Posts Tagged ‘policy’

Famed Chinese director admits to violating one-child policy

Acclaimed movie director Zhang Yimou has admitted to violating China’s one-child policy, after authorities launched an investigation into longstanding rumors that he had fathered up to seven children. Zhang, director of the films Hero, House of Flying Daggers, and The Flowers of War, admitted to violating the rule in a Sina Weibo post published on Sunday, saying he fathered three children with his wife, Chen Ting. As the BBC reports, the director apologized for the violation, though he denied claims that he fathered more children with his wife and other women.

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Dutch regulator says Google’s privacy policy breaks the law

Almost two years after it updated its privacy policy, Google is still facing the wrath of European watchdogs. The Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA) has just ended a seven-month investigation into the search giant’s practices and, similar to rulings in the UK and France, has deduced that Google isn’t doing enough to inform users about the data it “collects and combines.” The DPA accuses Google of spinning an “invisible web of our personal data without our consent” with its Search, Gmail and YouTube services, which it states in no uncertain terms “is forbidden by law.” It’s another knock for Google, which has found itself under investigation by a total of six European privacy authorities after French privacy regulator CNIL initiated action on their behalf last year. Google has said that it “respects European law,” but its commitment will be tested at the Dutch DPA’s upcoming hearing, after which the authority will decide it wants to take “enforcement measures” against the company.

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Via: Techie News

Source: Dutch DPA

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Dutch regulator says Google’s privacy policy breaks the law

Almost two years after it updated its privacy policy, Google is still facing the wrath of European watchdogs. The Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA) has just ended a seven-month investigation into the search giant’s practices and, similar to rulings in the UK and France, has deduced that Google isn’t doing enough to inform users about the data it “collects and combines.” The DPA accuses Google of spinning an “invisible web of our personal data without our consent” with its Search, Gmail and YouTube services, which it states in no uncertain terms “is forbidden by law.” It’s another knock for Google, which has found itself under investigation by a total of six European privacy authorities after French privacy regulator CNIL initiated action on their behalf last year. Google has said that it “respects European law,” but its commitment will be tested at the Dutch DPA’s upcoming hearing, after which the authority will decide it wants to take “enforcement measures” against the company.

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Via: Techie News

Source: Dutch DPA

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Daily Roundup: BlackBerry Z30 review, Steam Controller hands-on, Google’s new policy turns you into an ad and more!

You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours — all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on …

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UK and Germany join France in demanding Google rewrite its privacy policy

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Last month France acted on a year-long investigation into Google’s new privacy policy in the EU, demanding the company change its policy or face stiff fines. Now, the UK and Germany are piling on. The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office says that Google’s policy, last updated in March 2012, “does not provide sufficient information to enable UK users of Google’s services to understand how their data will be used across all of the company’s products.” The ICO is giving Google until September 20th to update the policy or face “the possibility of formal enforcement action.”

Germany, meanwhile, has already scheduled a hearing for August, where Google will need to defend its privacy policy, reports Computerworld. Google’s privacy…

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UK and Germany join France in demanding Google rewrite its privacy policy

Google-logo-stock-11_2040_large

Last month France acted on a year-long investigation into Google’s new privacy policy in the EU, demanding the company change its policy or face stiff fines. Now, the UK and Germany are piling on. The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office says that Google’s policy, last updated in March 2012, “does not provide sufficient information to enable UK users of Google’s services to understand how their data will be used across all of the company’s products.” The ICO is giving Google until September 20th to update the policy or face “the possibility of formal enforcement action.”

Germany, meanwhile, has already scheduled a hearing for August, where Google will need to defend its privacy policy, reports Computerworld. Google’s privacy…

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How China’s one-child policy created a generation obsessed with nostalgia

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There’s a surge of nostalgia amongst a certain segment of the Chinese population, and as Amanda R. Martinez writes in the New Yorker, it might just have to do with loneliness. The craving for all things nostalgic is currently prevalent amongst those born between 1980 and 1989 — the first generation born after China’s one-child policy — and they’re indulging in everything from Transformers to classroom-themed restaurants. “They came of age in tandem with China’s transition to a more market-based economy,” writes Martinez, “a fateful stroke of timing through which they were enlisted as involuntary trailblazers, tasked with defining what it means to be both modern and Chinese.” Be sure to check out the essay in its entirety at the New…

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Best Buy to make online price-matching policy permanent

Best Buy to make online price-matching policy permanent

Finest Buy began matching rates of on-line retailers in time for the holidays last year, and now it’s set to make the practice long-lasting in an effort to heal its display room disorder and turn window-shopping site visitors into paying customers. Come March 3rd, the policy will enter impact for the outfit’s website, normal brick and mortar places, Best Buy mobile stores as well as phone orders. Officially dubbed the Low Rate Guarantee, the plan will fulfill costs for all regional competitors and a total of 19 online stores, consisting of the likes of Amazon, Apple, Staples, NewEgg and Target. Additionally, the pricing plan has actually been broadened to extra products, but it still doesn’t cover on-contract smartphones and other items. While customers may end up conserving some coin with the brand-new deal, they’ll see the item return duration drop from 30 days to 15. By the appearances of it, company founder Richard Schulze may be getting his means with strategies to save his struggling production.

[ Image credit: Daniel Oines, Flickr ]

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Rogers adopts sane device unlocking policy, $8 pay-per-use US roaming

Rogers adopts sane device unlocking policy, $  8 payperuse US roaming

Rogers has had an unlocking policy in place for awhile, but it isn’t what most would call reasonable: an unlock isn’t even an option until the contract is over, which could involve a 3-year wait and obsolete hardware that isn’t worth the effort. Logic is about to prevail, thanks in part to pressure from proposed CRTC guidelines on customer rights. A policy change in March will see Rogers unlock devices as long as they’ve been on the network for at least 90 days, delivering freedom while the equipment is still relevant. Subscribers will just have to swallow the $ 50 fee, although that’s a relative bargain next to buying outright.

The provider is also making a gesture of goodwill to those who frequently cross into the US through a new roaming add-on launching this spring. Border-hoppers will have the option to pay $ 8 to get a quick, 50MB hit of data for one day. It’s not quite the revolution the carrier claims when many of us could blow past the limit within minutes — Instagram, anyone? Still, it’s good enough for emergency directions or an email check among those of us who won’t commit to a permanent roaming plan.

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Source: Rogers

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CBS reportedly refuses to budge on no-reviews policy, sending morale at CNET ‘plummeting’

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Prior to an all-hands conference with CBS business on Wednesday, CNET staffers supposedly thought that their parent company may reverse its policy banning evaluations of the Hopper DVR and Aereo. Instead, as Jim Romenesko reports, CBS was stubborn. Not just might CNET’s testimonials group not cover the Hopper DVR, reporters apparently can not compose positively of the product at all.

This account appeared in media reporter Jim Romenesko’s blog site, supported by meetings of multiple CNET staffers. It suggests that CNET and its parent company are still at probabilities over what constitutes editorial disturbance. Troubles that appear minor to CBS are major for CNET. It provides no resolution of the bothersome distinction in between information and reviews that CBS is …

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