Posts Tagged ‘Correction’

Correction: Switzerland Now Has An Incredible Competitor

apple0288 So here we are, in the hours after the official launch of the Apple Watch, and we need to address just what the watch means for Switzerland. When I first saw the watch I literally thought that Jony Ive was right in regards to how – ahem – ruined the Swiss watch industry was. However, as I thought about what the Apple Watch was (and wasn’t) I’ve come to a more nuanced… Read More

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Moog’s Theremini suits all skill levels with adjustable scale correction for its space-controlled tunes

Sure, Moog is known to many for cranking out stellar analog synthesizers, but the outfit also has a knack for building a stable of Etherwave Theremins. In fact, founder Bob Moog started tinkering with the space-controlled instruments back in 1954. If …

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Robo-guard the South Korean correction service robot says ‘stay out of trouble’ (video)

Robo-guard the South Korean correction service robot says 'stay out of trouble' (video)

It sounds like the sequel that didn’t even make it to DVD: RoboCop’s jaded, rotund, less attractive younger brother, who never made the police force — and tired of living in his sibling’s shadow — took a job as the next best thing: a prison guard. Well, that might not make the silver screen, but it’s certainly reality TV. Meet Robo-guard, the world’s first robotic correctional officer. Developed in South Korea, Robo-guard is equipped with 3D cameras that let it observe inmates, while special software looks out for changes in behavior. Should anything suspicious be detected, he’ll raise the alarm. A lone wolf, he works his beat autonomously, but can also be controlled manually via an iPad, if human colleagues want to check what’s going down. Initial field trials are under way right now, and if all goes well, he’ll earn a place in more prisons. Who knows, he may even make deputy one day.

Continue reading Robo-guard the South Korean correction service robot says ‘stay out of trouble’ (video)

Robo-guard the South Korean correction service robot says ‘stay out of trouble’ (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 15 Apr 2012 09:35:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PC World  |  sourceReuters  | Email this | Comments

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Yale Physicists develop quantum computing error correction, are a qubit pleased with themselves

We’re big fans of quantum computing, and hopefully it’s about to get a lot more reliable. Researchers at Yale have demonstrated quantum error correction in a solid state system for the first time. Quantum bits were created from “artificial” atoms using superconducting circuits, these qubits are then given either of the typical bit states of “1″ or “0,” or the quantum state of both simultaneously. The researchers developed a technique that identifies each qubit’s initial state, so any erroneous changes can be reversed on the fly. Until now, errors have been a barrier in quantum computing, accumulating and ultimately causing computational failure. A reliable means of fixing these state changes is essential to developing a computer with an exponential speed-up, and fully realizing the quantum dream. The team at Yale hopes that this research might mean its platform of superconducting circuits becomes the one upon which quantum computing is ultimately built. We, on the other hand, just want our parallel universe.

Yale Physicists develop quantum computing error correction, are a qubit pleased with themselves originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 15 Feb 2012 21:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PhysOrg  |  sourceYale  | Email this | Comments

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Apple Attempting To Patent In-Camera Perspective Correction


More patents from Apple, adding to the rumors that the iPhone 5 will have a significantly upgraded camera. Today’s patent, filed on December 22nd, 2009 (and not yet granted), is about making automatic corrections to an image based on distance and orientation measurements taken within the device. There are plenty of filters and tools for this purpose in image editing programs, but I don’t recall ever seeing on-device correction.

The process is fairly straightforward, and interestingly, relies primarily on hardware to determine correction, rather than processor-intensive image analysis. Orientation data would be taken from accelerometers or an additional device attached to the image sensor. Distance could be determined ultrasonically, though I’m not sure I believe that Apple would go that far in support hardware.

The effect would be to straighten your picture or re-distort the perspective to create a more even image. Again, standard stuff in Photoshop and Lightroom, but in-camera, not so much. One problem: these are destructive changes, not metadata, as the workflows they describe seem to come before the encode/write operation.

Some people might think this will lead to lazy photography, but the fact is on such a small and light device as an iPhone, and with its natural tendency to lag a bit before exposure, it’s not always easy to get alignment just right. And it’s just something you’d correct in post anyway. Whether (and how) this will actually be implemented is unclear, though, as it implies some fairly serious hardware changes. We’ll be on the lookout for more info.

[via Photography Bay]



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Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND

Solid state storage is fantastic stuff, durable and lightning-quick, but it’s got its fair share of quirks — bits fail, pages fill up, and cells deteriorate over time. Typically, the onus is on a beefy controller to take care of your drive and make sure it lasts a good long while (which is why brand names like SandForce can make or break an SSD) but it looks like Micron is planning to usurp some of that responsibility with its new ClearNAND chips. Simply put, each ClearNAND memory module has a built-in 24-bit error correction engine, so your drive’s host controller doesn’t have to shoulder that load, and can focus on the good stuff — like getting your data delivered at speeds that would obliterate traditional hard drives. Micron says the new chips are available right now in 25nm sizes. Want a more technical rundown? Hit up our more coverage link to hear what this might mean for the error-prone future of the medium. PR after the break.

Continue reading Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND

Micron embeds error correction in flash memory chips, calls it ClearNAND originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 05 Dec 2010 18:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PhysOrg  |  sourceMicron  | Email this | Comments
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Correction to Microsoft Kin & Windows Phone 7 Video in regards to the Zune software


PLEASE NOTE: YOU MUST WATCH Microsoft Kin & Windows Phone 7 FIRST! Otherwise, you WILL be lost! I found out that Microsoft will be providing a media syncing software package for use with iTunes & iPhoto, and it will be for the Mac. I am eating crow, and the taste is bitter, indeed.

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