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Posts Tagged ‘Measures’

President Obama proposes review, new oversight measures in wake of NSA scandal

President Obama seeks to improve transparency and restore trust following PRISM scandal

Revelations of government surveillance programs, including the headline-grabbing PRISM, have been nothing short of a PR nightmare for the White House. President Obama, who ran in part on a platform that included opposition to certain elements of the Patriot Act and President Bush’s illegal wiretapping program, has faced tough questions about his roll in the NSA data collection system. Today, he addressed reporters in the White House press room and, as part of his regular briefing, began to layout a path to increased transparency that he hopes will re-earn the trust of the citizens.

After consulting with members of congress and civil liberties organizations, President Obama has come up with four initial steps to improve transparency and confidence, while working to maintain essential security apparatus. First up, is a direct dialog with congress about reforming section 215 of the Patriot Act, which is the part of the legislation regarding the collection of telephone records. Obama also took the opportunity to reiterate that the government does not have the ability to eavesdrop on phone calls without a warrant. The second step also involved congress and working to improve confidence in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC). Most notably, he said the government would pursue reforms that would ensure judges would hear opposing views from independent civil liberties proponents, in addition to government representatives.

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South Korea’s FTC finds Google not guilty of antitrust measures

South Korea's FTC finds Google not guilty of antitrust measures

Google has been acquitted of the anti-competitive allegations brought to it more than two years ago by South Korean search operators NHN and Daum Communications, the Yonhap News reported today. Back in April 2011, the two firms accused the Mountain View company of having an unfair advantage by making its own search engine the default on the Android operating system. After a couple of raids and a lengthy review process, the local Fair Trade Commission has finally decided that Google doesn’t hurt NHN’s or Daum’s competitive chances at all. FTC officials said that both companies presently enjoy a healthy chunk of the domestic search engine market — NHN’s portal maintains a good 70 percent share, for example — and that users could easily download NHN and Daum apps onto their phones as alternatives. Chalk this one up as at least one victory in the search giant’s seemingly never-ending battle with authorities.

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Source: Yonhap

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WTFlevel measures humanity’s discontent in real-time by tracking profane tweets

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Twitter is a gushing spigot of fleeting human experiences, varying from depression over pumpkin spice latte blackouts, to life in modern warfare, to the marvelous aphorisms of a horse sage– and there’s lots of profanity amidst all the noise and fury. Luckily, web designer Colin Mitchell has actually produced “WTFlevel:” a straightforward web site that tracks and graphs the quantity of swearing on Twitter in real-time. Mitchell states it’s “mainly a funny effort to get an idea of how aggravated the world is at any type of minute,” and the system utilizes a color-coded risk level system varying from “primarily courteous” to “oh & @ #? @ &!” to convey the level of profanity being talked on Twitter at any sort of offered time. The listing of swear words is secret, however all of the typical seven …

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FCC will allow encryption of basic cable, offers measures to protect open access

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The days of plugging a TELEVISION into the wall and getting cable television are pertaining to an end. After a prolonged testimonial procedure, the FCC has actually granted cable operators consent to encrypt their many fundamental cable programs. But the commission is placing a number of measures it’s hoping will avoid the public from all of a sudden discovering themselves without access and open the door for third-party set-top boxes like the upcoming Boxee TELEVISION. That’s a major development for a cable market that has actually infamously been locked down over times. In order for the six largest US cable providers– Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Cox, Verizon, Charter, and AT&T– to obtain the go-ahead for encryption, they’ll have to satisfy one of 2 demands. The first involves … Continue

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Steve Ballmer’s Windows 8 rig measures 80 inches, so… does that do anything for ya?

Steve Ballmer's Windows 8 rig measures 80 inches, so... does that do anything for ya?

To all the executives out there, consider what you have hanging on the walls of your office. Perhaps it’s a fine work of art — maybe even an original — but it most certainly isn’t an 80-inch Windows 8 computer. That curious distinction belongs to Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, who has eschewed use of his phone, notepad and a more practical email solution in the name of awesomeness (or, perhaps compensation for those lagging Windows Phone sales.) Initially said to be a machine that’d be marketed and sold by Microsoft, the company has since clarified that no such effort will take place — although the door remains open for independent vendors to step in and sell similar behemoth Windows 8 setups. Unlike most tablets, we’ve a hard time imagining ol’ Steve throwing this one under his arm as he scoots out of the office… but then again, the man can afford some mighty good chiropractors.

Steve Ballmer’s Windows 8 rig measures 80 inches, so… does that do anything for ya? originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 26 May 2012 07:39:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWired  | Email this | Comments

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Sharp FanLabs goes inside soccer fans’ minds, measures loyalty with brainwaves (video)

No matter what country you’re in, you’ll find at least one body-painted sports nut willing to act a fool in the name of fandom. To figure out what makes these hooligans tick, Sharp’s setting up trucks outside EuroCup 2012 matches to measure fans’ brainwaves using biometric technology. Once inside these mobile FanLabs, volunteers will watch the game while wearing the company’s NeuroSky headsets — a super sensitive EEG that uses dry electrodes to measure cerebral activity. By looking at brainwaves, along with heart rate and vocal excitement, scientists hope to reveal what levels of attention, stress, relaxation and excitement a fan goes through while supporting a specific team. Even if you’re not lending your melon to science, you can still join in the fun online, and see how you stack up against fans from around the world. So, bust out the body paint, grab your foam fingers and check out the video after the break.

Continue reading Sharp FanLabs goes inside soccer fans’ minds, measures loyalty with brainwaves (video)

Sharp FanLabs goes inside soccer fans’ minds, measures loyalty with brainwaves (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 22 Oct 2011 22:26:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Humans Invent  |  sourceSharp FanLabs  | Email this | Comments

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Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini measures up to FCC scrutiny

We’ve already had some hands-on time with Sony Ericsson’s pint-sized Xperia Mini, and now it’s the FCC’s turn. The Android-packing smartphone got measured, prodded, and generally taken apart by the commission. The device, which the company is calling the “world’s smallest Android powered HD video smartphone,” is certainly tiny, but lacks the keyboard found on the similarly named Xperia Mini Pro, which also recently made its way through the FCC. Both are currently listed as “coming soon” on SE’s site.

Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini measures up to FCC scrutiny originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 28 Jul 2011 23:41:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Poker chip-sized device non-invasively measures brain temperature, intrigues Le Chiffre

Do you ever feel like Portal 2 is making your brain overheat? You should get that checked, and thanks to researchers in Norfolk, Virginia, there’s an easier way to do so. The Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters has developed a device the diameter of a poker chip that sits atop a patient’s head; by detecting the microwaves that all human tissues produce, it calculates brain temperature without the need for messy skull-popping. The waves pass through the bone to give doctors precise, up-to-the-minute results, which can help prevent brain damage due to overheating. One possible use for the technology is helping hypoxic (oxygen lacking) infants, who can be treated with cooling therapies. Of course, you can probably make do with that old home remedy: just put a bag of frozen carrots on your head next time GlaDOS has you stumped.

Poker chip-sized device non-invasively measures brain temperature, intrigues Le Chiffre originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 08 May 2011 19:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmag  |  sourceScience Newsline  | Email this | Comments

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Google preps Android for its corporate interview, adds new encryption and security measures

With over 300,000 devices activated per day, Android’s clearly firing on all cylinders from a consumer standpoint, but much like the famed Cheez-It wheel, some would argue that the OS isn’t quite mature enough for unabashed enterprise use. Being a corporation itself, El Goog’s obviously been toiling around the clock to change that, and it’s taking three major strides today. An updated version of its Google Apps Device Policy enables employees to secure a lost or stolen Android 2.2+ device by locating it on a map, ringing the device, and resetting the device PIN or password remotely via the new My Devices website. Furthermore, Apps admins now have an option in the control panel to “Encrypt Data on Device,” which will now include requiring encrypted storage on Android 3.0 tablets. Finally, Google Apps Lookup is acting as a type of internal blackbook, allowing users to easily sift through colleagues and contact them through one form or another. So… hired?

Google preps Android for its corporate interview, adds new encryption and security measures originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 09 Apr 2011 02:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Inquirer, Google Apps (1), (2)  |  sourceOfficial Google Enterprise Blog  | Email this | Comments

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Monirobo measures radiation following nuclear crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi power plant

According to a report by a Japanese news agency, a radiation monitoring robot, aptly named Monirobo, is the first non-human responder to go on-site following the partial meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The machine, which was developed by Japan’s Nuclear Safety Technology Centre to operate at lethal radiation levels, reportedly began work Friday, enlisting a 3D camera, radiation detector, and heat and humidity sensors to monitor the extent of the damage. A second Monirobo, used to collect samples and detect flammable gases, is expected to join its red counterpart soon — both robots are operated by remote control from distances up to one kilometer away. They join the US Air Force’s Global Hawk drone in unmanned surveillance of the crisis.

Monirobo measures radiation following nuclear crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi power plant originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 23 Mar 2011 01:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Boing Boing, NewScientist  |  sourcegetnews.jp  | Email this | Comments

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