Posts Tagged ‘cores’

AMD Jaguar: the Xbox One and PS4 cores that could power your next cheap laptop

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AMD boasted that its Z-60 Hondo chip would bring Call of Duty to thin tablets, and its boasts were for naught, but it looks like the company’s latest processor core is going to see a lot of use in the next generation of cheap laptops. Today, AMD has revealed its basic performance claims for its Jaguar core, the same one that’s reportedly built into the chips in both the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. The resulting Temash and Kabini APUs could finally have the combination of performance and battery life you’d need in an inexpensive Windows 8 tablet or laptop.


While some of AMD’s charts are a little misleading out of context, this one is fairly straightforward: AMD claims that its low-power Temash system-on-chip simultaneously manages to…

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Stanford seizes 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

Stanford commandeers 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

In brief order, the Sequoia supercomputer and its 1.57 million processing centers will shift to a life of top-secret analysis at the National Nuclear Protection Administration, but till that day comes, analysts are presently working to ensure its seamless operation. Most lately, a group from Stanford took the helm of Sequoia to run computational fluid dynamics simulations– a process that requires a carefully tuned balance of computation, memory and communication parts– in order to better understand engine sound from supersonic jets. As a motivating sign, the group had the ability to effectively push the CFD simulation beyond 1 million cores, which is a first of its kind and bodes effectively for the scalability of the system. This and various other examinations are presently being performed on Sequoia as part of its “shakeout” period, which allows its caretakers to much better understand the capabilities of the IBM BlueGene/Q computer. Should all go well, Sequoia is arranged to begin a life of government work in March. In the meantime, you’ll discover a couple views of the setup after the break.

Stanford scientists commandeer 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

Stanford scientists commandeer 1 million processing cores to study supersonic noise

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Cray unleashes 100 petaflop XC30 supercomputer with up to a million Intel Xeon cores

Cray launches XC30 supercomputer behemoth, scales to 100 petaflops, a million Xeon cores

Cray has actually just fired a nuclear salvo in the supercomputer wars with the launch of its XC30, a 100 petaflop-capable brute that could scale up to one million cores. Developed in conjunction with DARPA, the Cascade-codenamed system utilizes a new sort of architecture called Aries adjoin and Intel Xeon E5-2600 processors to effortlessly leapfrog its recent Titan brother or sister, the previous speed champ. That places Cray well ahead of rivals like China’s Tianhe-2, and the company will aim to keep that edge by supercharging future variations with Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors and NVIDIA Tesla GPUs. High-end study centers have put $ 100 million worth of orders up until now (though unusually, DARPA isn’t really one of them yet), and systems are already delivering in restricted numbers– likely by the eighteen-wheeler-full, from the looks of it. Continue reading Cray unleashes 100 petaflop XC30 supercomputer with up to a million Intel Xeon coresFiled under: Misc, ScienceCray releases 100 petaflop XC30 supercomputer with up to a million Intel Xeon cores initially appeared on Engadget on Thu, 08 Nov 2012 10:58:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds. Permalink The Register|| Email this|Remarks

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Tilera sees sense in the server wars, puts just 36 cores in its newest processor

While Tilera’s forthcoming 100-core processors threaten to set off fire alarms around the world, the company has finally brought out its more sensible 36-core variant. The 1.2GHz Tile-GX36 sips just 24 watts and is designed to be especially handy with short and sharp jobs like processing internet transactions. It’s a reduced instruction set (RISC) chip, so it’s less power hungry and cheaper than Intel’s x86 silicon. It also sports 64-bit architecture, whereas rival ARM is set to remain 32-bit until 2014. Then again, with Tilera lagging behind in terms of brand recognition and software support, a two-year head start might not be long enough.

Tilera sees sense in the server wars, puts just 36 cores in its newest processor originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 Jan 2012 10:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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New Samsung chip has two of everything: two cores, 2GHz, 2560 x 1600 graphics

Sammy’s current Cortex A9-based chips are hardly slackers — the Galaxy Note already proved that to any lingering doubters. Nevertheless, the next-gen Exynos 5250 SoC promises to double that sort of performance, by harnessing two Cortex-A15 chips clocked at 2GHz each, along with a GPU that can output resolutions of up to 2560 x 1600 (WQXGA). It’s like big.LITTLE computing, except without the LITTLE. Samsung reckons it’ll start mass producing the 5250 for use in high-end tablets by the second quarter of next year, which should be just in time to stop NVIDIA from getting too cocky.

New Samsung chip has two of everything: two cores, 2GHz, 2560 x 1600 graphics originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 30 Nov 2011 07:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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NVIDIA announces special edition GTX 560 Ti with 448 CUDA cores, available now for $289

Now that we’re officially in the throes of holiday shopping season, NVIDIA’s rolling out a promotion of its own, though sadly it doesn’t involve any steep discounts. The outfit just announced a special edition GPU: the GTX 560 Ti with 448 CUDA cores, running at 1.46GHz, a 732MHz graphics clock and 1.25GB of GDDR5 memory charging ahead at an effective rate of 3.8GHz. Other features include support for three-way SLI, DisplayPort, HDMI and DVI. Those specs place it snugly between the current GTX 560 Ti with 384 CUDA cores, and the higher-end GTX 570, which packs 480. If this seems like a puzzling move, it is indeed the first time NVIDIA’s bothered with a limited holiday edition card, though in conversations with reporters the company made it clear its new hardware is meant to dovetail with the arrival of games like The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Battlefield 3 and Batman: Arkham City. If you’re shopping for a gamer (or, you know, yourself), it’s available now for $ 289 in the US, Canada, UK France, Germany Russia and Nordic countries through companies like ASUS, MSI and Gigabyte, among others.

NVIDIA announces special edition GTX 560 Ti with 448 CUDA cores, available now for $ 289 originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 29 Nov 2011 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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AMD’s Bobcat and Bulldozer, 2011 flagship CPU cores, detailed today

One of these days AMD is gonna have to stop talking about its Atom-killing Bobcat and Xeon-ending Bulldozer cores and finally release them. But, until that happy moment arrives in 2011 (fingers crossed), we’ll have to content ourselves with more presentation slides. First up, the Bobcat core is AMD’s long overdue play for the netbook/ultrathin market. Pitched as having 90 percent of the performance of current-gen, K8-based mainstream chips, AMD’s new mobility core will require “less than half the area and a fraction of the power” of its predecessors. That sounds like just the recipe to make the company relevant in laptop purchasing decisions again, while a touted ability for the core to run on less than one watt of power (by lowering operating frequencies and voltages, and therefore performance) could see it appear in even smaller form factors, such as MIDs. The Bobcat’s now all set to become the centerpiece of the Ontario APU — AMD’s first Fusion chip, ahead of Llano — which will be ramping up production late this year, in time for an early 2011 arrival.

The Bulldozer also has a future in the Fusion line, but it’s earliest role will be as a standalone CPU product for servers and high-end consumer markets. The crafty thing about its architecture is that every one Bulldozer module will be counted as two cores. This is because AMD has split its internal processing pipelines into two (while sharing as many internal components as possible), resulting in a sort of multicore-within-the-core arrangement. The way the company puts it, it’s multithreading done right. Interlagos is the codename of the first Opteron chips to sport this new core, showing up at some point next year in a 16-core arrangement (that’s 8 Bulldozers, if you’re keeping score at home) and promising 50 percent better performance than the current Magny-Cours flagship. Big words, AMD. Now let’s see you stick to a schedule for once.

Gallery: AMD’s Bobcat and Bulldozer, 2011 flagship CPU cores, detailed today

AMD’s Bobcat and Bulldozer, 2011 flagship CPU cores, detailed today originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 24 Aug 2010 00:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Dell Studio XPS 9100 arrives with six cores, little fanfare

AMD had its turn in the high-end Dell desktop spotlight, but it’s time for another Intel beast, as the company’s quietly upgraded its tower lineup to support Intel’s consumer-grade champion chip, the 3.33GHz Core i7-980X. While the new Studio XPS 9100 looks just the same as its predecessor on the outside and sports the same basic options and ports, internally there’s a 525W power supply with enough juice for a Radeon HD 5970 2GB graphics card (a $580 option) and slots for up to 24GB of DDR3 memory. You won’t be getting any of this pixel-pushing goodness on the $950 base model, of course, which has only a (respectable) quad-core 2.66GHz Core i7-920 and an Nvidia GeForce G310 512MB, but the machine looks like it could hold its own with low-end Alienware cousins if you get into $2,000+ territory. Call us crazy, but we think there’s a configurator session with your name on it.

Dell Studio XPS 9100 arrives with six cores, little fanfare originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 31 Jul 2010 19:13:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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