Posts Tagged ‘Georgia’

Georgia Tech’s tongue-driven wheelchair outruns conventional rivals (video)

Georgia Tech tongue-controlled wheelchair

Georgia Tech has long wanted to show that tongue-controlled devices could help the disabled, and it now has solid proof. A new study shows that the school’s wearable Tongue Drive System lets the paralyzed control wheelchairs three times faster than they would using an ordinary breath-based approach. The speediness is due to TDS’ intuitive design, Georgia Tech says — wearers use a magnetic piercing in their tongue as a joystick, which is both faster and more logical than puffing into a straw. It’s subtler, too, as wearers don’t block their faces with as much equipment. Trials have so far been limited to hospitals and labs, but the findings pave the way for real-world tests. Eventually, Georgia Tech hopes for widespread use that improves tetraplegics’ mobility — and gives them more control over their lives.

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Source: Georgia Tech

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Georgia Tech’s tongue-driven wheelchair outruns conventional rivals (video)

Georgia Tech tongue-controlled wheelchair

Georgia Tech has long wanted to show that tongue-controlled devices could help the disabled, and it now has solid proof. A new study shows that the school’s wearable Tongue Drive System lets the paralyzed control wheelchairs three times faster than they would using an ordinary breath-based approach. The speediness is due to TDS’ intuitive design, Georgia Tech says — wearers use a magnetic piercing in their tongue as a joystick, which is both faster and more logical than puffing into a straw. It’s subtler, too, as wearers don’t block their faces with as much equipment. Trials have so far been limited to hospitals and labs, but the findings pave the way for real-world tests. Eventually, Georgia Tech hopes for widespread use that improves tetraplegics’ mobility — and gives them more control over their lives.

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University of Georgia stops plant photosynthesis to generate solar power

University of Georgia interrupts plant photosynthesis to make truly green energy

There’s a more efficient way to harvest energy from the backyard than by wiring up hapless critters. Researchers at the University of Georgia have proof: they’ve discovered a way to generate electricity from plants through hijacking the photosynthesis process. By altering the proteins inside a plant cell’s thylakoids, which store solar energy, scientists can intercept electrons through a carbon nanotube backing that draws them away before they’re used to make sugar. While the resulting power isn’t phenomenal, it’s still two orders of magnitude better than previous methods, according to the university. The protein modification method may have a rosier future, as well: the team believes that it could eventually compete with solar cells, producing green energy in a very literal sense.

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Via: Gizmag

Source: RSC Publishing, University of Georgia

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Semifinal 2 Rome, Georgia Qualifier FTC 2012

This is our team’s first semifinal round in the FIRST Tech Challenge(FTC) Qualifier at the Darlington School in Rome, Georgia. We are team Monkey Madness 5096 from Hampton Cove/Huntsville, Alabama. We have built a robot named Richard to grab racket balls and dispense them into a crate. After that, we move our crate to the safe zone to protect it from other robots. Then we hook on to it and lift it up to 5ft giving us a score around 90 points in addition to the 10 points for lifting it on the ramp. The bowling ball did not count in autonomous. If you would like to check out more of our team, visit our website at: teammonkeymadness.com.

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Researchers at Georgia Tech develop robot cameras that replicate eye movement

Georgia Tech robot camera

Scientists at Georgia Tech have successfully replicated muscle movement of the human eye in robots, a milestone they hope will improve the overall operation of our droid friends. Their research could also lead to numerous other benefits like safer robotic equipment, improved understanding of eye motion, and more intuitive video feeds from robot cameras. The secret to giving robots new anthropomorphic qualities lies in piezoelectric cellular actuator used by the team, which utilize biologically-inspired technology that allow a robot eye to behave more like our own.

“The actuators developed in our lab embody many properties in common with biological muscle, especially a cellular structure,” says lead researcher Joshua Schultz….

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Georgia Tech scientists developing biology-inspired system to give robot eyes more human-like motion

Georgia Tech scientists develop biologyinspired system to give robot eyes more humanlike motion

Having problem getting your robot parts to work as organized? Turn to nature– or far better yet, look inside yourself. After all, where far better to locate inspiration than the humans that the machines will one day enslave, right? Specialists at Georgia Tech have actually been working to develop a system to control video cameras in robots that utilizes similar performance as human muscle. Says Ph.D. prospect Joshua Schultz,

The actuators established in our lab manifest numerous properties in typical with biological muscle, particularly a cellular framework. Basically, in the human eye muscles are controlled by neural impulses. Eventually, the actuators we are establishing will be made use of to capture the kinematics and performance of the human eye.

The team recently flaunted their work at the EEE International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics in Rome. When fully developed, they anticipate that the piezoelectric system could be used for MRI-based surgery, rehabilitation and analysis of the human eye.

Georgia Tech experts developing biology-inspired system to offer robotic eyes more human-like movement appeared on Engadget on Sat, 07 Jul 2012 04:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for usage of feeds.

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Georgia Tech’s Shimi robot wants to rock with you all night, rock the night away

Georgia Tech's Shimi robot wants to rock with you all night, rock the night away

Shimi certainly has the makings of a viral video recording favorite, however its makers at Georgia Tech wish you to understand that there’s even more to the dancing robot than merely a pretty face. The “interactive musical buddy,” produced by the school’s Center for Music Innovation, is a one-foot-tall smartphone-enabled “docking station with a brain.” Shimi has a whole slew of performance, making use of the phone’s face-detection to track listeners and far better position its speakers. Users can easily also clap out a beat, which the ‘bot will utilize to pull a matching track from the phone’s playlist, playing the track and, naturally, dancing to the beat. Forthcoming capability features the ability for users to shake their heads or wave a hand to affect Shimi’s track choices. Google I/O attendees will definitely get the option for a closer consider Shimi this week in San Francisco. In the meantime, explore a couple of video presentations of the robotic doing its thing after the break.

Continue reading Georgia Tech’s Shimi robot desires to rock with you all evening, rock the night awayGeorgia Tech

‘s Shimi robot desires to rock with you all night, rock the night away appeared on Engadget on Wed, 27 Jun 2012 09:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Google details its use of treated wastewater at Georgia data center

Google pipes

Google has pledged to make water use a priority in its efforts to be a good environmental citizen, and the company has provided new details about its use of treated water at its Georgia data center. Google says it quickly realized that it didn’t need to use drinkable water to cool its servers, so it worked out a deal with the local water authority to siphon 30-percent of treated waste water that would otherwise flow into the prized Chattahoochee River and use that instead. Google says that its data centers use “half the energy of a typical data center,” in part because it uses “evaporative cooling” — a method that brings cold water into the data center and releases it as water vapor through cooling towers. With the new water source,…

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‘Gunna’ to ‘gunman’ autocorrect mishap leads to lockdown at two Georgia schools

Autocorrect fail

Text message autocorrect may not often lead to more than mildly comical mishaps, but today one instance of an unintended correction spread fears about a possible gunman and led to the lockdown of two Georgia schools, Gainesville Times reports. Police say that the text message, which was sent to the wrong phone number, was supposed to say “gunna be at west hall today” but was instead changed to “gunman be at west hall today.” The recipient then passed on the message to the police, who coordinated a lockdown at West Hall middle and high schools. The lockdown was later cancelled after authorities traced the message to a student and discovered that there was no actual threat. We’re not sure which platform performed the correction, but mobile…

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Georgia Tech researchers turn an iPhone into a Braille writer with BrailleTouch app

Georgia Tech researchers turn an iPhone into a Braille writer with BrailleTouch app

It wasn’t all that long ago that we saw a student turn a tablet into a Braille writer, and now some researchers from Georgia Tech have done the same thing for smaller touchscreens, too. The Yellow Jackets produced a prototype app, called BrailleTouch, that has six keys to input letters using the Braille writing system and audio to confirm each letter as it’s entered. To use the app, you simply turn the phone face down, hold it in landscape mode and start typing. As you can see above, it’s currently running on an iPhone, but the researchers see it as a universal eyes-free texting app for any touchscreen. Early studies with people proficient in Braille writing show that typing on BrailleTouch is six times faster than other eyes-free texting solutions — up to 32 words per minute at 92 percent accuracy. Skeptical of such speeds? Check out the PR and video of the app in action after the break.

Continue reading Georgia Tech researchers turn an iPhone into a Braille writer with BrailleTouch app

Georgia Tech researchers turn an iPhone into a Braille writer with BrailleTouch app originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 18 Feb 2012 20:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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