Posts Tagged ‘contact’

Google Patents Tiny Cameras Embedded In Contact Lenses

Hand holding - zoomed in Google has a new patent application with the USPTO (via 9to5Google), which takes one of the basic concepts of Glass and extends it even further, embedding tiny cameras that could be embedded in contact lenses for various uses, including photographing what a wearer sees, or providing the basic input for a contact-based assistive device for the visually impaired. Google has previously detailed a… Read More

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Google Unveils Smart Contact Lens That Lets Diabetics Measure Their Glucose Levels

Hand holding - zoomed in

This isn’t Google Glass in a contact lens, but it may just be Google’s first step in this direction. The company’s Google X lab just teased a smart contact lens on its blog that is meant to help diabetics measure their glucose levels.

The company says it is currently testing prototypes of this contact lens that use a tiny wireless chip and a miniaturized glucose sensor. These chips are embedded in between two soft layers of lens material.

In its announcement, Google notes that scientists have long looked into how certain body fluids can help them track glucose levels. Tears, it turns out, work very well, but given that most people aren’t Hollywood actors and can cry on demand, using tears was never really an option.

According to Google, the sensor can take about one reading per second, and it is working on adding tiny LED lights to the lens to warn users when their glucose levels cross certain thresholds. The sensors are so small that they ”look like bits of glitter.”

Google says it is working with the FDA to turn these prototypes into real products and that it is working with experts to bring this technology to market. These partners, the company says, “will use our technology for a smart contact lens and develop apps that would make the measurements available to the wearer and their doctor.”

It’s worth noting that other companies, including Microsoft, have previously shown similar lenses. Until now, though, it doesn’t look like there are any smart lenses available in the U.S. yet. Given Google’s reach, however, it may just be able to find the right partners to bring this technology to market.

infographic-e1389916077325

[image via recode]

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Google Unveils Smart Contact Lens That Lets Diabetics Measure Their Glucose Levels

Hand holding - zoomed in

This isn’t Google Glass in a contact lens, but it may just be Google’s first step in this direction. The company’s Google X lab just teased a smart contact lens on its blog that is meant to help diabetics measure their glucose levels.

The company says it is currently testing prototypes of this contact lens that use a tiny wireless chip and a miniaturized glucose sensor. These chips are embedded in between two soft layers of lens material.

In its announcement, Google notes that scientists have long looked into how certain body fluids can help them track glucose levels. Tears, it turns out, work very well, but given that most people aren’t Hollywood actors and can cry on demand, using tears was never really an option.

According to Google, the sensor can take about one reading per second, and it is working on adding tiny LED lights to the lens to warn users when their glucose levels cross certain thresholds. The sensors are so small that they ”look like bits of glitter.”

Google says it is working with the FDA to turn these prototypes into real products and that it is working with experts to bring this technology to market. These partners, the company says, “will use our technology for a smart contact lens and develop apps that would make the measurements available to the wearer and their doctor.”

It’s worth noting that other companies, including Microsoft, have previously shown similar lenses. Until now, though, it doesn’t look like there are any smart lenses available in the U.S. yet. Given Google’s reach, however, it may just be able to find the right partners to bring this technology to market.

infographic-e1389916077325

[image via recode]

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History of the bionic/electronic contact lenses?

Question by ctem: History of the bionic/electronic contact lenses?
Please give me details such as the person who thought of it, and when. Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Anus Burgers
A long time ago.

Give your answer to this question below!

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Cheaters used infrared contact lenses and marked cards to win over 90,000 euros in poker

This tale of poker cheats has all the signs of a Hollywood movie: high-tech contact lenses, marked playing cards, corrupt casino employees, and the French Riviera. Back in 2011, an Italian man codenamed “Parmesan” racked up 70,000 euros in one day of poker winnings followed up by 21,000 more in another visit, according to The Telegraph. He and his accomplices — which included two casino employees — found a way to mark the cards with invisible ink. Parmesan, a 56-year-old man whose real name is Stefano Ampollini, then used infrared contact lenses purchased online for 2,000 euros from a Chinese company to read his competitors’ hands.

Like many other card sharps, the men’s downfall was their success. The casino’s lawyer told The…

Continue reading…

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Cota by Ossia hopes to charge your phone wirelessly, no contact required

DNP Cota by Ossia hopes to wirelessly charge your phone without line of sight

We’ve all heard of wireless charging before, but most solutions still require your phone to come in touch with a base station. Well, Cota is a technology that aims to power your mobile device completely wirelessly — without any physical contact at all. Hatem Zeine, a physicist and CEO of Ossia Inc, demonstrated the technology on stage at TechCrunch Disrupt when he successfully charged his iPhone when plugged with a Cota prototype, seen above, while holding it several feet away from a charging station.

It all seems like voodoo, but the secret lies in sending a magnetic charge over the same 2.4GHz spectrum that WiFi and Bluetooth already use. If you’re concerned about safety, Zeine assures us that only one watt of power is transmitted — that’s a third of what cell phones already transmit. Line of sight isn’t required, and Zeine claims that one station can power multiple devices at once. Just like a WiFi hotspot, you can set it so that it only works with certain devices or simply open it up so that power is available to all Cota-enabled handsets within range, which is around 30 feet.

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: Cota by Ossia

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Plastic skin lights up on contact, may lead to touchscreens everywhere (video)

Plastic OLED skin lights up on contact

Flexible circuitry is frequently a one-way affair — we’ve seen bendy displays and touch layers, but rarely both in one surface. UC Berkeley is at last merging those two technologies through a plastic skin whose display reacts to touch. By curing a polymer on top of a silicon wafer, the school’s researchers found that they could unite a grid of pressure sensors with an OLED screen; they just had to remove the polymer to create a flexible skin. As the film-like material can be laminated on just about anything, it maylead to touch displays in places where they were previously impractical, or even very thin blood pressure sensors. It could also be easy to produce — since the skins use off-the-shelf chip manufacturing techniques, commercial products are well within reach.

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Via: Phys.org

Source: UC Berkeley

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GEAK Ring puts NFC on your finger, unlocks phones and shares your contact card

GEAK Ring is the one ring to

Some say NFC is dead, but GEAK from Shanghai wants to prove them wrong. Announced alongside the GEAK Watch earlier today was this GEAK Ring, a tiny NFC-enabled wearable device that stores your identity. The ring’s pitched as an intuitive way to unlock your phone — just hold it with the hand that’s wearing the ring, and it’ll unlock without having to type in the password; plus it’ll stay awake as long as it’s still in the same hand. Another feature is that since the ring has your contact details stored (presumably rewritable), you can also use it to share your contact card with other NFC-enabled devices. But of course, given the risk of NFC cloning, you should treat GEAK’s solution as a convenience rather than a more secure method.

At launch, this ring will only be compatible with the GEAK Eye and GEAK Mars quad-core phones that were also announced today, but it’ll support other devices from the likes of Samsung, Xiaomi and Oppo starting in November. GEAK will be taking pre-orders from August 8th, and it’ll cost Chinese buyers ¥199 or about $ 30 each. It’ll sure go nicely alongside that Google ring.

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Via: Engadget Chinese

Source: GEAK (Chinese)

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Skype for Windows 8 gains contact blocking and performances improvements

Skype for Windows 8 gains contact blocking and performances improvements

Those of you utilizing Skype in Windows 8 will be delighted to already know that Microsoft’s just bumped the app to variation 1.6. It’s been a couple of months because the last upgrade, and this revision brings even more attributes to the table, consisting of contact obstructing and a slew of performance tweaks. You’re now able to block individuals, with an option to remove or state the offending celebration. Speed and reliability have been improved, particularly when loading contacts, and a variety of bugs have been taken care of, consisting of one where the outward bound video was not always displayed after changing cameras. The upgrade’s available in Windows Store, so exactly what are you waiting for?

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CoastToCoastAM – ET Contact & UFO Hunter – Coast AM – June 2012

CoastToCoastAM - ET Contact & UFO Hunter - Coast AM - June 2012

Watch \* NEW \* Forensic Proof Here!: www.youtube.com Extraterrestrial life (from the Latin words: additional [" beyond", or "not of"] and terrestris [" of or belonging to Earth"]) is defined as life that does not originate from Earth. It is typically also described as alien life, or merely aliens (or area aliens, to separate from various other meanings of alien or aliens). These hypothetical types of life range from easy bacteria-like organisms to beings far more complex than people. The development and testing of hypotheses on extraterrestrial life is understood as exobiology or astrobiology; the term astrobiology, nevertheless, includes the study of life on Earth saw in its astronomical context. Lots of experts consider extraterrestrial life to be plausible, however there is no definitive proof for its presence. Because the mid-20th century, there has been a continuous search for indicators of extraterrestrial life, from radios made use of to spot feasible extraterrestrial signals, to telescopes used to look for potentially habitable extrasolar worlds. It has actually additionally played a significant job in works of science fiction. Alien life, such as bacteria, has actually been hypothesized to exist in the Solar System and throughout the world. This hypothesis depends on the large size and constant physical laws of the observable universe. According to this argument, made by researchers such as Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking, it would be unlikely for life not to exist someplace besides Earth. [1] [2] This argument

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