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Posts Tagged ‘pedal’

3Doodler Launches New Accessories Including A Much-Needed, Anti-Burninating Foot Pedal

ifa-3doodler1 In todays small, hand-held 3D printer news, we learn that 3Doodler (think of a hot glue gun with a lot more usability) has released a few new accessories including a foot pedal that allows you to extrude filament without having to press the button on the device. I played with the 3Doodler a few months ago and was duly impressed. In the right hands – and with the right degree of… Read More

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Backed Or Whacked: Pedal Pushers Wheel And Offer

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Editor’s note: Ross Rubin is principal analyst at Reticle Research and blog sites at Techspressive. Each column will consider crowdfunded products that have either met or missed their financing goals. Follow him on Twitter @rossrubin. Bikes and tech return a long method. Throughout his initial stint at Apple, Steve Jobs would talk about how, when one compared the efficiency of different mammals ahead of time a kilometer, people fared improperly, a remote

types from the class-leading condor. However when you did the exact same comparison with a human on a bicycle, people blew away the pack. The idea of computer systems as a “bicycle for the mind” was a style he would repeat, and “Bike” were floated as a name for the Macintosh. Jobs, naturally, was not the only adult enamored by bicycles; the two-wheeled wonders are treasured by a significant community of enthusiasts mature for the pedal peddlers at Kickstarter. Whether your New Year’s resolution was to tone up under the property of “two wheels good, four wheels bad” or are aiming to match your tourist attraction to being ecologically green with limited-edition Kickstarter green, a number of current projects have offered brand-new handles urban mobility. Backed: Bicymple. Capable of riding in a straight line with its rear wheel parallel along with ultra-tight turning radii, the compact and nearly symmetrical Bicymple is identified by the absence of a chain and the positioning of pedals on the rear wheel. Nevertheless, Bellingham, MA-based designer Josh Bechtel advises that it’s not a “two-wheeled unicycle,” pointing out the trip as

very various (and hopefully more beneficial to the balance-challenged) and neglecting that such a thing would be an oxymoron. Reward tiers to baga Bicymple of one’s very own array from $ 800 for the fixed-gear model around $ 2,700 for a two-gear model, which could be as numerous as you could get away with while attempting to worry simpleness. Regardless of the expensive product, the project beat its $ 20,000 financing objective by majority with about 40 days delegated enter the project. In a rare and welcome move, Bechtel has set the delivery date at December 2013 but notes that he’s providing himself space to wiggle as much as the Bicymple’s wheel and anticipates to fulfill orders well prior to that. Whacked: NexiBike. It could appear like a strong declaration to state that your innovation will be “a game changer that will reinvent human-powered transportation.” That declaration, however, originates from Scott Olson, who, with his brother, established the Rollerblades that Olson additionally declares transformed human-powered transportation. It may not have done that,

but it did reinvent the roller skate. Olson’s latest pursuit, a 25-lb. foldable bike that you could hold with you onto mass transit, looks a bit like a steampunk task folded up.

Unfolded , it’s characterized by its small wheels and the appearing promo of a comfortable, un-hunched riding posture. More transportable however less appealing than the Bicymple, the NexiBike needed $ 100,000 for its manufacturing. And while the bike’s puncture-proof tires may stand up to flattening out, the project could possibly not. With about 17 days to go, it has actually gathered less than $ 3,000. Whacked: Zuumer. The NexiBike transformation may need to wait, however at

least two folding bike projects did make their funding objectives in years past: the Brooklyn-born CMYK Folding Electric Bike and exactly what would come to be the Model Ue curve-framed electric bike (now slated for delivery this year). There’s likewise been at least one electric scooter, the smooth however whacked JAC (from the Netherlands. The Zuumer (not to be puzzled with the Honda Scooter or Palm-developed PDA sold by Casio and Tandy Corp. in 1994) includes a 2nd rear wheel to the electric scooter, and “lean-in” steering that allows 300 lbs. of flesh and cargo to travel

up to 20 mph beforebeing recharged. Most of the 23 early-bird Zuumers, priced at $ 2,300 each, are still left, with the next reward tier leaping $ 500 for the exact same thing. However one may have to wait a while to learn who’s zooming whom . With 20 days left, Zuumcraft has actually attracted only about $ 17,000.

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EcoXPower charges a smartphone, bike headlight and tail light with pedal power

EcoXPower charges a smartphone, bicycle headlight and tail light with pedal power

Bicycle rigs for charging cellphones have lit up our radar before, but now the EcoXPower is being billed as the first device of its kind that can simultaneously juice up LED lights and a smartphone with the power of your pedaling. Packing a headlamp, a red tail light and a lithium-ion rechargeable battery, the contraption attaches to a bike’s front wheel hub with the help of a universal mount. When clamped on, the apparatus’ clutch engages between the velocipede’s spokes so it can generate electricity. A USB adapter cable runs up the two-wheeler’s fork to a water-resistant, touchscreen-friendly case that can house iPhones, Android handsets and “all major GPS devices” perched atop the handlebars. Cyclists yearning to charge their electronics with the dynamo can pick one up for $ 99.99. Roll past the break for the full press release.

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EcoXPower charges a smartphone, bicycle headlight and tail light with pedal power originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 23 Aug 2012 01:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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ARM server running on pedal power demoed at Red Hat Summit

ARM server running on pedal power demoed at Red Hat Summit

With x86 and a couple of high-powered RISC chips dominating the listing of the most powerful computer systems on Earth, you may be pondering what’s the large package with ARM and it’s push into the server space. Well, this is the huge offer. The image above is of Jon Masters powering a Calxeda-server from HP with nothing greater than a bike. OK, so there’s a bit more to the setup– consisting of a 400 watt inverter, a 35 Ah battery, a UPS and a Pedal-a-Watt– but the gist of it is that Masters was able keep 32 ARM primaries humming along simply by pedaling his road bike at the Red Hat Summit. The demo was primarily meant as a proof of principle, however we can quickly imagine our future robotic overlords putting us to work keeping their network of servers running. On the plus side, pedaling to power the Web could help fix our worldwide weight problems epidemic. For a quick excursion of the tackle, have a look at the online video after the break.

Continue reading ARM server operating on pedal power demoed at Red Hat SummitARM server

operating on pedal power demoed at Red Hat Summit originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 02 Jul 2012 15:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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3XFX Fatman V2 Fuzz Pedal Demo (On Bass! )

3XFX Fatman V2 Fuzz Pedal Demo (On Bass! )

www.ToneFactor.com – As it’s name implies, the Fatman/V2 has a very big sound! It offers a huge variety of distorions ranging from warm tube sounds, bluesy overdrive, ballsy distortion, and insane oscillating fuzz; this pedal is extremely versatile. In Fatman mode this pedal just plain rocks, the gain knob allows for a very wide range of distorion to cover every playing style! It offers enough clean boost to make it a great pre-amp and drive your amp to really make it purr. When in the V2 oscillating fuzz mode, this pedal offers insane leads. You can switch between having a pre-set oscillator tone, controlled by a knob, or you can vary the oscillator frequency in real time by placing your foot over the built-in light control, giving an organic wah-distortion like effect. In oscillator mode this pedal can also give you very robotic sounding synthetic guitar tones, and even Nintendo-like video game sounds! Please note that when I refer to an oscillating fuzz, I mean it really oscillates. When you are not playing you will hear a tone generated by the pedal. In oscillating mode if you hit a note and let it fade out, you will first hear the oscillator sound interact with your insturment for a ring modulator like sound, then the oscillator will take over as the instrument continues to fade out. Features include: true-bypass footswitching, Switchcraft jacks, heavy duty enclosure, dual color LED indicator, 9V AC adapter jack, low noise high quality parts, and very tough scratch
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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High gain distortion overdrive true bypass pedal KAMIKAZE Dedalo Handmade Effects

Check out the new version at: www.youtube.com This is the official demo of our distortion and overdrive pedal KAMIKAZE. With its creamy overdrive and hi gain distortion, KAM-2 delivers all the gain you may need, divided in two different dynamic ranges. Perfect for those high voltage leads and crunchy rythmics. – Two-stages FET saturation. – One stage symetric LED saturation. – Distortion and Overdrive modes. – True Bypass – Handmade CONTROLS Cuerpo (body): amount of low frequencies injected into the saturation stages, controls the tone of the generated distortion. At the max position, the sound is heavy and fat, while at min the mid frequencies are boosted and intermodulation lowered. This control varies its effect according to the bass content of the instrument, and the Gain control. Ganancia (gain): amount of applied amplification, which translates to distortion. Agudos (treble): treble-cut filter of 6db/octave. Over/Dist : selects the mode of operation: – Overdrive: the gain is moderate, with a high and soft saturation threshold. Most of the distortion is provided by the FET, giving an organic and creamy sound, very sensitive to picking dynamics. – Distorsion (Distortion) : masive gain applied, with a lower and harder saturation threshold. Added to the FET is the symetric distortion of LEDs, generating a sound that crunches with harmonics and sustain while retaining definition. Volumen (level): general level of the pedal. Recording setup: Gibson SG – Maquina del Tiempo
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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MXR Micro Flanger Reissue Pedal Demo

MXR Micro Flanger Reissue Pedal Demo

www.ToneFactor.com – Based on the benchmark sounds of the MXR M117 Flanger, the MXR Micro Flanger guitar pedal features many of the same flanging effects of its big brother, but in a smaller and more convenient size. Originally released in the ’80s, this faithful recreation features the same 2 critical controls—a Speed knob to control the rate of cycling, and a Regeneration knob to manage the overall intensity—and stays true to its 100% analog bucket brigade technology for the ultimate in warm and organic tone. The MXR Micro Flanger pedal has been updated with a true bypass switch so you don’t lose any tone during bypass. Go from jet plane like sweeps to cool outer space type effects with the MXR Micro Flanger guitar effect pedal. The MXR Micro Flanger pedal can be powered by one 9V battery (accessed by removing the effect pedal’s bottom plate), a Dunlop DC810DC brick, or MC403 Power system (sold separately). Features: True bypass with LED Rate knob Regeneration knob Footswitch for on/bypass All-analog circuitry with bucket brigade technology for warm analog tone

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Sanyo Eneloop Pedal Juice battery pack preview

It’s Christmas Day, which probably means that at least one toy that you received (or gave) won’t be fully functional until Monday. Why? Batteries. It’s an age-old problem, that “batteries not included” thing, and it’s one of the reasons we’ve fell so in love with Sanyo’s Eneloop line. Without question, the Eneloop rechargeable AA batteries are amongst the best and most reliable that money can buy, so whenever another Eneloop product pops out, it obviously catches our eye. Sanyo’s branching out pretty severely with its latest device, and being that at least 3.5 members of the Engadget staff have strummed a six-string once or twice, we had to take a closer look at the Pedal Juice when given the chance. For those that missed last month’s introduction, this pedal-sized block of energy is designed to provide 9V power to six or seven effects pedals, miniature amplifiers or electric drum pads (amongst other musical doodads). So, does this thing live up the the Eneloop reputation? Find out after the break.

Gallery: Sanyo Eneloop Pedal Juice unboxing and hands-on

Continue reading Sanyo Eneloop Pedal Juice battery pack preview

Sanyo Eneloop Pedal Juice battery pack preview originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 25 Dec 2010 22:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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For Guitarists: Sanyo’s Pedal Juice Battery Pack

Sanyo keeps on adding products to its eneloop brand of eco-friendly, rechargeable batteries. Today the company announced the so-called KBC-9V3U Pedal Juice for the US and other markets, a 9V lithium-ion battery unit designed for charging multiple guitar effects pedals at the same time (it features two 9V outputs and can power multi-effect units and portable recorders, too).

Sanyo says that a full charge of the Pedal Juice takes approximately 3.5 hours. The device then offers up to 50 hours of power for a 10mA effects pedal, or up to 27 hours for a 100mA pedal board. According to Sanyo, the Pedal Juice is resistant to water (alcohol) and shocks and provides cleaner, more stable and quiet power when compared to conventional 9V batteries.

Sized at 65x42x120mm and weighing just 280g, it’s pretty compact, too.

In the US, the Pedal Juice is already available (for example on Amazon) for $ 150 (the MSRP seems to be $ 199.99).



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Sanyo Pedal Juice battery pack powers your wah-wah without distortion

Sanyo Pedal Juice battery pack powers your wah-wah without distortion

A good roadie can be identified by two things: a wardrobe composed entirely of darks and bulging pockets full of batteries. Sanyo would like to let those tireless workers downsize to some slimmer black jeans with its new Pedal Juice battery pack, which is rocking a little Eneloop technology inside and can power a whole slew of daisy-chained devices. Charge it up for 3.5 hours and it’ll provide 9V DC of output to whatever you like, powering a 10mA effects pedal for a whopping 50 hours. That’s about 10 times longer than a simple 9V battery and, unlike one of those, the Pedal Juice will provide a constant 9V right up until it’s dead. It even promises less electrical interference than using an AC adapter. All that for $ 149.99, which may sound like a lot for a battery pack, and it is, but real musicians know that success doesn’t come cheap.

Gallery: Sanyo Pedal Power

Sanyo Pedal Juice battery pack powers your wah-wah without distortion originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 30 Nov 2010 22:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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