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Posts Tagged ‘applies’

iRobot applies for ‘all-in-one’ 3D printer patent: aims to reduce need for post-processing

iRobot applies for 'allinone' 3D printer patent which reduces need for postprocessing

It’s no floor cleaner, so it appears like iRobot‘s looking to expand its horizons, declaring a patent application for a “robot fabricator”. While not given (yet), the USPTO declaring lays out an all-in-one 3D printer that can post-print milling and processing. Common 3D printing outcomes in an ‘overhang’ extra that should be clipped from the completed short article, but iRobot’s freely worded concept would process these instantly, in addition to seams formed where parts are merged together. Numerous manipulators mean that the item could be contorted over “a minimum of six axes”, while the toolhead would combine together a print and milling head, along with an exotically-named robocasting extruder, which is utilized in developing the layers of material. The design intends to decrease the demand for any non-automated production procedures, hopefully implying effortless turtleshell kart production and reduced printing blemishes– that is, if it makes it to reality.

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Apple applies for patent that scales content to match face distance, save us from squinting

Apple tries for patent that scales content to match face distance, save us from squinting

Most software has to be created around a presumed watching distance, whether it’s up close for a smartphone or the 10-foot interface of a house movie theater hub. Apple has actually been picturing a day when the specific distance can be unimportant: it’s getting a patent that would instantly resize any sort of content based upon viewing distance. By making use of a camera, infrared or other sensors to detect face distance with facial recognition or pure array, the strategy could dynamically resize a map or site to keep it legible at differing arrays. Although the trick might work with the majority of any sort of device, the business sees that flexibility as the majority of relevant for a tablet, and it’s easy to understand why– iPad owners might keep reading the couch without should manually zoom in as they settle into a much more relaxed position. There’s no understanding the likelihood that Apple will carry out an automatic scaling function in iOS or OS X, let alone make it the default setting. If the Cupertino team previously goes that far, however, we’ll just have our very own eyesight to blame if we can not read just what’s on display.

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RIM applies for patent on tablet with concealable keyboard, keeps your QWERTY love a secret

RIM applies for patent on tablet with concealable keyboard, keep your laptop a secret

RIM merely can’t give up keyboards, and neither can easily many of its followers: also the BlackBerry PlayBook has a formal Mini Keyboard situation. It just about really should not be a surprise, then, that the company is applying for a patent on a tablet design with a sneaky keyboard built-in. The design conceals a full, hinge-attached QWERTY keyboard from critics (and unexpected key presses) underneath a back-mounted cover. When a manager’s urge to use physical buttons comes to be overwhelming, the keyboard swings into action and depends on the cover as a kickstand. It’s a clever answer to hauling around a different keyboard or specialized situation, but it’s difficult to say if RIM will certainly implement exactly what it’s finding out into an end product– the firm isn’t really in the greatest position to experiment with brand-new tablet ideas, and we’ve currently seen a couple of imminent solutions to the hidden keyboard complication from other vendors. That stated, the patent does show that the locals in Waterloo would such as to keep a love of keyboards alive in the tablet era, also if it requires some subterfuge.

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for patent on tablet with concealable keyboard, keeps your QWERTY love a secret originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 05 Sep 2012 20:11:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Microsoft applies for high-performance touchscreen patent

Microsoft applies for high-performance touchscreen patent

Bear in mind when Microsoft got us all salivating with a proof-of-concept demo that took touchscreen lag from 100ms to 1ms? Well, Redmond is safeguarding the product of its tireless study by obtaining a patent. The claim focuses heavily on the use of a predictive system that takes an informed guess as to where you’re going to move next, and does some serious preprocessing to minimize lag. The result is a soft moving UI, so long as you do not amaze the predictive algorithms. Do something totally unanticipated and all those preloaded animations have to be flushed, leading to some graphical stutter. We wouldn’t get too energized simply yet, however, the broad patent, appears like it’s a long means out from landing in a smartphone or tablet. The clip we saw in March (rooted after the break) is little even more than a white splotch that follows your finger. However, if also some of this tech makes into future Windows products, anticipate your touchscreen experience to be a much smoother one.

Continue reading Microsoft obtains high-performance touchscreen patentMicrosoft applies for high-performance touchscreen patent appeared on Engadget on Thu, 05 Jul 2012 19:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds. Permalink Unwired Perspective|USPTO|Email this|Comments

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Microsoft applies for low-powered interactive second display system patent

Microsoft applies for low-powered interactive second display system

Oh patent applications… where creative ideas dance shoulder to shoulder with ill-conceived folly. Which do we have here today? We’re not sure. What we are sure of, however, is that someone at Microsoft has applied for a patent that describes a device with two screens. Not that old chestnut, but the second screen being of lower-power, like e-ink, and displaying different information based on the state of the first one (i.e. is it against your face or not.) The not-to-be-trusted images illustrate the second screen covering the back of a device and displaying a clock, or other such user specified info. The app does state that it would continue to display info, even if the device was in a sleep mode, and describes a non-flat contour. If you were to read into it, it might sound like rear e-ink phone housing, but if this ever comes to pass, it’ll likely be with a little bit of dressing down, so don’t get too excited.

Microsoft applies for low-powered interactive second display system patent originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 22 Apr 2012 08:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sony applies for a headset-based navigation pointer, knows you’re not looking

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If you’re finding that the digital compass on your phone keeps leading you down the wrong path, then this patent application from Sony might get you back on track. The claims entail a wireless communication device (aka phone) configured to communicate with a headset. The novelty being, that using orientation information from the headset, the wireless device would determine which direction the user is looking. Based on this information (and your GPS coordinates), the device would then be able to “predict a destination location for the user.” Is this hinting at a new navigation system / accessory, or some neat little tool for geocachers? One thing’s for sure, if you point your head towards the source link below, you’ll locate the full details.

Sony applies for a headset-based navigation pointer, knows you’re not looking originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 29 Mar 2012 14:12:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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AI Demonstrates Natural Learning, Applies New Skills To Civilization

So we’re teaching the computers how to advance their own interests via global warfare, now. Nice knowing you, fellow humans.

Yes, researchers in MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) decided it would interesting to see how a computer with only a basic understanding of the English language would internalize “loose” knowledge. To test this, they had a few very basic AIs (as in, they just move the cursor around and click UI elements randomly) play Civilization against each other.

At first the AIs just interacted randomly. But then they gave one AI access to the user’s manual. It used its ability to read text from the screen to correlate actions with words, and words with items from the manual. Pretty soon it was winning 79% of its games — completely based on its own natural learning processes.

It’s not the first strategy-game AI by far. In fact, one Starcraft AI competition has yielded some seriously sophisticated results, but they were tailored to the game itself. The “naive” AIs in the MIT experiment could only build up a knowledge base from scratch.

The deeper purpose of the experiment was to demonstrate that AIs could determine the meanings of words by interacting with their environment. Today Civilization, tomorrow a factory or hospital, where a drone of some sort might learn new words and actions just from hearing them and seeing them done.

[via io9]



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Apple applies for ‘logo antenna’ patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator

Apple applies for 'logo antenna' patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator

Embedding an antenna in the external body of a phone? Maybe not such a good idea. Hiding it behind the logo sounds a little more practical, and that’s the idea Apple wrote up in a patent application dated June 17th, 2009, back before we knew antennas and gates could be so wickedly conjoined. That was also before we knew about the iPad, which seems to have one of these so-called “logo antennas” within it, as found when iFixit did their dirty thing. The same can be said for iMacs, which also have antennas peering through an apple-shaped hole to avoid any reception issues caused by an aluminum chassis. It looks to be a good solution, but not exactly a novel one. In roaming around the USPTO archives we found a similar 2003 patent from Dell also called “Logo Antenna,” the big difference being that while Apple’s logo forms a window for the antenna the logo in Dell’s patent actually is the antenna.

Apple applies for ‘logo antenna’ patent, hides your resonator behind the brand indicator originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 24 Dec 2010 09:05:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Canon Applies For Patent On New 24-70 F/2.8L Lens


How unexpected. The 24-70 F/2.8L is one of Canon’s best and most popular lenses, but it’s been around since 2002, and although it’s still an excellent piece of kit, it seems that Canon feels it could use a bit of a reworking. They’ve applied for a patent, made public just yesterday, for what appears to be a new version of the versatile lens.

The source quotes some dimensions that appear to put the new lens at a much larger size than the existing one, a move I think is unlikely, so let’s take this with a grain of salt. The new lens appears to have the same number of elements, but fewer groups, which could improve optical qualities. Beyond that I’m not sure.

Hopefully we’ll find out more soon. Of course, I can’t afford this thing anyway; it’d likely debut above the 24-70′s present price, so somewhere around $ 1500, perhaps?

[via Canon Rumors]



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Canon Applies For Patent On New 24-70 F/2.8L Lens


How unexpected. The 24-70 F/2.8L is one of Canon’s best and most popular lenses, but it’s been around since 2002, and although it’s still an excellent piece of kit, it seems that Canon feels it could use a bit of a reworking. They’ve applied for a patent, made public just yesterday, for what appears to be a new version of the versatile lens.

The source quotes some dimensions that appear to put the new lens at a much larger size than the existing one, a move I think is unlikely, so let’s take this with a grain of salt. The new lens appears to have the same number of elements, but fewer groups, which could improve optical qualities. Beyond that I’m not sure.

Hopefully we’ll find out more soon. Of course, I can’t afford this thing anyway; it’d likely debut above the 24-70′s present price, so somewhere around $ 1500, perhaps?

[via Canon Rumors]



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