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Posts Tagged ‘Processing’

Making Things See: 3D vision with Kinect, Processing, Arduino, and MakerBot (Make: Books)

Making Things See: 3D vision with Kinect, Processing, Arduino, and MakerBot (Make: Books)

Making Things See: 3D vision with Kinect, Processing, Arduino, and MakerBot (Make: Books)

This detailed, hands-on guide provides the technical and conceptual information you need to build cool applications with Microsoft’s Kinect, the amazing motion-sensing device that enables computers to see. Through half a dozen meaty projects, you’ll learn how to create gestural interfaces for software, use motion capture for easy 3D character animation, 3D scanning for custom fabrication, and many other applications.

Perfect for hobbyists, makers, artists, and gamers, Making Things See shows you how to build every project with inexpensive off-the-shelf components, including the open source Processing programming language and the Arduino microcontroller. You’ll learn basic skills that will enable you to pursue your own creative applications with Kinect.

  • Create Kinect applications on Mac OS X, Windows, or Linux
  • Track people with pose detection and skeletonization, and use blob tracking to detect objects
  • Analyze and manipulate point clouds
  • Make models for design and fabrication, using 3D scanning technology
  • Use MakerBot, RepRap, or Shapeways to print 3D objects
  • Delve into motion tracking for animation and games
  • Build a simple robot arm that can imitate your arm movements
  • Discover how skilled artists have used Kinect to build fascinating projects

List Price: $ 39.99

Price: $ 19.90

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Quip’s mobile-native word processing comes to Android

Quip’s built-for-mobile word processor has at last reached Android. The newly available app mirrors much of what we’ve seen in the iOS version, including adaptive documents, cloud syncing and deep collaboration tools that include messaging and image …

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Processing trick turns off-the-shelf earphones into pulse rate monitors

We’ve seen earphones that double as health sensors, but they frequently require integrated (and sometimes bulky) equipment to get the job done. Bifrostec and the Kaiteki Institute have just solved that problem with processing technology that turns any pair of in-ears into a pulse wave sensor. The …

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Stanford seizes 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

Stanford commandeers 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

In brief order, the Sequoia supercomputer and its 1.57 million processing centers will shift to a life of top-secret analysis at the National Nuclear Protection Administration, but till that day comes, analysts are presently working to ensure its seamless operation. Most lately, a group from Stanford took the helm of Sequoia to run computational fluid dynamics simulations– a process that requires a carefully tuned balance of computation, memory and communication parts– in order to better understand engine sound from supersonic jets. As a motivating sign, the group had the ability to effectively push the CFD simulation beyond 1 million cores, which is a first of its kind and bodes effectively for the scalability of the system. This and various other examinations are presently being performed on Sequoia as part of its “shakeout” period, which allows its caretakers to much better understand the capabilities of the IBM BlueGene/Q computer. Should all go well, Sequoia is arranged to begin a life of government work in March. In the meantime, you’ll discover a couple views of the setup after the break.

Stanford scientists commandeer 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

Stanford scientists commandeer 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

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, EurekAlertSource: Stanford

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Dropcam Now Processing More Uploaded Video Than YouTube Says CEO Greg Duffy

We rested with Greg Duffy, CEO of Dropcam, to discuss his company ’ s move into on-line DVR services connected with their cool little HD webcams. The huge news? Dropcam cameras now upload more video per day than YouTube.

Duffy kept in mind that the business is working to more smart material noticing so their cameras and online DVR service will be able to select out faces and figures in the scene and be a bit more smart with notifications and movement sensing.

There wasn ’ t any new Dropcam hardware to mention this CES however the service is certainly more interesting these days merely due to the fact that a cloud-backed DVR could be a lifesaver for businesses and personal users alike.

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Atari 2600s get PC innards, 22,857 times more processing power

Atari 2600s get PC innards, 22,857 times more processing power

Atari games redesigned in HTML 5 may bring back a flood of nostalgia, but they leave out a key part of the gaming experience: the classic hardware. Hard Drives Northwest filled that void by gutting a limited number of authentic Atari 2600s and stuffing them with modern PC components. Packing a Core i7 3.4GHz processor, the retro console now boasts 22,857 times more processing power than it did in its heyday, according to Microsoft’s calculations — more than enough oomph to handle the recent remakes. Other internals include 8GB of RAM, a 120GB SSD and a Radeon HD 6570 graphics card with 1GB of video memory. With support for USB 3.0 and 2.0, eSATA, DisplayPort, DVI and HDMI, the system is well stocked on the connectivity front. Finally, the signature of Atari founder Nolan Bushnell acts as the cherry atop the faux wood grain-toting package. While the souped-up machines aren’t up for sale, a pair of them are slated for a giveaway. Glamour shots and the full set of specs await you at the source.

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Atari 2600s get PC innards, 22,857 times more processing power originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 13 Sep 2012 18:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Ask Engadget: is iPod Touch and Wireless Printer-based credit card processing possible?

Ask Engadget

We know you’ve got questions, and if you’re brave enough to ask the world for answers, here’s the outlet to do so. This week’s Ask Engadget inquiry is coming to us from Dustin, who wants to turn the humble iPod Touch into a cash register for live events. If you’re looking to send in an inquiry of your own, drop us a line at ask [at] engadget [dawt] com.

“We currently have 10 credit card terminals we purchased three years ago, and we’re looking to replace them thanks to their horrific failure rate and replacement cost. We only use them for special events, but they account for $ 24 million of our credit card revenue. Ideally I’d like to replace them with iPod touches and a wireless printer, but I can’t seem to find a solution that offers printing — but it’s essential to what we do. Thanks for your help!”

We found that Square lets you connect to a Star Micronics receipt printer, and Intuit GoPayment accepts Bluetooth-enabled P25 Blue Bamboo printers — so those could work for you. Of course, Ask Engadget is about sourcing the opinion of our hive-mind, so if your business has already conquered this problem, why not share what you know?

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Ask Engadget: is iPod Touch and Wireless Printer-based credit card processing possible? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 01 Sep 2012 23:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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I have this CMU cam2+ robotics project that requires image processing, where do i start from??

Question by Divz: I have this CMU cam2+ robotics project that requires image processing, where do i start from??
I think i am pretty much clear with the idea that the cam actually tracks a ball. I would like to know if there is anyone who has already worked on the same and has experience with the image processing part of the project. For example, what color model is better if the cam is used? After the entire robot is set up how do we actually get the data from the robot?

Best answer:

Answer by Snoopy’s Best Friend
You asked a lot of questions here.

In my experience, the best color to use with the CMU cam (speaking from experience with the original CMU cam) is in the red spectrum — red, light red, orange, etc.

The camera has various modes that you can extract data from it. One mode will tell you how much of a color is visible to it at that point in time. You can also extract where the bulk of each color is in relation to the camera frame. That is how you can tell if something is moving, where a certain color object mass is in relation to the camera frame, etc. The camera sees in two dimensions so it can’t tell you how far away something is, but it can give you x-y coordinates in relation to the frame avaialble to it at that time.

If you go to various robotic sites, there are samples of these programs. I am assuming you have already been to the CMU website as well.

I am not quite clear on what you are asking in your last question.

Good luck.

Add your own answer in the comments!

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Audience earSmart eS110 brings its voice processing and noise suppression to low cost feature phones

Remember Audience? Sure you do. The outfit was behind the iPhone 4’s noise-canceling wizardry that would be later built directly into the 4S’ A5 heart. Now, the company has announced its earSmart eS110 advanced voice processor for feature phones. Touting “the same voice quality” as those more expensive phones that we all covet, the single microphone tech will suppress unwanted noise like cars passing by or that loud guy next to you at a bar. The eS110 offers crisp calls for both handset and speakerphone uses thanks to processors designed around how humans filter the sounds that we hear. Entry-level smartphones are targets as well and the kit’s 3.5 x 3.5mm stature should make for easy integration. Audience says that samples will be sent out to manufacturers in March and should show up in handsets by the end of the year. In search of a few more details? Hit the full PR below to find out more.

Continue reading Audience earSmart eS110 brings its voice processing and noise suppression to low cost feature phones

Audience earSmart eS110 brings its voice processing and noise suppression to low cost feature phones originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 28 Feb 2012 16:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Name at least three jobs that have been influenced by such technological advances as robotics, word processing?

Question by choicie2k2001: Name at least three jobs that have been influenced by such technological advances as robotics, word processing?
Name at least three jobs that have been influenced by such technological advances as robotics, word processing?
Name at least three jobs that have been influenced by such technological advances as robotics, word processing software, fax machines, and electronic mail. Describe the jobs prior to the technological advances and explain how these jobs have changed or will change because of the technological advances. For each job, list the new skills that you feel are relevant for pay-for-knowledge pay programs.

Best answer:

Answer by Brad T
Okay, seriously no one wants to do your homework for you. Part of learning means putting in the work. Here are some tips though. For industries I’d start with the Auto Industry as far as robotics, and software (someone needs to make the robots do stuff and they can’t do that without someone writing the program to make it move) I’d also look into Sales jobs. A lot of sales jobs use e-mail and fax machines to communicate between states. Not all companies are consolidated in one spot. Example: I worked at a bank in a call canter and we would have to contact insurance companies in different states or we had to create a report of someones identity getting stolen and send it to the Identity Theft department located in a different state or city. So there is a pretty good jumping off point. Seriously do the work and don’t expect free answers, You have the internet and it’s a great tool, but asking for free answers is lame. Be happy you have the internet. Actually you might even use that as another industry, being a student is a job, am I right? You have the internet where it wasn’t always available back in the day.

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