The LG G6 promises superior sound with an upgraded quad-DAC

Details continue to emerge about LG’s upcoming G6 smartphone, and today the company revealed that the device will feature a 32-bit quad-DAC system promising improved sound quality.

The technology gives superior control over each earbud independently, resulting in a clearer, more balanced sound, LG claimed in a press release. The analog output means that while devices like the iPhone are going aux-free, it’s likely the G6 will include a headphone jack, according to GSM Arena. High-performance audio chipset specialist ESS is producing the DAC. All told, the technology is being touted as an improvement over the similar quad-DAC featured in last year’s LG V20 phone, which we praised as being “great for audiophiles.”

The G6 will be unveiled at a press event on February 26th, and will feature an unusual 18:9 aspect ratio screen, according to LG. The device is also water-resistant G6 and reportedly uses Google Assistant, which we expect to become a standard feature on Android flagships this year. Meanwhile, Android Central reports that LG is promising to address the shatter-prone screens and bootloops that plagued previous devices.

Source: The Verge, LG

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Verizon’s ‘LTE Advanced’ network promises 50 percent higher speed

Every wireless carrier has various tests that say its network is the best, but most still view Verizon as the best overall choice when looking for that all-important combo of speed and reliability. (That combo doesn’t come cheap, of course.) Today, the company is announcing a new focus on speed: with the rollout of “LTE Advanced,” Verizon claims that users will see “50 percent higher peak speeds.” The new speed bump is available to users in 461 cities across the country. Of course, it’s going to take significant testing to verify the veracity of Verizon’s claims.

Verizon says that LTE Advanced works by combining the multiple bandwidth channels your phone can use into what’s effectively one bigger, faster pipe to your phone. “Typical” download speed will stay around 5 to 12 Mbps, but combining two channels can net peak speeds up to 225 Mbps — that’s a lot faster than most home broadband, let alone what you’ll usually see on your smartphone. The carrier also says that it can combine three channels for speeds close to 300 Mbps.

Verizon’s estimates for “typical” speeds seem low to us, but there’s no question that two- or three-channel speeds are significantly faster than what the carrier currently offers. Even if Verizon only reaches half of what it promises for peak speeds, it’s a pretty significant boost over the status quo.

It’s not at all clear what circumstances will let your phone take advantage of these higher speeds, however. Verizon vaguely says that it’ll kick in “when you need it most,” typically under conditions with “big data use.” Still, the potential for faster download speeds can’t hurt.

To take advantage of LTE Advanced, you’ll need a relatively recent smartphone — Verizon says Samsung’s Galaxy S6 and S7 are compatible with the service, as well as various Moto Droids and iPhone models. You can see the full list of compatible devices here, and the full list of LTE Advanced cities can be found here.

Source: Verizon

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