to make a quantum computer that cracks tough encryption

While the NSA can inflitrate many secure systems without breaking a sweat, there are still some encryption methods that it just can’t crack. That may not be a problem in the long term, however. The Washington Post has published documents from Edward …

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CLZ410LG LENMAR LG Quantum C900 Windows 7 Phone Replacement Battery

HEAD CASE DESIGNS MEDIEVAL ARMOURY HARD BACK CASE COVER FOR HTC WINDOWS PHONE 8S

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HEAD CASE DESIGNS MEDIEVAL ARMOURY HARD BACK CASE COVER FOR HTC WINDOWS PHONE 8S
$8.45
End Date: Friday Apr-18-2014 19:53:54 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $8.45
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

HEAD CASE DESIGNS MEDIEVAL ARMOURY HARD BACK CASE COVER FOR HTC WINDOWS PHONE 8X
$8.45
End Date: Friday Apr-18-2014 19:53:59 PDT
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World record setting experiment brings quantum computing a step closer to reality

An artistic rendition of a 'bound exciton' quantum state used to prepare and read out information stored in the form of quantum bits.

Despite recent successes in the field, creating a quantum computer is really hard. For one thing quantum bits in a super positioned state (or qubits, the basic unit of data for quantum computing) have a hard time surviving at room temperature. Typically, these superposition states last for only a few seconds, but in a recent experiment at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby , researchers were able to keep a quantum system alive for a full 39 minutes.

“These lifetimes are at least ten times longer than those measured in previous experiments,” explained Stephanie Simmons from the University of Oxford’s Department of Materials. “Having such robust, as well as long-lived, qubits could prove very helpful for anyone trying to build a quantum computer.” Even so, they aren’t particularly active ones – all of the qubits in the experiment shared the same quantum state. To perform actual calculations (and thus build a functioning quantum computer), a system would need to put multiple qubtis in different quantum states. Sound complicated? It sure is, but it’s a significant step forward to building the ultrafast computing platforms of tomorrow. Eager to learn more? Check out the official press release at the source link below.

[Image Credit: Stephanie Simmons, University of Oxford]

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Source: University of Oxford

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World record setting experiment brings quantum computing a step closer to reality

An artistic rendition of a 'bound exciton' quantum state used to prepare and read out information stored in the form of quantum bits.

Despite recent successes in the field, creating a quantum computer is really hard. For one thing quantum bits in a super positioned state (or qubits, the basic unit of data for quantum computing) have a hard time surviving at room temperature. Typically, these superposition states last for only a few seconds, but in a recent experiment at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby , researchers were able to keep a quantum system alive for a full 39 minutes.

“These lifetimes are at least ten times longer than those measured in previous experiments,” explained Stephanie Simmons from the University of Oxford’s Department of Materials. “Having such robust, as well as long-lived, qubits could prove very helpful for anyone trying to build a quantum computer.” Even so, they aren’t particularly active ones – all of the qubits in the experiment shared the same quantum state. To perform actual calculations (and thus build a functioning quantum computer), a system would need to put multiple qubtis in different quantum states. Sound complicated? It sure is, but it’s a significant step forward to building the ultrafast computing platforms of tomorrow. Eager to learn more? Check out the official press release at the source link below.

[Image Credit: Stephanie Simmons, University of Oxford]

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Source: University of Oxford

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World record setting experiment brings quantum computing a step closer to reality

An artistic rendition of a 'bound exciton' quantum state used to prepare and read out information stored in the form of quantum bits.

Despite recent successes in the field, creating a quantum computer is really hard. For one thing quantum bits in a super positioned state (or qubits, the basic unit of data for quantum computing) have a hard time surviving at room temperature. Typically, these superposition states last for only a few seconds, but in a recent experiment at Oxford University, researchers were able to keep a quantum system alive for a full 39 minutes.

“These lifetimes are at least ten times longer than those measured in previous experiments,” explained Stephanie Simmons from the university’s Department of Materials. “Having such robust, as well as long-lived, qubits could prove very helpful for anyone trying to build a quantum computer.” Even so, they aren’t particularly active ones – all of the qubits in the experiment shared the same quantum state. To perform actual calculations (and thus build a functioning quantum computer), a system would need to put multiple qubtis in different quantum states. Sound complicated? It sure is, but it’s a significant step forward to building the ultrafast computing platforms of tomorrow. Eager to learn more? Check out Oxford’s official press release at the source link below.

[Image Credit: Stephanie Simmons, University of Oxford]

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Source: University of Oxford

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Quantum data lock promises leak-proof security

Quantum cryptography is secure against intruders, since you can’t intercept data in mid-flight without ruining it. The technology won’t always stop leaks, however, which is why the University of Cambridge has developed a new protocol that keeps participants honest. The method combines the theories …

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Google’s Quantum A.I. Lab adds quantum physics to Minecraft

There is seemingly no end to the number of things you can do in Minecraft — and the latest thing is experimenting with quantum physics. A new mod called qCraft, built by none other than Google’s Quantum A.I. Lab Team, adds blocks that exhibit quantum entanglement, superposition, and observer-dependency properties. Some of the new blocks can be “activated” simply by looking at them, while others are prone to disappear at any moment.

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Tetrapod quantum dot LEDs could lead to cheaper, better HDTVs soon

DNP QUANTUM DOTS IN YO TV

Until Sony started shipping its Triluminos HDTVs, the future of quantum dot (QD) technology in real-world products was mostly theoretical. Now, a company called Quantum Materials has started shipping its “Tetrapod Quantum Dots” material to an unnamed Asian electronics manufacturer, hinting at the possibility of other QD-enhanced products on the market. The company didn’t mention any particular devices, but this tech has the potential to create displays that are brighter, more energy-efficient and have greater contrast than the competition.

This technology allows companies to create LED-backlit LCDs using a single material as opposed to several on traditional ones — this supposedly keeps costs low, although the aforementioned Sony HDTVs were anything but cheap. Quantum Materials CEO Stephen Squires specifically claims his company’s tetrapod technology works with fewer dots overall and better manufacturing tech to hit the lowest cost possible. Samsung and LG have shown off quantum dot tech in years past — we’ll eventually find out if either one is the anonymous manufacturer in line to mass produce it.

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Source: Quantum Materials

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Alt-week 8.17.13: Fukushima’s permafrost plan, the rodent afterlife and quantum teleportation

Alt-week takes a look at the best science and alternative tech stories from the last seven days.

Altweek 81713 Fukushima's permafrost plan, the rodent afterlife and quantum teleportation

Two years on, the Fukushima nuclear meltdown is still causing problems, and the Japanese government is looking at a particularly cool way (literally) to address them. Similarly chilling is the prospect that ‘dead’ rats aren’t quite as lifeless as you might think. Do rodents go to heaven? That, we can’t answer, but what we can tell you is that new research shows we’re edging ever closer to a quantum-computing future. This is alt-week.

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Via: The Verge, Gizmodo, Forbes

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