Posts Tagged ‘pipes’

TIG Welding Robots Use Coordinated Motion to Weld Pipes – FANUC America

Robotic TIG Welding: http://www.fanucrobotics.com/Products/Robots/welding-robots.aspx FANUC America continues to provide manufacturers with the latest innova…

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European Commission clears 2GHz bands for LTE use by 2014, claims 4G pipes wider than the US

European Union flags

European LTE implementations might simply be getting started, however the European Commission is currently trying to head off any sort of bandwidth problems at the pass. The company has actually bought that 120MHz of typically 3G-only spectrum around the 2GHz band needs to be reusable for LTE and other 4G networks by June 30th, 2014. Once the airwaves loosen up, the Commission sees its home continent having an advantage over an LTE-happy US: it expects to have as much as 1GHz of spectrum readily available for 4G, or possibly two times as much as exactly what Americans may claim. Officials are also mulling plans to repurpose additional slices of 2GHz spectrum that have not even been used for 3G and could possibly provide that much even more headroom. While an edge over the United States in bandwidth might not last after policy changes, it’s hard to complain if the EC step causes future smartphones whose downloads stay rapid.

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clears 2GHz bands for LTE use by 2014, claims 4G pipelines wider than the United States originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 05 Nov 2012 13:02:00 EDT . Please see our terms for usage of feeds. Permalink GigaOM | European Commission|Email this|Comments

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Plex 1.1 for iOS improves streaming over 3G, pipes video to your TV

If you’re not already running the Plex Media Server on one of the twenty-three beige boxes networked across your tiny domicile, you may be sorely tempted to install a copy this week, because the iOS app has just received a truly massive update. Where once the XBMC spinoff would have to transcode every video it delivered to your device across the ether, Plex claims it can now either bypass that CPU-intensive process or use an iOS-optimized technique, pumping H.264 video over the air far more efficiently. Second, it can deliver that content from iOS direct to your TV, via either a video-out cable or experimental support for AirPlay. Not bad, right? How’s universal search sound — the ability to type in a word and have the app reach out to local servers, remote servers, and online video services like YouTube and Vimeo too? Yeah, that $ 4.99 price tag is looking mighty affordable right about now, and there are plenty more improvements to peruse at the links below.

Plex 1.1 for iOS improves streaming over 3G, pipes video to your TV originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 10 Apr 2011 06:03:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink 9to5 Mac, MacStories  |  sourcePlex (iTunes)  | Email this | Comments

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New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

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NEW YORK CITY — The system of pneumatic trash-sucking tubes running beneath the surface of New York City’s Roosevelt Island is either a quirky relic or a glimpse of the future, depending on how you look at it.

A network of 20-inch tubes takes garbage from the island’s 16 residential towers, collecting from every floor, to a central collection point where it is compacted and trucked off the island. It is at once a simple and elegant solution to gathering trash, and an aging and complicated beast that needs a lot of upkeep.

“I can’t run the system right now, I got guys in the pipe. It would kill them,” said sanitation engineer Jerry Sorgente. “We have contractors here from Sweden. They crawl through the pipes, find holes and repair them.”

Wired.com recently toured Roosevelt Island’s trash-sucking system, and followed the path of the trash from start to finish, even catching the Swedes in action along the way.

Image: Jonathan Snyder/Wired.com

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New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

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New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

<< previous image | next image >>










NEW YORK CITY — The system of pneumatic trash-sucking tubes running beneath the surface of New York City’s Roosevelt Island is either a quirky relic or a glimpse of the future, depending on how you look at it.

A network of 20-inch tubes takes garbage from the island’s 16 residential towers, collecting from every floor, to a central collection point where it is compacted and trucked off the island. It is at once a simple and elegant solution to gathering trash, and an aging and complicated beast that needs a lot of upkeep.

“I can’t run the system right now, I got guys in the pipe. It would kill them,” said sanitation engineer Jerry Sorgente. “We have contractors here from Sweden. They crawl through the pipes, find holes and repair them.”

Wired.com recently toured Roosevelt Island’s trash-sucking system, and followed the path of the trash from start to finish, even catching the Swedes in action along the way.

Image: Jonathan Snyder/Wired.com

See the article here:
New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

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New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

<< previous image | next image >>










NEW YORK CITY — The system of pneumatic trash-sucking tubes running beneath the surface of New York City’s Roosevelt Island is either a quirky relic or a glimpse of the future, depending on how you look at it.

A network of 20-inch tubes takes garbage from the island’s 16 residential towers, collecting from every floor, to a central collection point where it is compacted and trucked off the island. It is at once a simple and elegant solution to gathering trash, and an aging and complicated beast that needs a lot of upkeep.

“I can’t run the system right now, I got guys in the pipe. It would kill them,” said sanitation engineer Jerry Sorgente. “We have contractors here from Sweden. They crawl through the pipes, find holes and repair them.”

Wired.com recently toured Roosevelt Island’s trash-sucking system, and followed the path of the trash from start to finish, even catching the Swedes in action along the way.

Image: Jonathan Snyder/Wired.com

See the article here:
New York City’s Trash-Sucking Island

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PVC-Pipe Speakers for Space Age Bachelor Pad Music

If Stanley Kubrick had decided to make the plumbing in 2001’s Discovery One spaceship visible, it would have looked like this. These gorgeous speakers are hand-built by Etsy seller Ikymagoo, and are little more than cleverly-joined sections of PVC-pipe with a pair of speakers shoved in the ends.

The Ikyaudio Sea Cucumbers Audio Speakers use three-inch magnesium/aluminum alloy drivers in the ends, and the tail of the caterpillar-like curls has a hole in the end which acts as a bass-port. The amp is connected via binding posts (and you’ll need an amp – these speakers are unpowered) and Ikymagoo says they have a “nice sound and a very good sound stage, lots of low end bass for a small speaker.”

The Lady pegged them as Japanese in styling right away, and suggested I clear out the living-room and put in some tatami-mats, a couple cushions and these speakers. I would have to pay for this, of course, and the Ikyaudios are a rather steep $200 a pair, so I’d probably make my own.

Lucky for me, Ikymagoo has posted an extensive how-to on his speaker constructions At DIY Audio Projects, complete with a video of the prototypes in action. It actually looks pretty easy, but if you would rather get a pair of these instead, they also come in red and yellow.

Ikyaudio White Sea Cucumbers Audio Speakers [Etsy via Make]

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PVC-Pipe Speakers for Space Age Bachelor Pad Music

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Flush it Real Good: HighDro Power Turns Waste Water into Electricity

When you pull the chain on your cistern, you are literally flushing energy down the toilet. Tom Broadbent’s HighDro Power takes that energy and turns it into electricity.

Broadbent is a graduate of the De Montfort University in Leicester (that’s pronounced “lester”) in England. His device uses the energy of the waste water as it falls through the pipes, just like a hydroelectric dam, only smaller and not flooding valleys and forcing people to move out.

The HighDro Power isn’t meant for the home. Rather, it would be inserted into the plumbing of commercial buildings, taking the fast moving water from long soil pipes and converting them to energy via four blades which turn a turbine. By Broadbent’s reckoning, the device would save $1,400 in electricity costs per year in a seven-story building.

The neat part is that the box is made from off-the-shelf parts along with sections that Broadbent put together in a fab-lab using lasers, CNC-milling and vacuum forming machines. In larger production, then, it should be cheap enough to pay for itself very quickly, and in places like hotels, with their endlessly-emptying baths and showers, it could even turn into a money-maker as the energy is sold back to the grid.

Waste Not Want Not with DMU Student’s Electric Idea [Creative Boom via Core77]

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Flush it Real Good: HighDro Power Turns Waste Water into Electricity

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brite-View LinkE pipes content to four Ethernet sources over existing powerline network

The market is darn near flooded with HomePlug AV-compatible powerline solutions, but Zinnet has seen fit to one-up the networking mainstays by dishing out a product that serves not one, but four Ethernet-packin’ devices simultaneously. Designed for use with its brite-View CinemaTube (but fully capable of working with game consoles, Blu-ray players and media streamers), this two-piece kit allows internet content to flow through your home’s existing powerline network and hit up to four devices on the other end. Simply plug the solo port adapter into a wall socket beside your router or broadband modem, and the four port adapter in your home theater room (or den, for the simplistic among us). From there, you can connect your Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Roku set-top-box, Blu-ray player, CinemaTube deck or any other AV device that benefits from a wired internet connection; just like that, you’ve got a makeshift connection to four devices, and you’ll never have to worry over WiFi dropouts again. All that’s required to bring this joy into your life is $89.99 and a basic understanding of online checkout procedure, both of which we’re sure you can handle.

brite-View LinkE pipes content to four Ethernet sources over existing powerline network originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 09 Mar 2010 17:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourcePR Newswire  | Email this | Comments

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