Posts Tagged ‘granted’

Tony Fadell Says Nest Has 100 Patents Granted, 200 Filed, And 200 More Ready To File

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Many in the tech world and Washington have railed against the encroaching and limiting effect of patents on innovation, but when the chips are down, IP and patents remain key cornerstones in how tech companies and their founders are making sure they will be able to build their businesses and stick around for the long haul. Tony Fadell, the legendary former hardware supremo at Apple and now CEO and co-founder of new smart home device startup Nest, today revealed that Nest already had 100 patents granted, with 200 more on file with the USPTO and another 200 ready to file.

“At Nest what we did was make sure that we are putting [effort in] a ton of patents,” he said on stage today at the LeWeb conference on Paris. “This is what you have to do to disrupt major revenue streams.”

Nest, which first hit the market last year with a smart, design-friendly thermostat that you can control remotely with an iPhone app, this year added to its range with a smart smoke and carbon monoxide detection and alarm system. But the company has also had its share of patent heat.

nest-vs-honeywellIt has been embroiled in a thermostat-related patent infringement suit brought by appliance maker Honeywell initially in February 2012, and in November 2013 saw another patent suit get filed from BRK, makers of the First Alert smoke alarms, for infringements related to Nest’s second product.

Nest has also taken steps to buy insurance from elsewhere to shore up its patent position. In September it announced a deal with Intellectual Ventures — one of the most well-known of the patent hoarders — for access to some 40,000 patents via IV’s “IP for Defense” subscription-based product. Nest can draw on these patents as a defendant or in the event of a counterclaim — as it happens to be in the case of Honeywell.

Part of the IV deal also included the acquisition of an unspecified number of patents, “in areas of interest to Nest, including systems and methods for automatic registration of devices.” It is unclear whether Fadell’s patent citation today — totalling some 500 in all if you count granted patents, those waiting approval, and those yet to be filed — include the patents that Nest would have picked up from IV.

You might argue that part of Fadell’s bullishness about patents comes out of necessity because of these suits, but on the other hand you have to remember that he comes from Apple, one of the most aggressive technology companies when it comes to using patents to defend its products, and also filing a lot of them almost as a smokescreen to mask what it may be planning next.

Patents are not the only game in town, of course. In talking about what he saw as important elements of building a business, Fadell also touched on the challenges of hardware startups, and the pitfalls of Kickstarter. You can get a lot of public support (and even financial support) for an idea, but “if you do not plant the seeds early enough” for how you will manufacture and distribute that concept at scale, he said, you will not go anywhere. (Yes, he said this last year at LeWeb, too.)

The other area that Fadell believes we are seeing a shortfall is in how disruptive products are being marketed to consumers.

“You have to communicate what the problem is and what the benefit of the solution is,” as well as giving people an easy way to purchase it, he said. That is part of how you build trust for new, intelligent devices. “If people cannot trust our brand, our things will never sell,” said Fadell. “The ‘Internet of Things’ will never take off if people do not trust the products.”

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Workers in Silicon Valley no-hire scandal granted class-action status

Programmers and other technical employees whose wages were allegedly kept artificially low by widespread no-hire pacts between Apple, Google, Adobe, and Intel are being granted class action status. California district court judge Lucy Koh ruled that the antitrust concerns of the “overarching conspiracy” between 2005 and 2009 warranted trying the case en masse. According to a lawyer representing the plaintiffs, over 64,000 employees who worked at the four companies are potential class members. Intuit, Pixar, and Lucasfilm had been named as defendants in the original complaint, but have reached tentative settlements with the plaintiffs totaling $ 19 million, Bloomberg reports.

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Apple is Granted 41 Patents Today Covering New Authentication Options

Apple is Granted 41 Patents Today Covering New Authentication Options
After the polarizer structures have been cut into panels, the panels may be laminated to liquid crystal display structures, organic light-emitting-diode display structures, or other display structures using sheet-to-sheet lamination tools. A polarizer …
Read more on Patently Apple

Samsung releases curved OLED TV
OLED or organic light-emitting diode displays have naturally brilliant and vivid screens. They contain a film of organic compound that emits light when it encounters an electric current. The South Korean manufacturer also revealed new 55-inch and 60 …
Read more on The Australian

EDA-IP Update
A report predicts that demand for flexible OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes) will increase four-fold with sales reaching nearly $ 100million next year. The global market revenue for flexible OLEDs is expected to reach $ 94.8million, reports IHS in …
Read more on Chip Design Magazine

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Edward Snowden Granted Asylum In Russia

He has reportedly been given papers for one-year asylum in Russia.

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Nintendo granted patent for multi-display Panorama View feature on Wii U

Dualscreen gaming with Wii U controller gets patented,

Nintendo lays claim to among the more innovative implementations of dual-display gaming; its Panorama View Feature lets you move the Wii U controller to see a various point of view than what’s shown on the external TV display. The company was simply given a patent for this really technology, and the record goes into wonderful information about the gyrosensors used to determine the controller’s change in position. It’s a great deal easier in practice than in theory– just take an eye the image above or peek at our hands-on trial of the concept at E3 2012 (embedded below the break).

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Nintendo granted patent for multi-display Panorama View feature on Wii U

Dualscreen gaming with Wii U controller gets patented,

Nintendo claims one of the more innovative implementations of dual-display gaming; its Panorama View Attribute lets you move the Wii U controller to see a different point of view than exactly what’s shown on the external TV display. The company was simply given a patent for this very modern technology, and the file enters great detail about the gyrosensors utilized to determine the controller’s modification in position. It’s a whole lot easier in practice than in concept– just take an eye the image above or peek at our hands-on trial of the principle at E3 2012 (embedded below the break).

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Apple granted design patent for fourth-gen iPod touch, reminds us of the shorter, plumper past

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Merry Christmas! The USPTO is commemorating in a huge way, with the copyright stamp making some rather huge rounds today. Initially up is a design patent for an iPod touch, which Cupertino declared back in August of 2011. It looks to be the fourth-gen model from 2010, specifically offered that the patent concentrates on the really rounded edges. This iPod touch was the first variation to consist of both front – and rear-facing cameras, and in any case, the design is miles thicker and much shorter than this year’s touch. As Patently Apple points out, this record also takes place to be among the last to list Steve Jobs as a developer.

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AppleSource: USPTO

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Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1: U.S. Court Lifts Sales Ban Granted Prior To Apple Vs Samsung Patent Trial

galaxy tab 10.1

The Northern District Court of California has overturned a sales ban against the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 won by Apple in patent litigation against Samsung, Reuters is reporting.

This follows a ruling at the end of last month by the  U.S. Federal Circuit Court of Appeals that U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh could decide whether or not to lift the ban on U.S. sales of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1-inch tablet. Koh had previously refused to rule on the matter.

“We are pleased with the court’s action today, which vindicates our position that there was no infringement of Apple’s design patent and that an injunction was not called for,” Samsung is reported as saying in a statement.

We’ve contacted Apple and Samsung for further comment and will update with any response. Samsung provided the following statement: “On September 28, 2012, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit made a ruling, permitting the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California to consider our request to lift the preliminary injunction on the GALAXY Tab 10.1. We will continue to take all appropriate measures to ensure the availability of our innovative products.”

Apple filed for a preliminary injunction against Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet back in May ahead of the trial. In the U.S. the dispute focuses on the iPad D’889 design patent — Apple’s trade dress — but the jury in the Apple vs Samsung trial subsequently decided Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 had not infringed this design patent, effectively invalidating the earlier ruling banning U.S. sales.

However it’s not necessary the end of the road for the Tab 10.1 design disputes — FOSS Patents’ Florian Mueller notes that after a hearing scheduled for early December Apple can still win a permanent injunction against Samsung’s slate “over the D’889 tablet design patent if it prevails on the related part of its Rule 50 (“overrule-the-jury”) motion”.

Apple won an E.U.-wide preliminary injunction against the Galaxy Tab 10.1 last year – although this was subsequently lifted in all countries except Germany, where the sales ban was granted. The dispute over the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in the E.U. rested on Apple’s Community Design 000181607 for the iPad.



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Gogo Granted Spectrum Approval In Canada, Will Take Flight In 2013

gogo

Aircell ’ s Gogo in-flight Wi-Fi service will quickly be heading to the Great White North.

Introduced merely over 4 years ago, Gogo revealed today that it has been granted a subordinate spectrum permit in Canada. (They ’ ve leased spectrum from SkySurf, in situation you were asking yourself.) Cell site construction will begin in the 4th quarter of this year and will operate on the same frequency as Gogo ’ s existing network in the United States. Rollout of the ATG (air-to-ground) service is expected at some point towards the end of 2013.

Gogo ’ s in-flight Wi-Fi service will certainly “ focus ” on existing paths flown by the company ’ s present United States and Canadian airline partners. A company representative tells us the upcoming Canadian network will certainly be certified with Gogo ’ s next-gen ATG-4 system, which employs a directional antenna, dual modem and EV-DO Rev. B for speeds up to 9.8 Mbps.



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Kaleidescape DVD servers granted a temporary stay

Things have been looking bleak for Kaleidescape’s DVD servers since a Judge ruled against them on appeal, and earlier this month issued an injunction that was to have taken effect on April 8th. We say was because CEO Michael Malcolm is now saying the California 6th District Court of Appeal has issued a temporary stay of that injunction. The court is still deciding whether or not to stay the injunction during the entire process, a decision Malcolm says could affect whether or not the company survives or has to lay people off. While the current case does not affect Kaleidescape’s tethered Blu-ray servers, it’s tiring to hear about all this from the DVD CCA over a DRM scheme that was cracked wide open so long ago, and a case that had appeared to be over.

Kaleidescape DVD servers granted a temporary stay originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 02 Apr 2012 01:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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