Posts Tagged ‘eyeson’

Daily Roundup: MakerBot Digitizer eyes-on, BlackBerry’s bad news, iPhone 5s goes on sale, and more!

DNP The Daily RoundUp

You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours — all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

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MakerBot Digitizer eyes-on

MakerBot Digitizer eyeson

This ain’t the same Digitizer we saw back at South by Southwest. The prototype that was unveiled in Austin back in March looked an awful lot like those early generation MakerBot printers, borrowing heavily from the plywood aesthetic that seemed to imply that its creators had built the thing with their own hands. The version the company showed off at SXSW was in keeping with the company’s mission statement of building things themselves, featuring a laser-cut wood frame and 3D printed parts. But the Brooklyn company’s come a long way since those simpler RepRap days, growing into the leading light in the world of consumer-facing 3D printers.

The Replicator 2 really drove the point home with a solidly constructed black frame that eschewed its predecessors’ wood finish, and the Digitizer can easily be viewed as part of a matching set. “The MakerBot Digitizer started because I really wanted a 3D scanner to go with our 3D printer,” said CEO Bre Pettis at today’s event at the company’s office in Brooklyn, “and they were all too expensive.” The 3D scanner joins the Replicator, MakerWare and the online community Thingiverse as the major missing piece of the MakerBot ecosystem puzzle, an attempt to create the most user-friendly 3D-printing ecosystem available. Now you can download, create and scan your way into the 3D-printing world, from the comfort of your own (admittedly sizable desktop).

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DisplayLink’s adaptor streams 4K content over USB 2.0 and 3.0 (eyes-on)

DisplayLink's streams 4K content over USB 20 and 30 eyeson

DisplayLink’s been wringing all kinds of connectivity out of our computer’s USB ports for years, turning one connection into many. It should come as no surprise, then, that the company’s using its considerable compression expertise to send high-resolution 4K video through that very same pipe. Ideally, the system shoots video over USB 3.0, while still giving users the full connectivity options of any compatible DisplayLink device — but it can also function using USB 2.0, though the dynamically compensating data compression at work may cause some frames to drop.

We chatted with Displaylink’s Director of Marketing, Andy Davis, about the feature and he informed us that the new 4K capability comes courtesy of a chip design first revealed back at CES that, while upping the max resolution of transmitted video, has no trouble driving multiple displays. In theory,the number of 4K screens the chip can drive is only limited by the graphics drivers and video decoding capabilities of the computer it’s connected to. And, the new architecture also enables wireless streaming of 4K video using 802.11ad and can stream 1080p video over 802.11ac (4K over 802.11ac is in the works). We got to see a brief demo of the technology in action, and the video played back flawlessly over USB 3.0 for the few minutes we saw it work. Using 2.0, we noticed a slight flicker once or twice during playback, but the feed was still quite watchable. All in all, its a nice addition to the DisplayLink feature set. Now if they’d just let us know when we’ll actually see it implemented in something we can buy.

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Eyes-on with Samsung’s 31.5-inch 4K PC monitor

Eyes-on with Samsung's 4K 31.5-inch PC monitor

Samsung’s continuing the UHD TV march here at IFA with plenty of sets, but it’s also showing a 4K (3,840 x 2,160) 31.5-inch monitor that’s built to sit on your desktop. Crisp images deliver on the Ultra High Definition promise, but the colors are particularly vibrant, due in part to the LED panel’s ability to reproduce 1.07 billion colors and pictures that can cram in 99 percent of Adobe’s RGB color spectrum. Because of that, the set easily distances itself from others that have flat, dull image reproduction. However, viewing angles leave something to be desired, as standing far off to the side clouds the monitor. Not only does this piece of kit churn out good imagery, but it easily tilts and pivots into a vertical position, to boot. When it comes to connectivity, the screen packs four USB ports and slots for HDMI, DVI-DL and DPX2. If you’re ready to hook up this display to your PC, there will be some waiting involved — no pricing or release details have been divulged. If you’d like to gawk at the firm’s hardware, look out below for our gallery.%Gallery-slideshow83282%

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Dell shows off the UltraSharp 32: a 32-inch Ultra HD display set to arrive in Q4 (eyes-on)

Dell shows off the UltraSharp 32: a 32-inch 4K Ultra HD display set to arrive in Q4 (eyes-on)

If you’re looking to boost the resolution of your workflow, Dell took the opportunity to unleash one such display during the proceedings at SIGGRAPH this week. The UltraSharp 32 is a 32-inch Ultra HD unit that wields a 3,840 x 2,160 IGZO panel sorting 1.07 billion colors. An aluminum stand has replaced the plastic-draped one from previous models, but the same height adjustments reside around back. The UltraSharp 32 also houses both full and mini display ports (with the requisite cable included), HDMI jack, a built-in USB hub and an SD card reader along the left side. We had a chance to take a quick peek at the device and we can confirm the image quality — especially when it comes to handling rich blacks. We also enjoyed gazing upon a matte finish rather than a glossy surface and we’re told Dell has actually made some tweaks there to reduce any grainy results that may creep in. There’s no word on pricing just yet, but the display is set to arrive during the fourth quarter of this year. A smattering of images from our brief eyes-on session await in the gallery.

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Intel Labs developing ‘talking’ tail lights for safer roads, we go eyes-on (video)

Talking tail lights could lead to safer roads

Smarter headlights could guide you out of a rainstorm, but intelligent tail lights could enable communication between vehicles. At least, that’s the idea behind a collaborative Connected Vehicle Safety project between Intel and National Taiwan University. Its purpose is so that you’ll be able to know just what the vehicles around you are up to — whether they’re speeding or braking or making a left — by receiving data from their tail lights. Your vehicle could then stop or accelerate automatically without you needing to intervene, or you could choose to react manually if desired. We saw a demonstration of the concept at a Research @ Intel event in San Francisco with a couple of scooters, so head on past the break to learn how it all works, with video to boot.

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Intel’s working on DIY programmable home automation, we go eyes-on with its proof-of-concept (video)

Intel's working on DIY programmable home automation, we go eyeson with its proof of concept

The internet of things is growing, friends, and Intel knows it. From WiFi lightbulbs to smart thermostats and door locks, it seems that most everything in our homes will have some sort of connectivity in the not-so-distant future. That’s why chipzilla’s research arm has been working on a way to program all of those devices and make it easy enough so that any do-it-yourselfer can get her home working the way she wants it to. The key is getting all of these future devices to work together, and Intel’s plan is to build a platform that’ll talk to most any PCB (Arduino, Beagle Boards, etc.) over any wireless protocol (WiFi, Bluetooth, Zigbee, et al.).

A layer of middleware lets the bits of hardware talk to each other on an ad-hoc basis, so that say, when a baby monitor hears a crying child, it can tell a nearby stereo to tee up some soothing tunes to put him back to sleep automagically. The system actions are crafted using an easy-to-use HTML 5 programming environment, and will be deposited in a software library of modules that can be accessed by end users. Then, home automators can utilize a simple GUI editor to tailor their system to their wishes. We got to see a proof-of-concept system in person today, so head on past the break for a full video explanation and a demo of it in action.

Nicole Lee contributed to this report.

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Polk Audio Xbox N1 Surroundbar and 133t gaming headphones eyes-on

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“The average age of a gamer is 35,” according to the Polk Audio rep I spoke with. “We’re not making products for 13-year-olds.” And we’ll give it to the company, the two new devices it’s showing off at E3 this week aren’t half bad looking. Granted, they’re not as slick as some of the higher end products the audio company has shown off in the past, but as far as gaming-centric devices go, they’re not too shabby. According to the company, Microsoft approached it specifically to create peripherals for the Xbox, leading Polk to give the world the 133t Gaming Headphones and N1 Surroundbar.

The 133ts eschew the standard external gaming mic for a little nub that juts out from one ear. To mute it, you just click it back up inside the cup. The headphones also feature a mixer that plugs directly into the controller to help eliminate cords and lets you adjust sound settings on the fly. The Surroundbar, meanwhile, was designed specifically with the Xbox in mind, featuring four modes: Racer, FPS, Music and Cinema, so you can switch between gaming and standard media consumption. The Soundbar is set for a fall release, with the 133t coming some time in Q4. More info in a press release after the break.

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Acer shows off Aspire R7 Star Trek edition, we go eyes-on at Computex

Acer shows off Aspire R7 Star Trek edition, we go eyeson at Computex

No, we’re not making this up. We’ve always thought the Aspire R7 bore an uncanny resemblance to the USS Enterprise, and now it appears that Acer’s officially in on the fun, too. Our friends at Engadget Chinese stumbled upon a new version of the starship-esque convertible at Acer’s Computex booth today — the company manufactured just 25 of these special-edition notebooks, one of which it plans to offer up on eBay from June 14th through the 24th, with all proceeds going to charity. This variant is unique enough for us to look past the device’s shortcomings, and perhaps place a bid of our own. Star Trek (and industrial design) fans can get their fix in the eyes-on gallery just below.

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Source: Engadget Chinese

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LG’s 5-inch HD Oxide mobile display has a 1mm-slim bezel, we go eyes-on at SID

LG's 5inch HD Oxide mobile display has a 1mmslim bezel, we go eyeson at SID

LG’s flexible OLED display is just one of the company’s many panels on show here at SID. Our next stop in the booth tour is a 5-inch HD prototype, which uses TFT Oxide technology for low power consumption and a super-slim profile. Like the 5-inch flexible panel, this guy sports a 1mm bezel, and a rep told us it utilizes IPS technology to offer wide viewing angles. The model you see here is rated at 250 nits, though LG expects a significantly higher brightness count by the time the panel makes it to market. As for when that will happen, “ASAP” is the only answer we received. Hit up our photo gallery below for a closer look.

Zach Honig contributed to this report.

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