Posts Tagged ‘Benchmarks’

Early benchmarks suggest NVIDIA’s new Tegra chip outperforms Apple and Qualcomm

The graph above comes courtesy of Tom’s Hardware and, whichever way you look it, it suggests NVIDIA is onto a good thing. The company’s recently announced Tegra K1 processor combines a handful of ARM Cortex-A15 CPUs with a GPU based on the same …

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Early benchmarks suggest NVIDIA’s new Tegra chip outperforms Apple and Qualcomm

The graph above comes courtesy of Tom’s Hardware and, whichever way you look it, it suggests NVIDIA is onto a good thing. The company’s recently announced Tegra K1 processor combines a handful of ARM Cortex-A15 CPUs with a GPU based on the same …

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Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2 specs and benchmarks make the rounds

Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2 specs and benchmarks make the rounds
As the name suggests, the biggest highlight of the Samsung Galaxy Note Pro 12.2 will be its display. It is a 12.2” unit with WQXGA resolution (2560 x 1600 pixels) and 16:10 aspect ratio. Coupled with an S Pen, the large screen is bound to make the …
Read more on GSMArena.com (blog)

Samsung Galaxy Camera 2 – bigger brain, better snaps
Samsung has revealed the second generation Galaxy Camera ahead of its CES show floor debut, and it's thankfully had a pleasant faux-leather makeover. Featuring a 4.8in touchscreen which serves up the majority of the controls, the Galaxy Camera 2 …
Read more on Stuff.tv

Samsung Galaxy Camera 2 finally arrives, with selfie mode
It's been over a year since the first Android-powered camera, and the sequel is finally here: the Samsung Galaxy Camera 2 is unveiled today with a 21x zoom and Android 4.3 Jelly Bean — plus selfie mode. The new Galaxy Camera 2 packs a 16-megapixel …
Read more on CNET UK

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Galaxy Note 3 Benchmark Boosts Miss The Point That No One Cares About Benchmarks

Galxy Note3_031_set2

Samsung is being called out by the highly respected and thorough Ars Technica for apparently “artificially” boosting the Galaxy Note 3′s performance specifically when it comes to benchmark testing.  The blog found that while under normal testing the Note 3 vastly outperformed the LG G2, which has the same processor, after stripping away some fancy benchmark-specific code, the phone scored about the same as its LG competitor.

Ars has a very good, very long explanation of how they arrived at their findings, and the end result is an artificial benchmark bump of between 20 and 50 percent in all areas depending on which benchmarking tools you use, including industry standards like Antutu and Geekbench. It’s a good read if you’re interested in that sort of thing, but the upshot is, you probably aren’t. Which is why Samsung has even more egg on its face.

Artificially enhancing performance benchmarks for a smartphone these days is like artificially enhancing the smoothness of your elbows via plastic surgery: it may mean that overall, you technically present a more attractive package on the surface, but no one’s really going to know or care that you’ve had any work done.

Apple’s iPhone 5s reportedly benchmarks up in the same ranks as some fairly recent Mac computers, for instance, but that’s not something your average iPhone 5s buyer is likely to know. Also, it doesn’t mean anything; benchmark scores doesn’t mean one device will be able to handle the same tasks as the other, like running a professional video editing software suite for example.

Long ago, Apple realized that a specs race wasn’t the same as the race for market dominance. Actual buyers cared about the phone experience, not abstract numbers which may or may not be borne out by really using software and apps. It’s true that Apple still talks about performance when it touts new devices – but it does so relatively, explaining only how much faster or more efficient something is compared to previous generations. That frames the discussion in terms that everyday users can understand, making it genuinely useful information.

The end result is that Samsung looks like it’s grasping when it takes an abstract (essentially meaningless, for all intents and purposes) number and artificially builds that up to win praise from some whitecoats who test these things for a living. It seems to be doing this as a matter of course now, as Ars says it’s seeing similar behaviour in testing the new Galaxy Note 10 Android tablet from Samsung as well. And, in the end, its unadjusted numbers were actually faster than competitors like the G2 anyway; if for some reason as an OEM you’re still concerned with winning a specs race on paper at this point (which you shouldn’t be), you don’t need to win by a wide margin, especially at the risk of looking foolish.

Unadjusted numbers would’ve won faint praise from the crowd that likes them, and gone unnoticed by most. Artificially altered ones attract a whole lot of negative attention and result in a net bad look for Samsung. The Note 3, like most high-end Samsung hardware, is probably a great phone, but now it’s embroiled in a doping scandal, over a number nobody really cares about.

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New iPhone 5S vs Samsung Galaxy S4 – Gaming Performance Speed Test & Benchmarks

The Samsung Galaxy S4 and the New iPhone 5S. Compared. Subscribe to for the full iPhone 5S review! Full iPhone 5S, 5C playlist will have review, unboxing, an…
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Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 MDP benchmarks: prepare for ludicrous speed

Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 MDP benchmarks prepare for ludicrous speed

Today we had a chance to play with Qualcomm’s latest MDP devices (tablet and phone) which pack the company’s mighty Snapdragon 800 SoC (MSM8974). The tablet is slightly larger than last year’s MDP and features a 11.6-inch 1920 x 1080 pixel display, 2GB of LPDDR3 RAM, 32GB of built-in flash storage (with microSD expansion) and a 12 megapixel AF rear camera with flash (2MP in front). All of this is crammed into a light and slim (0.46 inches / 11.7mm) chassis that’s powered by a 3400mAh Li-ion battery and includes a bevvy of radios (LTE, WiFi ac, Bluetooth 4 LE, GPS, NFC) and sensors (including pressure and humidity).

We put the Snapdragon 800-equipped MDP through its paces by running our usual suite of benchmarks (plus a few more). The results? Prepare for ludicrous speed.

Developing…

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ASUS 7970 Direct CU II Eyefinity Benchmarks on 3 ASUS VN247H Monitors

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Acer V350 reportedly spotted in benchmarks with Snapdragon S4, Jelly Bean

Acer V350 reportedly spotted in benchmarks with Snapdragon S4, Jelly Bean

Acer may be something of a leaky ship. Just days after we saw the supposed V360 smartphone pose for the camera, a possibly related V350 model has reportedly shown up in GLBenchmark’s results. Despite the lower number in the naming scheme, the device put through testing looks to be the higher-end of the two. It jumps to a 720p screen, a speedier 1.5GHz Snapdragon S4 processor and even a slightly newer Android 4.1.2 build of Jelly Bean. Without a peek at other details, we don’t know what else if anything might be upgraded over the V360, or if this is indeed a real device — benchmarks aren’t definitive proof, after all. If history is an indicator, though, we could get full details of the V350 near Mobile World Congress in February, like with past devices. We just hope Acer is timelier about actually getting to market this time around.

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Via: Phone Arena

Source: GLBenchmark

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Benchmarks hint at budget ASUS ME172V Jelly Bean tablet, 1GHz processor Mali 400 GPU

GLBenchmarks hint at budget ASUS ME172V Jelly Bean tablet, 1GHz processor Mali 400 Graphics

ASUS has actually been a sturdy force in the tablet game even prior to it set a brand-new price-to-quality standard with Google’s Nexus 7. It looks like the firm could be tightening up the spending plan screw even further, if some recent GLBenchmarks are to be believed. The details are thin, but describe a product with design number ME172V (which follows from its pre-Nexus smaller sized tablet line), that runs Android 4.1.1 Jelly Bean, sports a 1,024 x 552 (likely 1,024 x 600) resolution powered by a Mali 400 GPU and 1GHz chip. There’s no indicator on the number of cores, or, well, much else for that matter. Numerous rumors are keen to recommend there ‘d be support for microSD, which if real, would make it extremely unlikely to be a Nexus. But a spending plan tablet by the same maker, is most likely enough for lots of people all the exact same.

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Did the Galaxy Note II’s remarkable benchmarks briefly get passed?

Did the Galaxy Note II's impressive benchmarks briefly get leaked

Well, Samsung has something up its sleeve, we understand that much. Whether or not we’re examining a new Note remains to be seen, however it’s safe to assume Sammy will certainly update its phablet line as it approaches its first birthday. So it’s no wonder people’s uncertainties were piqued when a mysterious tool made a quick look at GLBenchmark.com with the design number GT-N7100. The original Note was N7000, so certainly several are guessing this unnamed Ice Cream Sandwich gadget is its successor. All the details have actually since been pulled, however PhoneArena managed to snag a screenshot. Whatever it ends up, we understand it’s got a 1.6 GHz quad-core Exynos 4412 processor with Mali-400 graphics– the same you’ll locate inside the Galaxy S III. The one specification that does leave a bit of doubt however is the resolution, which is noted at juts 1280×720, as an alternative of the 1280×800 of the original. In the benchmarks it takes care of to eke out scores somewhat higher than the GSIII, which makes sense thanks to its higher clocked CPU. Now it’s simply time to unwind and play the hanging around game.

Filed under: Jul 2012 19:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for usage of feeds. Permalink Electronista|PhoneArena , GLBenchmark.com|Email this|Opinions

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