Apple’s fitness lab has collected 66,000 hours of exercise data

Men’s Health writer Ben Court got to take a look around Apple’s not-so-secret-anymore exercise lab and the company’s director of fitness for health technologies had some bold claims about the work the lab has done. Apple’s Jay Blahnik told Court, “Our lab has collected more data on activity and exercise than any other human performance study in history. Over the past five years, we’ve logged 33,000 sessions with over 66,000 hours of data, involving more than 10,000 unique participants.”

We’ll just have to take his word on those stats, but with dozens of researchers and medical professionals studying even larger numbers of exercising employees every day for years, it becomes easy to see how Apple can log those sorts of numbers. And those efforts should be visible in the upcoming WatchOS 4, which will reportedly include high-intensity interval training and the ability to pair with cardio machines.

Apple’s smartwatch has done well for the company, which is a major leader in the wearables industry, sporting around 50 percent year over year growth of its wearables sector during this year’s second quarter. The next version of the Apple Watch will reportedly have built-in cellular network support, meaning you won’t have to tote around your iPhone to use it. The launch date for WatchOS 4 is expected to be announced at Apple’s September 12th event.

Source: Men’s Health

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Apple Watch could soon track your sleep and fitness levels

The Apple Watch is billed as a fitness-focused device, but it doesn’t really make sense of fitness data — you’re supposed to interpret the numbers yourself. However, Apple might soon give its wristwear some added smarts. Bloomberg sources claim that the Apple Watch will get apps that track sleeping patterns and fitness levels. It’s not certain how the sleep tracking would work (most likely through motion), but the watch would gauge your fitness by recording the time it takes for your heart rate to drop from its peak to its resting level.

It’s not certain when you’d get the apps. Apple, for its part, hasn’t commented. However, neither of these new features would require new hardware. Sleep tracking wearables have been around for a while, and the fitness measurement would just be a matter of parsing the heart rate data you can get from any Apple Watch.

If real, the move would be part of a broader effort to transform Apple’s overall approach to health. Reportedly, it wants its HealthKit framework to help “improve diagnoses,” not just collect data. You and your doctor could watch out for telltale signs of a condition, or measure your progress on the road to recovery. This would undoubtedly help Apple’s bottom line (you’d have to use at least an iPhone to get this information), but it could also help you make important life decisions.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Bloomberg

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