Posts Tagged ‘Astronauts’

NASA to admit that astronaut’s near-death could have been avoided

NASA today will admit that the near-death of an astronaut during a spacewalk last year could have been avoided, according to a report from ABC News. In a report to be released Wednesday morning, NASA will acknowledge that astronaut Luca Parmitano’s suit leaked on two occasions in July. The agency had previously only reported one leak, on July 16th, when Parmitano’s suit helmet began filling up with water. Today’s report will acknowledge that the suit leaked on July 9th, but news of the mishap never made it up NASA’s chain of command.

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NASA to admit that astronaut’s near-death could have been avoided

NASA today will admit that the near-death of an astronaut during a spacewalk last year could have been avoided, according to a report from ABC News. In a report to be released Wednesday morning, NASA will acknowledge that astronaut Luca Parmitano’s suit leaked on two occasions in July. The agency had previously only reported one leak, on July 16th, when Parmitano’s suit helmet began filling up with water. Today’s report will acknowledge that the suit leaked on July 9th, but news of the mishap never made it up NASA’s chain of command.

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ISS astronauts perform first of three urgent spacewalks to repair coolant system

NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins are several hours into the first of three spacewalks intended to repair the International Space Station’s malfunctioning coolant system. On December 11th, one of the station’s two coolant loops unexpectedly shut down; soon after, astronauts turned off some nonessential equipment in an effort to reduce power load. NASA says that none of the six ISS crew members are in any immediate danger, but the space agency still wants the problem fixed to avoid any other sudden failures. The live feed of the spacewalk can be viewed below.

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Moon walker demo at CEATEC lets wannabe astronauts feel 0.6G (video)

DNP TE Connectivity demo at CEATEC lets you feel like you're on the moon handson

When we saw a guy strapped to a crane, bounced between colored spots on the floor, we had to have a go find out more. Within CEATEC, there are halls filled with companies you’ve not yet heard of. TE Connectivity is probably one of them, regardless of the fact that it’s a huge producer of data connectors, power protectors and other things that mass producers like. Now exactly why it’s got this moon gravity simulator at the front of its stand is harder to explain, however there’s plenty of the manufacturer’s products within its moon walker simulator. They include a high-speed USB connector right above the harness, floor sensors that detect your landing, some other NASA-authorized parts and dynamic sensors within the balance motor that ensure that any hobbyist astronauts in training (like ourselves) don’t spin out of control while bounding around at 0.6G.

A computer behind the scenes continuously calculates and adjusts exactly how much lift it gives your body once you’re strapped in. Then the aim to this demo is to hop between specific colored spots on the ground, which was a little harder than it sounds. We strap ourselves in after the break. %Gallery-slideshow99771%

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Here Are Some Amazing Photographs Of Early Astronauts And Their Wives

Lily Koppel’s new nonfiction book, The Astronaut Wives Club , looks at the historic time in America when astronauts were heroes and their families were emblems. She talks about the book and the photos she gathered.

The family of Jim Lovell (of “Houston, we have a problem” fame) watching Apollo 8 liftoff on Dec. 21, 1968. From left: James, Jeffery, Susan, Marilyn Lovell, and Barbara.

Via: Courtesy: NASA

The adventurous spirit of the space era of 1960s America feels awfully far away. Spending billions of dollars for the sake of science and exploration — are we still doing that in any way anyone notices, or wants to know about? I have no idea.

Lily Koppel’s new nonfiction book, The Astronaut Wives Club, out this week, takes its readers from the inception of the astronaut program in 1959 through Apollo 17 in 1972, the final manned moon landing. It effectively — and rivetingly, I found — goes through those 13 years of U.S. history by telling the NASA story through the domestic sphere: specifically, through the wives' lives. And for most of the space program, a wife and children were a job requirement for the astronauts — though fidelity and being physically present were not — so there ended up being a lot of them.

And they became close to each other. There was a literal Astronaut Wives Club. “They really had to sort of rely on each other to make it through the space race — and they were on this parallel mission to their husbands,” said Koppel in a recent telephone interview.

Most of the wives went from being military spouses just scraping by to celebrities with cash they'd never had and reporters trailing after them. “It was intoxicating,” said Koppel. “The whole country had space fever. And they were a part of it. They felt very much like they were playing a really important role.”

Their marriages, like that of the space-championing Kennedys', whom some of the astronaut families got to meet and befriend, were meant to reflect an ideal. It was a fulltime PR job. “All the astronauts, even today, fully attest to the fact that without them, it would have been sort of impossible, because they were just working all the time,” said Koppel. “The women kept the whole public relations image that everything was still perfect back on Earth.”

Koppel shared some photographs with BuzzFeed that she had gathered during the reporting of The Astronaut Wives Club.

Here is the Lovell family.

Here is the Lovell family.

Via: NASA

This photograph was taken in their home in Dec. 1968, a few days before Apollo 8, which was the first mission to orbit the moon, and “was given a 50/50 chance by NASA,” Koppel said. Describing the Lovells, Koppel said: “In a way, they’re representative of many of the astronauts and their wives: they were high school sweethearts, they got married after Jim graduated from Annapolis. Marilyn was with him all throughout his test pilot career. These are careers that were sort of built on partnerships. Although they started in the '50s when we don't think of women as particularly liberated, you had to be adventurous to the point of almost being a superwoman to be married to one of these guys. Because their job was so dangerous, and they were so macho.”


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ISS astronauts will answer your questions by Google+ Hangout on February 22nd

international space station

ISS astronauts Kevin Ford, Tom Marshburn, Chris Hadfield will be answering questions from space on a Google + Hangout. From 11am to 12pm EST on February 22nd, the 3 will attend to audiences at google.com/+NASA, taking a mix of pre-recorded video questions and real-time ones from social networks. If you want recording a concern, you’ll have till February 12th to upload a YouTube video of 30 seconds or less tagged with # askAstro. The exact same tag could be made use of for text questions on Twitter, YouTube, or Google +, and a Facebook page will level on the 22nd.

Though it’s unclear the amount of they have actually taken off as a social device, Hangouts have actually become prominent as a kind of open press conference, with the White Home specifically …

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Astronauts on ISS to shoot the breeze in Google+ Hangout, answer your questions

Astronauts on ISS to shoot the breeze in Google+ Hangout, answer your questions

Astronauts aboard the International Area Station and right here on terra firma are clearing their schedules for a Google + Hangout on February 22nd, which will be the first NASA-coordinated Hangout with the ISS. In between 11 AM and noon ET, astronauts will respond to concerns previously submitted via video clips and those streaming in from the space company’s Facebook page, Google + and through Tweets tagged with # askAstro. NASA isn’t really saying who’ll snag live face-time with the spacefarers during the Hangout, however it is asking people to upload one-of-a-kind and original questions in clips of 30 seconds or less to YouTube by February 12th. Yearning to have a query responded to? Struck the jump for the complete submission specifics. Declared under: Science, GoogleCommentsSource: NASA

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The Super Bowl will be beamed to astronauts on board the ISS

international space station

As you rest to watch the Super Bowl with your friend and family, take a minute to think about those doing more or less the exact same thing hundreds of miles above the Earth’s area. NASA has actually verified to Space.com that the 6 astronauts currently on board the International Area Station will certainly get to enjoy the game; Mission Control made a point of asking the team on Friday if they desired it broadcast to them. It’s not an uncommon event for the astronauts– they had the ability to enjoy the Olympic Gamings last summer season, for example– but it’s a comforting suggestion that they’re not totally cut off from the world. Even if we doubt that the ISS has an 85-inch 4K Television Set up.

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Boeing CST-100 capsule could shuttle astronauts to ISS, shows off its innards in Colorado Springs

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With the Space Shuttle now officially grounded, NASA has been researching alternatives for ferrying astronauts from Earth to the International Space Station, orbiting some 230 miles above the planet. One such vehicle has made its way from Boeing’s HQ to the National Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, where a full-size model is on display for conference attendees. Externally, the spacecraft appears very similar to the reentry modules of yesteryear, measuring 14.5 feet with room for up to seven people. The craft is designed to make its way through the atmosphere mounted to an Atlas V rocket, and is rated for up to 10 roundtrip missions. As is typical with spacecraft, it looks like astronauts won’t be traveling with first-class accommodations — things will likely feel quite cozy when the CST-100 is at capacity — but such conditions come with the territory. There’s no date set for delivery, but the craft could be making its way to space as early as 2015, and has reportedly been tested in the Nevada desert as recently as this month.

Boeing CST-100 capsule could shuttle astronauts to ISS, shows off its innards in Colorado Springs originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 19 Apr 2012 17:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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NASA-sponsored study finds lengthy spaceflight can impair astronauts’ vision

NASA has of course long been monitoring the affects of spaceflight on astronauts’ health, but a recent study sponsored by the space agency is now shedding some new light on one potentially significant problem: their eyesight. While the study only involved seven astronauts, all reported that they suffered some degree of blurry vision while on the space station for more than six months, and some reported that the effects persisted for months after they returned to Earth. The study also found specific abnormalities in all of the astronauts affected, including changes in tissue, fluids, nerves and other structures in the back of the eye. Those problems are all relatively minor and correctable, but researchers are now also taking the findings and working on ways to determine who might be most resistant to any such changes, which could be critical on something as long as a three-year mission to Mars. Additional details of the study are in the press release after the break, and the full report is published in the latest issue of Ophthalmology.

[Image: NASA]

Continue reading NASA-sponsored study finds lengthy spaceflight can impair astronauts’ vision

NASA-sponsored study finds lengthy spaceflight can impair astronauts’ vision originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 05 Nov 2011 07:14:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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