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Posts Tagged ‘medieval’

3D-printed armor turns Barbie into a medieval badass

When Barbie appeared in Sports Illustrated‘s Swimsuit Issue earlier this year, it ignited newfound controversy over Mattel’s 50-year-plus tradition of using the doll to prop up absurd body image standards. Lost in the debate was the indisputable fact that her typical outfits are entirely inappropriate for storming a castle — but thanks to 3D designer Jim Rodda, that’s been resolved. Rodda has created the “Faire Play Battle Set,” comprising three full sets of 3D-printed battle armor for the iconic figurine. The designer has previously designed a number of 3D-printable items of a medieval persuasion, including functional miniature ballistae and catapults for tabletop gaming.

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A Real Dark Knight: Medieval Batman Scalemail Armor

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This is the set of Dark Knight scalemail armor made by Creations by Christopher. The pre-worn shield was initially produced a webseries called ‘Legends: The Dark Knight‘, however is now searching for a permanently home for the reduced, reduced rate of $ 9,500. Did I just make everybody wish to embrace an animal? Well hopefully just the accountable individuals.

This scalemaille shield is handmade and takes roughly 350 hours to finish. The fit consists of almost 27,000 stainless steel rings, 3,000 small anodized aluminum scales, 4,500 anodized aluminum large scales and has an approximate weight of 60 pounds.

Damn, 60 pounds? I’m uncertain I might stand up because. Lay down and be consumed by a dragon, sure. Come dragon– I am your pure sacrifice, picked by the town senior to ensure a bountiful harvest. “You smell like mead.” SIMPLY EAT ME ALREADY. “Can I see your butt virginity card first?” Hahaha, I, uh … I should have lost it on the trek over below.

Struck the jump for the whole clothing along with a BONUS Harley Quinn chainmail bra and skirt.

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King Richard III’s medieval remains confirmed by DNA tests

richard skeleton

Archaeologists at the College of Leicester announced today that skeletal remains found last year are indeed those of King Richard III. Led by Richard Buckley, the researchers reached their conclusion after conducting substantial DNA examinations over the past year, utilizing samples from the late king’s living descendants as standards. In an interview today, they revealed that DNA screening proves Richard III’s identity “past affordable question.”

The guy continues to be were originally exhumed under a parking great deal near where the king was thought to have actually been buried. The skeleton’s curved spine and fight wounds were consistent with historic accounts of Richard III’s 1485 death, as was the way in which the skeleton was buried.

The …

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Ready My Flying Mount!: Medieval Batman Armor

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From DeviantARTist Azmal (the same leather-worker who brought us the suit of lion armor) comes this Dark KNIGHT inspired getup. I would wear it. I would wear it, and I would charge neighborhood kids $ 1 apiece to throw dirt clumps at me. Then I would take all those dollars and go by myself a bottle of liquor. Then I’d go to the graveyard and cry.

Hit the jump for a couple more including one of the bat paying his respects to his parents (kidding, totally somebody else’s grave) and a link to the artist’s DeviantART with a ton more worthwhile armor (check out the gryphon and dragon helmets).

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Neither Pen Nor Pencil: Write Endlessly In Metal

One of the pleasures of writing in pencil is the friction of two solid materials in contact. One of the delights of writing in pen is that you can write continuously without having to stop to sharpen your stylus. Writing in metal, while expensive, provides some of the benefits of both while exhibiting its own unique beauty.

These two (that’s right, two) different metal pen manufacturers come to us by way of champ design blog Dornob. Both models work on the same principle: a tiny amount of metal alloy transfers from the pen to the page. Unlike pencil, it can’t be smudged with your hand, and unlike ink, it doesn’t need to dry. The amount of alloy for each stroke is so tiny that the pens are expected to last a lifetime without needing to be refilled or replaced. You can sharpen the tips for a finer point with a little sandpaper.

Each company takes a slightly different approach. The Inkless Metal Pen by Vat19 goes with a full stainless-steel barrel. Their marketing department, as you can see from the video above, also has a sharp, playful, dudely sense of humor. (The word “awesome” gets thrown around a lot, and there’s a Scrooge McDuck reference.)

Grand Illusions goes a little more highbrow with their Metal Pens. They have two short versions (including one that can be worn as a keychain) and a Beta Pen which comes with a full-length extension in either black or silver metal or cherry-stained wood.

Grand Illusions also appends a short history on writing in silverpoint: “In the Medieval period, artists and scribes often used a metal stylus in order to draw on a specially prepared paper surface. Generally known as Metalpoint, or Silverpoint when the stylus was made of silver, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer and Rembrandt all used this technique.” My friends, this is music to my early-modern-loving ears. (Luckily, you don’t have to rub your paper with pumice to get these 21st-century pens to make an impression.

The alloy in the Vat19 pen (at least) has trace amounts of lead, so it’s not so good for kids. Both are targeted for designers, lefties (who often have to deal with smearing or smudging ink/graphite as they trace their hand across the page), and geeks who like even their handwriting to be all shiny. (Note: the writing isn’t actually very shiny, more kind of a matte titanium, but you can pretend).

Images via Vat19 and Grand Illusions. Story via Dornob.

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Neither Pen Nor Pencil: Write Endlessly In Metal

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Neither Pen Nor Pencil: Write Endlessly In Metal

One of the pleasures of writing in pencil is the friction of two solid materials in contact. One of the delights of writing in pen is that you can write continuously without having to stop to sharpen your stylus. Writing in metal, while expensive, provides some of the benefits of both while exhibiting its own unique beauty.

These two (that’s right, two) different metal pen manufacturers come to us by way of champ design blog Dornob. Both models work on the same principle: a tiny amount of metal alloy transfers from the pen to the page. Unlike pencil, it can’t be smudged with your hand, and unlike ink, it doesn’t need to dry. The amount of alloy for each stroke is so tiny that the pens are expected to last a lifetime without needing to be refilled or replaced. You can sharpen the tips for a finer point with a little sandpaper.

Each company takes a slightly different approach. The Inkless Metal Pen by Vat19 goes with a full stainless-steel barrel. Their marketing department, as you can see from the video above, also has a sharp, playful, dudely sense of humor. (The word “awesome” gets thrown around a lot, and there’s a Scrooge McDuck reference.)

Grand Illusions goes a little more highbrow with their Metal Pens. They have two short versions (including one that can be worn as a keychain) and a Beta Pen which comes with a full-length extension in either black or silver metal or cherry-stained wood.

Grand Illusions also appends a short history on writing in silverpoint: “In the Medieval period, artists and scribes often used a metal stylus in order to draw on a specially prepared paper surface. Generally known as Metalpoint, or Silverpoint when the stylus was made of silver, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer and Rembrandt all used this technique.” My friends, this is music to my early-modern-loving ears. (Luckily, you don’t have to rub your paper with pumice to get these 21st-century pens to make an impression.

The alloy in the Vat19 pen (at least) has trace amounts of lead, so it’s not so good for kids. Both are targeted for designers, lefties (who often have to deal with smearing or smudging ink/graphite as they trace their hand across the page), and geeks who like even their handwriting to be all shiny. (Note: the writing isn’t actually very shiny, more kind of a matte titanium, but you can pretend).

Images via Vat19 and Grand Illusions. Story via Dornob.

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Neither Pen Nor Pencil: Write Endlessly In Metal

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