Posts Tagged ‘favor’

Australia drops carbon tax in favor of paying industries to use clean energy

For years, Australia has tried to fight polluters through a carbon tax that charges the most egregious offenders based on their greenhouse gas emissions. Prime Minister Tony Abbott doesn’t believe that this strategy is helping much, however, and has…

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Instagram does your selfies a favor with an improved Lux feature for iOS

Go ahead, ask any youngster around you: selfies are serious business. No one is more mindful of that universal truth than Instagram, which is why it pushed out yet another iOS app update earlier today. No, there aren’t any new filters (isn’t 19…

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AT&T to streamline traditional voice plans in favor of Mobile Share

AT&T is planning to axe its traditional monthly calling and data plans for new customers — both individual and family — in favor of the network’s latest shared data options, Engadget has learned after receiving an anonymous tip and reaching out to AT&T. It appears that this move is in response to …

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Facebook kills physical Gifts in favor of digital redemption codes

Facebook kills physical Gifts in favor of ecodes, pokes sigh in relief

Not even a year after its inception, Facebook is killing physical Gifts. According to TechCrunch, the social media giant is ending its intermediary role for sending teddy bears, wine and chocolate (sounds romantic, no?) from its partners. Instead, it’s focusing on its own gift card, as well as redemption codes for iTunes credits and the like. Why? Well, aside from the cash the company will save, users simply weren’t buying physical Gifts all that much. The new Gift page will begin rolling out to ten percent of the site’s US userbase over the weekend, and the entire stateside population should see it within two weeks. It’s a little less personal, sure, but at least you won’t have to worry about getting your loved ones gift receipts.

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Source: TechCrunch

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Beats Electronics May Give HTC The Boot In Favor Of A New Investor

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Whether you like the company or not, people are snapping up Beats Electronics’ wares left and right. It’s no surprise then that Beats is looking to branch out into some new frontiers, and it may not want to do it without getting rid of some old baggage first. The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Beats is considering buying out Taiwanese gadget maker HTC’s remaining stake in the company and is also trying to lock down a new investor to help fund its expansion into consumer electronics and auto tech.

At this point, there’s no word on how much such a deal would cost, or if HTC is even willing to sell. To really get a feel for the situation though, we need to do a little rewinding.

This whole sordid situation started back in August 2011 when HTC revealed that it acquired a majority stake (about 50.1%, to be specific) in Beats Audio, a deal that cost the Taiwanese company just north of $ 300 million. It wasn’t long until the first Beats Audio-powered smartphones started rolling off of HTC’s production lines, and since then just about every one of the company’s notable smartphones bore that familiar red logo somewhere on its body.

Of course, that relationship wasn’t without its rough patches. Between the moment HTC finalized its deal with Beats Audio and today, the company has been absolutely battered — sales revenue is down, profits are down, and more than a few pundits have already written the company off (or are close to doing it). The situation grew so grim that HTC found itself selling nearly half of its stake back to Beats Audio in mid-2012, which reportedly resulted in a net loss of about $ 4.8 million for the Taiwanese gadget maker.

What’s still unclear at this point is what this turn of events could mean for Beats Audio in smartphones going forward. If Beats indeed buys out HTC’s stake, it’s not inconceivable that other smartphone manufacturers could swoop in and license whatever Beats Audio assets the company originally made available to HTC. And for all we know, HTC may be one of them — it could just decide to fold Beats Audio into its phones like nothing ever happened, albeit without most favored nation status. It’s near-impossible to make a call there without a closer understanding of the agreement the two companies forged, but I wouldn’t expect the Beats Audio brand to remain dormant in the mobile space for very long (if at all).

But Beats’ bid for another investor comes at a pretty peculiar time. There’s little doubt that HTC wanted to lock up a partnership with Beats because of the marketing clout the brand would bring its mobile gadgets, and now Beats is looking for a way out just as HTC is trying to tap into another vein of star power to revitalizing its anemic marketing efforts. For better or worse, the company is spending nearly a billion dollars on a massive marketing push that will apparently see Hollywood hotshot Robert Downey Jr. spout nonsensical interpretations of the company’s name. I may be veering slightly into the realm of the hyperbolic, but HTC really can’t afford for this kooky new approach not to work. Couple that with the fact that a Beats buyback would be yet another sizable signifier of lost faith in HTC and things are starting to look seriously dire.

I’ve reached out to HTC for a comment on all this, but it’s pretty late and the company hasn’t yet responded at time of writing — I’ll update the post with a response if/when I get one.

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FCC chairman nominee Tom Wheeler comes out in favor of legalized phone unlocking

He was nominated to replace Julius Genachowski as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission a mere six weeks ago, and before he’s even got the job, Tom Wheeler’s making headlines. Ars Technica reports that would-be chairman Wheeler wants what many (all?) cell phone owners want — the ability to unlock our phones free from fear of legal retribution. The way he sees things, when folks have bought and paid for their phones and are contract-free, they “ought to have the right to use the device and move it across carriers.” Unfortunately, while he’s staked out his position on the matter, he has yet to say exactly how he plans to make phone unlocking legal, be it through legislation or other means. The good news is, he’s not the boss just yet, so he’s got time to address those niggling details while he waits to be confirmed as the new chairman.

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Source: Ars Technica

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Microsoft Points phased out in favor of cash in Windows 8

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Microsoft has actually started to remove its Points repayments system as the default way to pay for new music downloads and motion picture leasings or purchases in Windows 8. The recent modification impacts the way Windows 8 individuals will pay for digital material in the os. Formerly, in Windows 8 betas, Microsoft used its Points system for all Video purchases and leasings.

The controversial currency for Xbox Live and the Zune Marketplace has actually been commonly utilized around the Xbox 360 to acquire Xbox Live Game games, gamertag photos, and additional downloadable material. The system means users have to purchase bundles of points that correspond to 80 Microsoft Points for each $ 1. In our own testing in the last copy of Windows 8, we are now able to pay for new music or …

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FCC votes in favor of rethinking spectrum holding rules, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs

Cellular tower worker

FCC meetings could be momentous celebrations under the right situations, although it’s hardly ever the instance that we see the agency pass two possibly far-reaching measures in one sitting, like we just saw on Friday. To start, regulators have actually voted in favor of a proposition that will certainly review spectrum sale rules and may drop the case-by-case determinations in favor of a more constant screening mechanism. The reexamination will additionally consider a change to the ownership regulations surrounding wireless network frequencies that treats bands below 1GHz in a different way than those above– the far better to attend to a chorus of smaller sized carriers that do not such as all the prime spectrum going to the companies with the most current clout, namely AT&T and Verizon. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski says that reform can spur innovation with more competition, although dissenting Commissioner Robert McDowell is fretted that constant guidelines will in some way produce “uncertainty.”

Side-by-side with the evaluation, the FCC is proposing an incentive-based reverse auction technique to have TELEVISION broadcasters voluntarily quit their spectrum for cellular and information use. The multi-phase approach would have TV carriers set the rate at which they’re ready to offer their spectrum to the FCC; those that simply cannot bear to part with their airwaves would be confined into a tighter band array to create larger offered regularity blocks in the auction that follows. As with additional FCC proposals, there’s most likely to be a long interval between the auction vote, the review and any definitive rulemaking, let alone an effect– auctions on their own can easily take years to play out. Still, any sort of success with the measures could head off spectrum crunches while concurrently preventing any sort of remedies from consolidating too much power and producing their very own problems.

[Tower picture through Shutterstock]

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re-thinking spectrum holding guidelines, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 28 Sep 2012 21:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for usage of feeds. Permalink FierceWireless, Ars Technica|FCC (1), (2)|Email this|Opinions

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FCC votes in favor of rethinking spectrum holding rules, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs

Cellular tower worker

FCC meetings can be momentous occasions under the right circumstances, although it’s seldom the case that we see the agency pass two potentially far-reaching measures in one sitting, like we just saw on Friday. To start, regulators have voted in favor of a proposal that will review spectrum sale rules and might drop the case-by-case determinations in favor of a more consistent screening mechanism. The reexamination will also consider a change to the ownership rules surrounding wireless frequencies that treats bands below 1GHz differently than those above — the better to address a chorus of smaller carriers that don’t like all the prime spectrum going to the companies with the most existing clout, namely AT&T and Verizon. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski argues that reform could spur innovation through more competition, although dissenting Commissioner Robert McDowell is worried that consistent rules will somehow create “uncertainty.”

Side-by-side with the review, the FCC is proposing an incentive-based reverse auction strategy to have TV broadcasters voluntarily give up their spectrum for cellular and data use. The multi-phase approach would have TV providers set the price at which they’re willing to sell their spectrum to the FCC; those that just can’t bear to part with their airwaves would be corralled into a tighter band range to make for larger available frequency blocks in the auction that follows. As with other FCC proposals, there’s likely to be a long interval between the auction vote, the review and any definitive rulemaking, let alone an impact — auctions by themselves can take years to play out. Still, any success with the measures could head off spectrum crunches while simultaneously preventing any solutions from consolidating too much power and creating their own problems.

[Tower photo via Shutterstock]

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FCC votes in favor of rethinking spectrum holding rules, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 28 Sep 2012 21:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink FierceWireless, Ars Technica  |  sourceFCC (1), (2)  | Email this | Comments

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Chrome Web Store offers app recommendations from your Google+ mates, allows you to return the favor

Chrome Web Store offers app recommendations from your Google mates, allows you to return the favor

Aiming to your internet pals for some Chrome Web Shop ideas? If so, the folks at Google have just made accessing stated listing of suggestions much easier. The wardrobe unveiled a new characteristic for the application repository that permits you to see all of the add-ons that your Google + mates are raving about. You’ll additionally have the ability to offer some suggestions of your very own thanks to the addition of the trusty +1 button on the information page of each providing. Simply in instance you forget to hit the “From Your Circles” link before scanning, each application will certainly bear a stamp of approval– ought to it be deemed worthy of the extra clicks. If you’re short on acquaintances or are still new to the social network, the Chrome dev group’s listings will certainly appear for you as well.

Chrome World wide web Store supplies application suggestions from your Google + mates, allows you to return the favor appeared on Engadget on Wed, 04 Jul 2012 02:10:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink| Google sourceChrome Blog site|Email this|Opinions

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