Posts Tagged ‘mimics’

Watch this: Kinect-powered motion capture mimics your facial movements in real time

Faceshift motion capture

Faceshift is a new motion capture utility that does an impressive job of replicating facial movements with barely any noticeable delay. The technology relies on Microsoft’s ever-capable Kinect camera to pull in the 3D data it needs to mirror your expressions, though Faceshift’s creators have done an admirable job refining the device’s face recognition capabilities. Seeing even the most slight movements replicated by an on-screen avatar brings to mind the top-notch motion capture we’ve seen in the video game industry in recent years, led most notably by LA Noire.

And gaming is an area where Faceshift could present new opportunities to developers. An SDK targeted at animators and game creators has been released, though it wouldn’t…

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ASIMO mimics your every move, edges closer towards Single White Robot territory (video)

Hey, look Engadgeteers! It’s another Kinect hack — except this one uses a real deal robot. Honda ushered ASIMO out to the crowds at IEEE’s 2011 International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems to show off its newly acquired pop and lock skills. Alright, so the silicon-gutted fella can’t krump with the best of’em yet, but he can probably do the locomotion — it all depends on your dance repertoire. After toiling away in their mad scientist lairs, the researchers behind the bot have managed to devise a means of mimicking human movement that translates mapped points on a user’s upper body into real-time, robot-replicated motion. The devious among you are likely imagining left-of-center uses for the tech, but let us deflate that mischievous balloon; there’ll be no instances of “stop hitting yourself ASIMO” here, as engineers have built-in collision and stability safeguards. The so-lifelike-it’s-Uncanny advancements don’t end there either, as ASIMO now also contains a database of text-inspired gestures — giving our future robot friend a means of physically expressing his cold, “I hate you so much right now” robo-tone. Other than finding himself at home in Italy, these innovations are sure to put ASIMO on the other end of our remote-controlled behest. Click on past the break to see this automated mime drop it like it’s hot.

Continue reading ASIMO mimics your every move, edges closer towards Single White Robot territory (video)

ASIMO mimics your every move, edges closer towards Single White Robot territory (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 01 Oct 2011 19:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceIEEE Spectrum  | Email this | Comments

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Superfast Robotic Camera Mimics Human Eye

Researchers led by Professor Heinz Ulbrich at the Institute of Applied Mechanics at the Technical University of Munich are developing superfast camera-orientation systems that can reproduce the movements of the human eye. Read more: spectrum.ieee.org

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Video: Robot Mimics Snail Style For Omnidirectional Movement


Biomimetic robots are nothing new (snakebot, ro-bat, shark-tail wave harvester), but as there is a great variety of animals to mimic, there’s no shortage of interesting takes on the idea. This one, from Chuo University’s Biomechatronics Lab (how I would love to work at a place with a name like that), uses the movement principle favored by the common snail. They call it “galloping,” but I don’t think that’s accurate, as far as the idiom goes.

What they mean when they say galloping is moving the front part of the body up first, establishing traction there, and then using that as an anchor to pull the rest of the body forwards. I suppose that, when you think about it, that’s actually what horses do too. Anyway, this thing moves slowly but very surely, because at every stage in its movement, it has lots of contact with the surface and tons of grip.

This high level of stability and ease of movement means variants of this could be used in factories and hospitals, where safety and stability are a priority, and speed is just something the night crew takes to stay awake. Too much?

[via IEEE Spectrum and Treehugger]



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Mimics helps you cope with your Sync-less existence (video)

Much as we hate to admit it, we can’t all afford a fancy new car with Sync or Mini Connected inside — I mean, come on, we’re not made of money, people. Thankfully, it seems MP3Car has a pretty slick and affordable solution to the problem of fumbling with your iPhone when you should probably be focusing on the road and not crashing into things. Mimics is an in-car solution that transmits the contents of your handset to a touchscreen display in the vehicle’s dash, letting you listen to music, use GPS, take calls, and check email without having to deal directly with the phone. The system is available now for pre-order at $ 630 for the full version, $ 530 for people who have standard double DIN-sized radio openings in their cars, and $ 205 for hobbyists who want to put the thing together — here’s hoping they’re parked when they do.

[Thanks, Sean]

Continue reading Mimics helps you cope with your Sync-less existence (video)

Mimics helps you cope with your Sync-less existence (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 21 May 2011 23:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceMP3Car  | Email this | Comments

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U of M laser mimics helicopter heat signatures to thwart missiles

Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new laser-based countermeasure for aircraft, and unlike others we’ve seen (and we’ve seen a few) this technology aims to “blind” missiles rather than knock ‘em out of the sky. The system uses a mid-infrared supercontinuum laser to mimic the heat signature of a helicopter, and it has no moving parts — making it rugged enough to last a long time on rotor-based aircraft. The school has even spun off a company, Omni Sciences, to develop the thing, and has received some $1 million in grants from the Army and DARPA to build a second-generation prototype. Of course, questions remain: is it really a wargadget if you can’t blow something up with it? And even if it is, where’s the fun in that?

U of M laser mimics helicopter heat signatures to thwart missiles originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 06 Sep 2010 20:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceGizmag  | Email this | Comments

Props to Engadget

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Hiroshi Ishiguro’s Geminoid-F humanoid mimics Earthlings, is definitely the beginning of the end (video)

Hiroshi Ishiguro (or his evil android twin, one) is back in business, and nearly four years after his Geminoid HI-1 startled youngsters everywhere, the Geminoid-F has arrived to consternate the grown-ups. Shown off this weekend in Osaka, Japan, the lifelike lady you see above (pictured left, just in case you were wondering) was designed to mimic human facial expressions that are fed in to its internal computer. The rubberized face has a rather insane amount of flexibility, enabling it to pull off subtle gestures that have thus far been impossible to replicate on a robot. Sly grins, angry glares and totally-fake smiles are all possible now, with developers hoping to have these in hospitals and the like in the not-too-distant future. Currently, copies of the humanoid are expected to sell for around ¥10,000,000 ($105,780), though it’ll likely be robotics research organizations doing the majority of the buying. Hop on past the break for a video that’s guaranteed to leave you stunned — and while we’re not fluent in Japanese, we’re pretty sure someone asks if they “can rock that bad Larry on their dome.”

Continue reading Hiroshi Ishiguro’s Geminoid-F humanoid mimics Earthlings, is definitely the beginning of the end (video)

Hiroshi Ishiguro’s Geminoid-F humanoid mimics Earthlings, is definitely the beginning of the end (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 05 Apr 2010 00:16:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceAFP  | Email this | Comments

Props to Engadget

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