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Posts Tagged ‘Asteroid’

US budget has NASA planning to capture an asteroid, USAF reviving DSCOVR (video)

2014 US budgets have NASA towing an asteroid near the Moon, reviving DSCOVR

Numerous have actually lamented the seeming decrease of the US area program. While we’re not expecting an immediate return to the halcyon days, the Head of state’s proposed federal spending plan for financial 2014 might see some restored ambition. NASA’s slice of the pie consists of a strategy that would enhance detection of near-Earth asteroids, send a solar-powered robotic ship (like the NASA concept above) to capture among the space rocks and tow it back to a stable orbit near Earth, where analysts could study it up close. The company would have people setting foot on the asteroid by 2025, or even as quickly as 2021. It’s a marvelous objective to state the least, however we ‘d potentially find out more about solar propulsion and defenses against asteroid collisions.

If NASA’s plans mainly involve the future, the US Air Force budget is exploring the past. It’s setting aside $ 35 million for a long-discussed rebirth of the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite, likewise understood as DSCOVR– a vehicle that was scuppered in 2001 due to cost overruns, amongst various other aspects. Run by NOAA once aloft, the modernized satellite would concentrate on cautioning the Earth about incoming solar winds. That’s just among the satellite’s initial goals, but the November 2014 launch target is fairly practical– and we’ll need it when the satellite presently fulfilling the job is overdue for a replacement.

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NASA to get $100 million for asteroid wrangling project, says senator

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The space lasso could soon be a reality. Senator Bill Nelson (D – FL) says that NASA is likely to get the $ 100 million it’s requesting to begin work on a robotic spaceship that could trap an asteroid and bring it into orbit around the moon in 2019, reports Space.com. “This is part of what will be a much broader program,” said Nelson on Friday. “The plan combines the science of mining an asteroid, along with developing ways to deflect one, along with providing a place to develop ways we can go to Mars.” Astronauts would then fly NASA’s Orion capsule and Space Launch Rocket System to the asteroid to begin research and exploration of the near-Earth object in 2021, said Nelson. The Washington Post reports that the mission could…

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Could paintballs deflect an asteroid headed for Earth?

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An MIT pupil has advanced a fascinating idea: paintballs could deflect an asteroid’s path enough to avert a collision with Earth. As demonstrated in the video below, a pair of perfectly-timed white paintball rounds must be enough to knock an asteroid off its current trajectory, however the truly smart bit happens after. By covering the asteroid’s area in white paint its albedo (reflectivity) would certainly increase. The highly-reflective asteroid would certainly then be taken further off course by the pressure of the sunlight’s photons bouncing off the white area.

The concept originates from Sung Wook Paek, who yesterday won the 2012 “Move an Asteroid Technical Paper Competition,” sponsored by the United Nations’ Space Generation Advisory Council for …

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Parrot unveils Asteroid Smart, Tablet and Mini car infotainment systems, we go hands-on

Parrot unveils Asteroid Smart, Tablet and Mini car infotainment systems, we go handson

We first laid eyes on Parrot’s first Android-based Asteroid car infotainment system a couple years ago at CES. Then, at this past year’s show, we got a sneak peek at a trio of successor Asteroid devices. Now, a mere 10 months later, the Asteroid Smart, Tablet and Mini have finally arrived in consumer-ready garb. First, there’s a flagship in-dash system, the double-DIN Asteroid Smart. It features a 6.2-inch 800 x 480 capacitive display, a Texas Instruments 800MHz processor and runs a heavily skinned version of Android 2.3. The Smart also has four USB 2.0 ports (one which pushes 5V to charge an iPod) for connecting external devices like the included GPS antenna or a dongle for cellular data. Plus, there are 3.5mm line-in and microphone jacks to go with a host of RCA connections and a micro-USB port round the back. Bluetooth 3.0 is baked in, and an SD card slot sits behind the detachable security strip to the left of the screen.

The Smart’s siblings, the Asteroid Mini and Asteroid Tablet are also coming to North America this month. The Tablet packs similar specs as the Smart, only it’s got a 5-inch capacitive screen and is portable, as opposed to an in-dash solution. It runs the same skinned version of Gingerbread, has GPS and Bluetooth radios, and packs 512MB of RAM and 1GB of on-board storage, plus an SD slot. It also comes with a wireless touchpad remote so you can control the system straight from your steering wheel. Meanwhile, the Mini, with its 3.2-inch, non-touch screen has a similar form factor to the Tablet and comes with a wireless remote as well. However, its OS is built on Android 1.5 and it relies upon an external GPS antenna like its bigger, double-DIN cousin. The Asteroid Tablet will retail for $ 399, and the Mini will cost a hundred bucks less when they go on sale in a few weeks.

We got to swipe our way around the Parrot Smart, so join us after the break to see it in action.

Continue reading Parrot unveils Asteroid Smart, Tablet and Mini car infotainment systems, we go hands-on

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Parrot unveils Asteroid Smart, Tablet and Mini car infotainment systems, we go hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 04 Oct 2012 20:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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We’re All Gonna Die!: Asteroid To Pass Near Earth Next February 15th (So Don’t Go Crazy On Valentine’s)

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Sure you could argue 17,000-miles isn’t actually that close, but everything is relative. Compared to the rest of space that’s like the distance between your privates and b-hole. DANGEROUSLY CLOSE. Also, I don’t trust NASA’s calculations enough to believe there’s not a chance this thing is gonna smash into us. And THAT, my friends, is why I just sold all my belongings and plan on living in my car until the world ends. “But I thought you didn’t own anything.” What the — DO I LOOK LIKE A COMMIE TO YOU?

Astronomers say it will pass at a distance of 17,000 miles from the surface of the Earth – which is much closer to the ground than GPS and communications satellites orbit. In comparison, satellites that provide television and radio signals to the public orbit at an altitude of more than 22,000 miles. GPS satellites orbit at about 12,000 miles in altitude. The International Space Station orbits much closer – at a distance of about 225 miles.

Astronomer Phil Plait, author of Discover Magazine’s Bad Astronomy blog, says the odds of an impact on February’s pass are so low that there’s no risk.

“Asteroid 2012 DA14 is almost certainly not going to hit the Earth next February. And by ‘almost certainly,’ I mean it: the odds of an impact are so low they are essentially zero. This does not rule out an impact at some future date, but for now we’re safe,” Plait said in a weekend blog entry.

Safe my ass — we’re as good as dead! We need to get Bruce Willis and the rest of the crew on that rock to blow it up for us pronto. And, I hope you know I’m being honest when I say this, but I don’t care if they come back or not. “You’re terrible!” Am I really? Or just capable of being honest with myself on a level your pseudo-morality prevents? “No, you’re actually a terrible human being.” *revealing third tit* Who says I’m human?

No danger from asteroid’s super close flyby — this time [11alive]

Thanks to kyle and Brandon, who are already starting cults. Smart.

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We’re All Gonna Die!: Asteroid To Pass Near Earth Next February 15th (So Don’t Go Crazy On Valentine’s)

were-all-gonna-die.jpg

Sure you could argue 17,000-miles isn’t actually that close, but everything is relative. Compared to the rest of space that’s like the distance between your privates and b-hole. DANGEROUSLY CLOSE. Also, I don’t trust NASA’s calculations enough to believe there’s not a chance this thing is gonna smash into us. And THAT, my friends, is why I just sold all my belongings and plan on living in my car until the world ends. “But I thought you didn’t own anything.” What the — DO I LOOK LIKE A COMMIE TO YOU?

Astronomers say it will pass at a distance of 17,000 miles from the surface of the Earth – which is much closer to the ground than GPS and communications satellites orbit. In comparison, satellites that provide television and radio signals to the public orbit at an altitude of more than 22,000 miles. GPS satellites orbit at about 12,000 miles in altitude. The International Space Station orbits much closer – at a distance of about 225 miles.

Astronomer Phil Plait, author of Discover Magazine’s Bad Astronomy blog, says the odds of an impact on February’s pass are so low that there’s no risk.

“Asteroid 2012 DA14 is almost certainly not going to hit the Earth next February. And by ‘almost certainly,’ I mean it: the odds of an impact are so low they are essentially zero. This does not rule out an impact at some future date, but for now we’re safe,” Plait said in a weekend blog entry.

Safe my ass — we’re as good as dead! We need to get Bruce Willis and the rest of the crew on that rock to blow it up for us pronto. And, I hope you know I’m being honest when I say this, but I don’t care if they come back or not. “You’re terrible!” Am I really? Or just capable of being honest with myself on a level your pseudo-morality prevents? “No, you’re actually a terrible human being.” *revealing third tit* Who says I’m human?

No danger from asteroid’s super close flyby — this time [11alive]

Thanks to kyle and Brandon, who are already starting cults. Smart.

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Parrot Asteroid CK, Asteroid Nav, Asteroid 2DIN infotainment systems: hands-on (video)

At last year’s CES, Parrot unveiled its Asteroid car receiver — a nifty little head unit that brought Android apps to a driver’s dashboard. Today, the company expanded its infotainment reach with three new in-car systems: the Asteroid CK, Asteroid Nav, and Asteroid 2DIN. Much like its predecessor, the Asteroid CK features a 3.2-inch color display, and can be attached directly to a vehicle’s dashboard. This Bluetooth-powered, Gingerbread (2.3.4)-laced hands-free system connects to the web via tethered phone or 3G key, giving users access to a host of geolocation services, driving assistance features and streaming music. The device also comes with a wireless remote, and features voice recognition capabilities that allow users to place calls or browse their music libraries without taking their hands off the wheel. The Asteroid Nav, meanwhile, features a five-inch, capacitive multi-touch display and offers many of the same functions you’ll find on the CK, along with an enhanced onscreen navigation system. At the larger end of the spectrum lurks the Asteroid 2DIN: a “2DIN-connected multimedia car radio” designed to fit within the central column of a car’s dashboard. Here, you’ll be able to take advantage of hands-free calling, music streaming services and and RDS text+ service, along with an array of online services and navigation functions. The 2DIN also packs no less than two inputs, with one designed for rearview camera displays, and one for video output. No word yet on pricing or availability, but be sure to check out our hands-on video, after the break.

Continue reading Parrot Asteroid CK, Asteroid Nav, Asteroid 2DIN infotainment systems: hands-on (video)

Parrot Asteroid CK, Asteroid Nav, Asteroid 2DIN infotainment systems: hands-on (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 08 Jan 2012 21:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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First Glimpse Of Asteroid Vesta From Orbiter

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Note: Larger version HERE in case you’re confused why it’s not a scooter. Vesta, not Vespa, dummy!

Hey did you know we sent an orbiter to (what else?!) orbit Vesta, a prominent asteroid in the asteroid belt? Me neither, and I like to keep up on space! Also: women’s fashion magazines. What? We all have our vices!

Today NASA unveiled the first pictures of the asteroid Vesta as seen from an orbiting spacecraft. The pictures of the not-quite-round, 330-mile-wide (530-kilometer-wide) world were sent across a distance of 117 million miles (188 million kilometers). after the Dawn orbiter’s successful weekend rendezvous.

Dawn went into orbit around 1 a.m. ET Saturday, at a distance of about 9,900 miles (16,000 kilometers) from Vesta. The pockmarked space rock ranks as the asteroid belt’s No. 1 object in brightness, No. 2 in mass (behind the dwarf planet Ceres) and No. 3 in diameter (behind Ceres and the asteroid Pallas).

Size isn’t everything: Scientists are interested in Vesta largely because it’s thought to be made of the stuff that dominated the early solar system.

You hear that, ladies?! It said ‘size isn’t everything’ AND THAT’S ACCORDING TO SCIENTISTS. You can’t argue with scientific knowledge. Now, I expect hand-written apologies from all former lovers by morning. “HA — the Geekologie Writer has former lovers. LOL!” Okay now you’re just hurting feelings.

First views of Vesta from orbit [msnbc]

Thanks to Mr. Fancy, who lost his monocle and white gloves after getting wasted off 23-year old small-batch bourbon. Next time invite a brother! I mean me — next time invite me.

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Space Probe to Return with Asteroid Sample

Hayabusa probeA space probe launched by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is expected to land in the Australian outback late Sunday after a seven-year journey to a nearby asteroid. Scientists hope the probe will be carrying a sample from the asteroid which will mark the first time a spacecraft has returned to Earth with samples other than from the Earth’s moon.

The probe named Hayabusa landed on the asteroid Itokawa two times in 2005 and after its long return journey will be landing a remote desert in Australia. Among the team to find and recover the probe will be indigenous Aboriginal elders to ensure that the landing of the device did not damage any sacred grounds.

The probe is expected to have landed at 1400 GMT and hopefully contain information about the formation of asteroids as well as a successful test for technology used to return samples back to earth.

National Geographic



Props to SlipperyBrick.com

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